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Spring Wildflowers - Blooming times:
 Late February through May


Birdfoot Violet

Springtime flowers don't last long; it helps to go into the woods every week to see as many flowers as possible. North-facing woodland slopes usually have more wildflowers since they are more moist. Woodland flowers usually bloom before the leaves come out on the trees. The flowers are often pale in color --- white, pink, and yellow --- to attract bees and butterflies as their pollinators. Since bees cannot see red or orange, there are very few woodland flowers those colors. Maroon-colored flowers often have an unpleasant odor to attract flies, beetles, and ants to spread their pollen.

Many springtime roadside flowers are "alien" plants (not native), they were brought here from Europe, China, Japan, or other lands. Invasive non-natives, such as Japanese honeysuckle, kudzu, garlic mustard, purple loosestrife, and ground ivy can become serious weeds which compete with or choke out desirable native plants.



Woodlands

White flowers

Yellow, orange

Pink, red, maroon, brown

Blue, Purple, Green


Fields, Roadsides, Yards

White flowers

Yellow, orange

Pink, red, maroon, brown

Blue, Purple, Green







Webpage: Spring