Birds I - Birds of Prey, Shore Birds, Herons, Cranes

Image Number Image (Click to Enlarge)CaptionImage Viewed
1 I photographed this <strong>Red-tailed Hawk</strong> (<em>Buteo jamaicensis</em>) at Burgess Falls State Park. It was an unreleasable bird, having been previously injured. Park rangers often use such birds for educating visitors. These beautiful birds ...

I photographed this Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) at Burgess Falls State Park. It was an unreleasable bird, having been previously injured. Park rangers often use such birds for educating visitors. These beautiful birds ...

I photographed this Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) at Burgess Falls State Park. It was an unreleasable bird, having been previously injured. Park rangers often use such birds for educating visitors. These beautiful birds of prey are protected by law, for good reason, they eat lots of mice, rats, voles, and other rodents. They can often be seen soaring high in the sky searching for prey. The "eyebrow" is like a sunscreen for the hawk to protect its eyes from glare as it flies. It gives hawks and eagles a "mean" or serious look. The sharp, hooked beak is used for tearing the flesh from their prey; unlike owls, they do not swallow their prey whole. Buteo comes from the Latin word that means falcon or hawk. The birds in the group are medium to small birds that have short tails and long, broad rounded wings. They are often seen soaring high in the sky as they float on the uprising thermals in the summer. 3288
2 This is why it is called a "Red-tailed" Hawk.

This is why it is called a "Red-tailed" Hawk.

This is why it is called a "Red-tailed" Hawk. 2066
3 This Hawk is "manteling" as a method of protecting her food, a mouse.

This Hawk is "manteling" as a method of protecting her food, a mouse.

This Hawk is "manteling" as a method of protecting her food, a mouse. 2106
4 Hawk wing feathers differ from owl feathers because they have a very sharp edge. Hawks are day flying birds, they don't rely on stealth to catch their prey. Owls have an uneven, feathered edge on their wing feathers allowing them to fly silently. I fou...

Hawk wing feathers differ from owl feathers because they have a very sharp edge. Hawks are day flying birds, they don't rely on stealth to catch their prey. Owls have an uneven, feathered edge on their wing feathers allowing them to fly silently. I fou...

Hawk wing feathers differ from owl feathers because they have a very sharp edge. Hawks are day flying birds, they don't rely on stealth to catch their prey. Owls have an uneven, feathered edge on their wing feathers allowing them to fly silently. I found this one on the ground at Colditz Cove State Natural Area. I left it where I found it because it is against the law to posess feathers from birds of prey without having a permit. 2080
5 Side by side comparison of Owl (l) and Hawk (r) feathers. Notice the feathered edges on the owl feather.

Side by side comparison of Owl (l) and Hawk (r) feathers. Notice the feathered edges on the owl feather.

Side by side comparison of Owl (l) and Hawk (r) feathers. Notice the feathered edges on the owl feather. 3719
6 I spotted this aerial "dogfight" between a <strong>Red-tailed hawk and crow</strong> while a taking photos at the Oak Ridge Marina at Melton Hill Lake. It is amazing how smaller birds will often harrass larger birds in flight (sometimes crows are the "...

I spotted this aerial "dogfight" between a Red-tailed hawk and crow while a taking photos at the Oak Ridge Marina at Melton Hill Lake. It is amazing how smaller birds will often harrass larger birds in flight (sometimes crows are the "...

I spotted this aerial "dogfight" between a Red-tailed hawk and crow while a taking photos at the Oak Ridge Marina at Melton Hill Lake. It is amazing how smaller birds will often harrass larger birds in flight (sometimes crows are the "harasees")! The hawk could have easily made a quick meal out of the crow if it had caught it! 2090
7 I heard a commotion of cawing crows in our neighbor's yard one morning. I looked out and saw several Crows taunting a Red-tailed Hawk sitting in dead tree. It was interesting that other birds heard the distress calls of the crows and joined in on the a...

I heard a commotion of cawing crows in our neighbor's yard one morning. I looked out and saw several Crows taunting a Red-tailed Hawk sitting in dead tree. It was interesting that other birds heard the distress calls of the crows and joined in on the a...

I heard a commotion of cawing crows in our neighbor's yard one morning. I looked out and saw several Crows taunting a Red-tailed Hawk sitting in dead tree. It was interesting that other birds heard the distress calls of the crows and joined in on the action! This photo shows the crow and 10 Starlings. Two Cardinals had been in the tree a few minutes earlier. Once when a co-worker had a Barred Owl sitting on a perch at science camp we started hearing the distress call of a robin, within minutes there were numerous different species of birds in the trees nearby adding their support! 1932
8 <strong>Sharp-shinned Hawk</strong>
<em>Accipiter striatus</em>
I shot this picture from the window of my classroom at school while I was watching for the albino Blue Jay that I had spotted earlier. Fortunately, it was flying high in the sky, these b...

Sharp-shinned Hawk Accipiter striatus I shot this picture from the window of my classroom at school while I was watching for the albino Blue Jay that I had spotted earlier. Fortunately, it was flying high in the sky, these b...

Sharp-shinned Hawk Accipiter striatus I shot this picture from the window of my classroom at school while I was watching for the albino Blue Jay that I had spotted earlier. Fortunately, it was flying high in the sky, these birds are known to kill smaller birds at feeders. It can be easy to confuse a Sharp-shinned hawk with a Cooper's hawk. One indicator is the shape of the tail, if it is squared, it is a Sharp-shinned. The second indicator is the way the head doesn't extend much past the wings. 2206
9 Sharp-shinned Hawk

Sharp-shinned Hawk

Sharp-shinned Hawk 1644
10 Speaking of bird killers, this white cat is beautiful, but deadly. It is checking out the birds at the feeder near our house. Outdoor cats are the worst enemy of birds, small rodents, butterflies, and other small animals. Every year millions of animals...

Speaking of bird killers, this white cat is beautiful, but deadly. It is checking out the birds at the feeder near our house. Outdoor cats are the worst enemy of birds, small rodents, butterflies, and other small animals. Every year millions of animals...

Speaking of bird killers, this white cat is beautiful, but deadly. It is checking out the birds at the feeder near our house. Outdoor cats are the worst enemy of birds, small rodents, butterflies, and other small animals. Every year millions of animals are killed by cats that are allowed to roam free outdoors. Many owners talk about how cute it is when their cat brings a squirrel, rabbit, vole, etc. to their doorstep, to me it is just one less small animal to live! 3233
11 This beautiful little <strong>Kestrel</strong> (<em>Falco sparverius</em>) was photographed during a bird program at Ijams Nature Center. These are the smallest of the falcons and are often called "Sparrow Hawks". They eat grasshoppers, small rodents, ...

This beautiful little Kestrel (Falco sparverius) was photographed during a bird program at Ijams Nature Center. These are the smallest of the falcons and are often called "Sparrow Hawks". They eat grasshoppers, small rodents, ...

This beautiful little Kestrel (Falco sparverius) was photographed during a bird program at Ijams Nature Center. These are the smallest of the falcons and are often called "Sparrow Hawks". They eat grasshoppers, small rodents, and even small birds. The black lines under the eyes are used to cut down on glare, much like how football players put black patches under their eyes. Falcons have a long tail, long, pointed wings and can dive at very high speeds. 2310
12 This photo shows how small the Kestrel is. Even a hawk this little has to be held carefully by the handler with a glove, those tiny talons are sharp!

This photo shows how small the Kestrel is. Even a hawk this little has to be held carefully by the handler with a glove, those tiny talons are sharp!

This photo shows how small the Kestrel is. Even a hawk this little has to be held carefully by the handler with a glove, those tiny talons are sharp! 1960
13 This <strong>Osprey</strong> (<em>Pandion haliaetus</em>) nest is located on a utility pole along Melton Hill Lake in Oak Ridge. The mother is very protective of her young, she is quite unhappy when we arrive for Science Camp each June, she flies over ...

This Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) nest is located on a utility pole along Melton Hill Lake in Oak Ridge. The mother is very protective of her young, she is quite unhappy when we arrive for Science Camp each June, she flies over ...

This Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) nest is located on a utility pole along Melton Hill Lake in Oak Ridge. The mother is very protective of her young, she is quite unhappy when we arrive for Science Camp each June, she flies over the nest and calls loudly. We once saw an osprey knock a great blue heron from the air into the lake when the heron flew over the nest one too many times. We were amazed that the osprey continued to harass the heron for several minutes as it struggled to "swim" 100 yards or so to shore. Where was the "Crocodile Hunter," Steve Irwin's, camera crew when we needed them!? :) Ospreys are easy to differentate from hawks, eagles, or vultures by the "crook" in the wings. They hover over the water and dive down feet-first to catch fish with their sharp talons. It is interesting to see how they fly turning the fish headfirst to make it more aerodynamic. One year the male osprey was blown out of this nest during a violent storm. He broke his wing when he hit it on the guywire. The next morning some of my students found him sitting on the ground. A wildlife officer was nearby, so he took the bird to a rehabilitation center. Unfortunatley, the bird was too severely injured to save. 2510
14 <strong>Osprey</strong>
<em>Pandion haliaetus</em>
Ft. Loudon Dam - Lenoir City, TN
August 12, 2007
Ospreys are sometimes called "fish hawks" because of their habit of hovering over a lake or river in search of fish. Like hawks, owls, eagles, and f...

Osprey Pandion haliaetus Ft. Loudon Dam - Lenoir City, TN August 12, 2007 Ospreys are sometimes called "fish hawks" because of their habit of hovering over a lake or river in search of fish. Like hawks, owls, eagles, and f...

Osprey Pandion haliaetus Ft. Loudon Dam - Lenoir City, TN August 12, 2007 Ospreys are sometimes called "fish hawks" because of their habit of hovering over a lake or river in search of fish. Like hawks, owls, eagles, and falcons, they are raptors or birds of prey. Ospreys can be easily identified by the sharp bend at the "elbow" in the wing. Other soaring birds have straight wings. These birds are very protective of their nests and will make loud, short chirps when disturbed or threatened. 2327
15 This Osprey was fishing in the river below the Ft. Loudon dam. It came up "empty taloned" this time. When ospreys do catch a fish, they turn it head-first into the wind so it will be streamlined and easier to fly off to the nest.
Ospreys were endanger...

This Osprey was fishing in the river below the Ft. Loudon dam. It came up "empty taloned" this time. When ospreys do catch a fish, they turn it head-first into the wind so it will be streamlined and easier to fly off to the nest. Ospreys were endanger...

This Osprey was fishing in the river below the Ft. Loudon dam. It came up "empty taloned" this time. When ospreys do catch a fish, they turn it head-first into the wind so it will be streamlined and easier to fly off to the nest. Ospreys were endangered during the 1970's. Before the insecticide DDT was banned they had high levels of the chemical in their bodies from the fish that they ate. DDT worked its way up the food chain and eventually into the top predators. The chemical caused thinning of the birds' egg shells, when the parents sat on the eggs they often cracked, resulting in the death of the developing chicks. 2153
16 <b>Osprey with fish</b>

Osprey with fish

Osprey with fish My son's girlfriend, Jeanie (in 2008), spotted this Osprey carrying a fish back to its nest while we were at Pt. Reyes National Seashore in California. 1518
17 <strong>Bald Eagle</strong>
<em>Haliaeetus leucocephalus</em>
Munson, FL
March 16, 2008

What a surprise it was when the "Vulture" I thought I was looking at turned out to have a white head and tail when I zoomed in on it with my telephoto lens! W...

Bald Eagle Haliaeetus leucocephalus Munson, FL March 16, 2008 What a surprise it was when the "Vulture" I thought I was looking at turned out to have a white head and tail when I zoomed in on it with my telephoto lens! W...

Bald Eagle Haliaeetus leucocephalus Munson, FL March 16, 2008 What a surprise it was when the "Vulture" I thought I was looking at turned out to have a white head and tail when I zoomed in on it with my telephoto lens! We saw lots of eagles in Alaska, but it is still rare to see them in the southeast. It is wonderful to see these magnificent birds making a comeback in the "Lower 48"! 1887
18 <strong>Screech Owl</strong>
<em>Megascops asio</em>
This is another "cheater" photo! I took this one at science camp when one of my co-workers who is a wildlife rehabilitator / educator brought this bird to share with the campers. She calls him "Hou...

Screech Owl Megascops asio This is another "cheater" photo! I took this one at science camp when one of my co-workers who is a wildlife rehabilitator / educator brought this bird to share with the campers. She calls him "Hou...

Screech Owl Megascops asio This is another "cheater" photo! I took this one at science camp when one of my co-workers who is a wildlife rehabilitator / educator brought this bird to share with the campers. She calls him "Houdini" because he is so well camouflaged and can easily hide in the branches of a tree. This poor little owl is unreleasable because it has just one eye, it lost the other in a collision with a car. Screech owls are tiny, just 6 - 10 inches tall and 1/4th to 1/2 pound in weight, but what they lack in size, they make up in bravado! They will vigorously defend their territory by swooping at people who venture too close to their nest. There are gray and reddish-brown varieties of this owl. Unlike most other owls, Screech owls do not make a "whooo" sound, their call is a spine-tingling screech! 2106
19 This photo shows how well camouflaged Houdini the Screech Owl is when he is next to a tree! How many screech owls have you passed by in the woods?

This photo shows how well camouflaged Houdini the Screech Owl is when he is next to a tree! How many screech owls have you passed by in the woods?

This photo shows how well camouflaged Houdini the Screech Owl is when he is next to a tree! How many screech owls have you passed by in the woods? 3536
20 <strong>Barred Owl</strong>
<em>Strix varia</em>
The Barred Owl is common in east Tennessee. I photographed this one at Frozen Head State Park during a ranger presentation. It was injured as a youngster when it became tangled in a barbed wire fence, ...

Barred Owl Strix varia The Barred Owl is common in east Tennessee. I photographed this one at Frozen Head State Park during a ranger presentation. It was injured as a youngster when it became tangled in a barbed wire fence, ...

Barred Owl Strix varia The Barred Owl is common in east Tennessee. I photographed this one at Frozen Head State Park during a ranger presentation. It was injured as a youngster when it became tangled in a barbed wire fence, the damaged wing had to be removed. I once called up one of these owls while leading a naturalist hike at Tremont in the Great Smoky Mountains. My fellow hikers and I were amazed when a large owl flew silently into a nearby tree. The call of the Barred Owl sounds like, "Who, who cooks for you? Who cooks for you all?" They must be southern owls! :) These owls are helpful predators, they eat mice, rats, squirrels, and snakes. Owls can't turn their heads all the way around as some people mistakenly believe. Being nocturnal, owls have large eyes so they can take in small amounts of light, even from the stars. They have such big eyes they can't move them, so they turn their head. The ears of owls are asymmetrical (one higher than the other) so they can triangulate to find their prey at night. 2557
21 I was so excited to finally get a chance to photograph a Barred Owl in its natural habitat, not sitting on a perch or on a ranger's arm! One of the rangers at Frozen Head State Park showed us this beautiful owl he had spotted earlier in the day. This s...

I was so excited to finally get a chance to photograph a Barred Owl in its natural habitat, not sitting on a perch or on a ranger's arm! One of the rangers at Frozen Head State Park showed us this beautiful owl he had spotted earlier in the day. This s...

I was so excited to finally get a chance to photograph a Barred Owl in its natural habitat, not sitting on a perch or on a ranger's arm! One of the rangers at Frozen Head State Park showed us this beautiful owl he had spotted earlier in the day. This shows why snags of dead or damaged trees are so important for wildlife. This owl may nest in this decayed Beech tree and raise the next generation of owls here! Owls' nests can often be found because of owl pellets on the ground near the tree. Owls cannot digest feathers, fur or bones, so they regurgitate (throw up) them in little packets. Owl pellets can be dissected to see what the birds have eaten since the bones are still intact. 1651
22 The ranger had his spotting scope available for visitors to see the owl. I put my camera up to the eyepiece and managed to get this photo (taken at 40x magnification). It was a cool February day, so the owl had fluffed his (or her, I can't tell the dif...

The ranger had his spotting scope available for visitors to see the owl. I put my camera up to the eyepiece and managed to get this photo (taken at 40x magnification). It was a cool February day, so the owl had fluffed his (or her, I can't tell the dif...

The ranger had his spotting scope available for visitors to see the owl. I put my camera up to the eyepiece and managed to get this photo (taken at 40x magnification). It was a cool February day, so the owl had fluffed his (or her, I can't tell the difference!) feathers to trap in air to stay warm. What a wonderful treat it was to see this owl! Earlier we had also seen a Pileated woodpecker and a coyote. It was a very good day for spotting wildlife! :) 1801
23 <strong>Great Horned Owl</strong>
<em>Bubo virginianus</em>
The Great Horned Owl is larger than the Barred Owl. I photographed this beautiful bird at the Chattanooga Nature Center. The owl doesn't have horns or external ears, only feather tufts used ...

Great Horned Owl Bubo virginianus The Great Horned Owl is larger than the Barred Owl. I photographed this beautiful bird at the Chattanooga Nature Center. The owl doesn't have horns or external ears, only feather tufts used ...

Great Horned Owl Bubo virginianus The Great Horned Owl is larger than the Barred Owl. I photographed this beautiful bird at the Chattanooga Nature Center. The owl doesn't have horns or external ears, only feather tufts used in camouflage. 3356
24 This one-eyed Great Horned owl, injured when it was young, lives in an enclosure at Frozen Head and is used in ranger-led programs. It is not hard to understand why people who handle birds of prey have to wear heavy gloves! The owl's beak and talons wo...

This one-eyed Great Horned owl, injured when it was young, lives in an enclosure at Frozen Head and is used in ranger-led programs. It is not hard to understand why people who handle birds of prey have to wear heavy gloves! The owl's beak and talons wo...

This one-eyed Great Horned owl, injured when it was young, lives in an enclosure at Frozen Head and is used in ranger-led programs. It is not hard to understand why people who handle birds of prey have to wear heavy gloves! The owl's beak and talons would easily pierce the handler's skin and muscle. 1963
25 A <strong>Barred Owl skeleton</strong>
Look at the large eye sockets of this owl's skull. Birds have hollow bones to make them lighter. They have the same bones as we do, they are just different length and sizes.

A Barred Owl skeleton Look at the large eye sockets of this owl's skull. Birds have hollow bones to make them lighter. They have the same bones as we do, they are just different length and sizes.

A Barred Owl skeleton Look at the large eye sockets of this owl's skull. Birds have hollow bones to make them lighter. They have the same bones as we do, they are just different length and sizes. 5030
26 I like this Owl Poem, it should make us humans think!

I like this Owl Poem, it should make us humans think!

I like this Owl Poem, it should make us humans think! 2525
27 This pair of <strong>Mallard ducks</strong> (<em>Anas platyrhynchos</em>) was photographed at Melton Hill Lake in Oak Ridge. When the male is situated at the right angle it is easy to see the spectacular blue-green hue from the refracted light on the f...

This pair of Mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) was photographed at Melton Hill Lake in Oak Ridge. When the male is situated at the right angle it is easy to see the spectacular blue-green hue from the refracted light on the f...

This pair of Mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) was photographed at Melton Hill Lake in Oak Ridge. When the male is situated at the right angle it is easy to see the spectacular blue-green hue from the refracted light on the feathers of the head. Female mallards are drab brown, well camouflaged from predators when they sit on their nest. They (and the many other ducks and geese) didn't stick around long when the realized they weren't going to get fed! Feeding wild animals human food (bread!) is bad for their health and in some cases can be fatal. 1927
28 This male <strong>Mallard duck</strong> (<em>Anas platyrhynchos</em>) is swimming in the sun, you can see the beautiful colors refracted by the feathers on his head. Note the little curl of feathers on the tail.

This male Mallard duck (Anas platyrhynchos) is swimming in the sun, you can see the beautiful colors refracted by the feathers on his head. Note the little curl of feathers on the tail.

This male Mallard duck (Anas platyrhynchos) is swimming in the sun, you can see the beautiful colors refracted by the feathers on his head. Note the little curl of feathers on the tail. 2155
29 This Mallard drake is "preening", or cleaning his feathers. Since ducks use their feathers for floating on the water, they have to keep them free of dirt and parasites. They must keep the feathers oiled and waterproof in order to float and stay dry. Du...

This Mallard drake is "preening", or cleaning his feathers. Since ducks use their feathers for floating on the water, they have to keep them free of dirt and parasites. They must keep the feathers oiled and waterproof in order to float and stay dry. Du...

This Mallard drake is "preening", or cleaning his feathers. Since ducks use their feathers for floating on the water, they have to keep them free of dirt and parasites. They must keep the feathers oiled and waterproof in order to float and stay dry. Ducks have a uropygial gland near the tail that secretes oils and waxes that the duck spreads over the feathers with its bill. Oil spills are devastating to water birds because they are unable to clean their feathers, if they try to, they eat the oil, which can be fatal. 2700
30 Wow, this single mom Mallard has 11 ducklings to keep up with! Many of these cute little birds will probably not survive, some will be eaten by predators. This is one reason these ducks have such large broods. The ducklings are well camouflaged to help...

Wow, this single mom Mallard has 11 ducklings to keep up with! Many of these cute little birds will probably not survive, some will be eaten by predators. This is one reason these ducks have such large broods. The ducklings are well camouflaged to help...

Wow, this single mom Mallard has 11 ducklings to keep up with! Many of these cute little birds will probably not survive, some will be eaten by predators. This is one reason these ducks have such large broods. The ducklings are well camouflaged to help them survive in their environment. 4250
31 Mallard ducklings are <em>precocious</em>, meaning they hatch fully developed and ready to take on the world.

Mallard ducklings are precocious, meaning they hatch fully developed and ready to take on the world.

Mallard ducklings are precocious, meaning they hatch fully developed and ready to take on the world. 1535
32 <strong>Wood Duck</strong> - male, breeding plumage 
<em>Aix sponsa</em>
I photographed this beautiful duck in an exhibit at the Tennessee Aquarium in Chattanooga. He has the striking colors to attract a female. (The female was nearby, but she was mo...

Wood Duck - male, breeding plumage Aix sponsa I photographed this beautiful duck in an exhibit at the Tennessee Aquarium in Chattanooga. He has the striking colors to attract a female. (The female was nearby, but she was mo...

Wood Duck - male, breeding plumage Aix sponsa I photographed this beautiful duck in an exhibit at the Tennessee Aquarium in Chattanooga. He has the striking colors to attract a female. (The female was nearby, but she was more interested in preening than paying attention to him!) 1835
33 <strong>Wood Duck</strong> - female 
<em>Aix sponsa</em>
This duck was photographed at the TN Aquarium in Chattanooga. She had been preening, so I had trouble getting a good picture.

Wood Duck - female Aix sponsa This duck was photographed at the TN Aquarium in Chattanooga. She had been preening, so I had trouble getting a good picture.

Wood Duck - female Aix sponsa This duck was photographed at the TN Aquarium in Chattanooga. She had been preening, so I had trouble getting a good picture. 1506
34 This strange-looking duck is a "<strong>Muscovy Duck</strong>" (<em>Cairina moschata</em>). It is probably an escaped or released pet duck since they are not normally found in the wild. Sometimes they will breed with other ducks, resulting in some <u>r...

This strange-looking duck is a "Muscovy Duck" (Cairina moschata). It is probably an escaped or released pet duck since they are not normally found in the wild. Sometimes they will breed with other ducks, resulting in some r...

This strange-looking duck is a "Muscovy Duck" (Cairina moschata). It is probably an escaped or released pet duck since they are not normally found in the wild. Sometimes they will breed with other ducks, resulting in some really "ugly ducklings"! I did see a duck that appeared to be a cross between one of these and a Mallard. Actually, the ducklings of this type of duck is yellow and brown, they don't have the red patch of skin. Only males have the red patches, what a strange type of "makeup"! According to a website I found, these ducks are "quackless". They can be aggressive, another good reason not to feed the wildlife! 2106
35 I call this the "Elvis duck" because of the upswept look of the feathers on its head.  It is a Moscovy duck, it sure is wild looking! The body feathers had a pretty green sheen.

I call this the "Elvis duck" because of the upswept look of the feathers on its head. It is a Moscovy duck, it sure is wild looking! The body feathers had a pretty green sheen.

I call this the "Elvis duck" because of the upswept look of the feathers on its head. It is a Moscovy duck, it sure is wild looking! The body feathers had a pretty green sheen. 1656
36 One of the favorite activities of young children is to feed ducks. The ducks, geese, and coots in Oak Ridge are well-trained, as soon as they see people walk out onto the dock they quickly paddle up to see if they can get a handout!

One of the favorite activities of young children is to feed ducks. The ducks, geese, and coots in Oak Ridge are well-trained, as soon as they see people walk out onto the dock they quickly paddle up to see if they can get a handout!

One of the favorite activities of young children is to feed ducks. The ducks, geese, and coots in Oak Ridge are well-trained, as soon as they see people walk out onto the dock they quickly paddle up to see if they can get a handout! 1491
37 I hope those french fries are trans-fat free!

I hope those french fries are trans-fat free!

I hope those french fries are trans-fat free! 1509
38 <strong>Canada geese</strong> 
<em>Branta canadensis</em>
Canada Geese were re-introduced into the east TN area and they have found the lakes, ponds, parks, lawns, and docks very much to their liking. In fact, they like it here so much, they have bec...

Canada geese Branta canadensis Canada Geese were re-introduced into the east TN area and they have found the lakes, ponds, parks, lawns, and docks very much to their liking. In fact, they like it here so much, they have bec...

Canada geese Branta canadensis Canada Geese were re-introduced into the east TN area and they have found the lakes, ponds, parks, lawns, and docks very much to their liking. In fact, they like it here so much, they have become permanent residents (or "pests" if they mess up your yard or dock with their droppings!). In the fall they honk and will fly around in the "V," but they don't go anywhere. Researchers often tag the adult geese with large neck bands and leg bands. One of my students once found a dead goose with a metal leg band. I sent the number on the band to the address in Washington D.C., a couple of months later I received a letter telling that the goose had been banded a mile or so away! During the time the geese lay their eggs in March, they begin to molt their flight feathers. The parents are unable to fly for several weeks. They often lay a large clutch of eggs and start out with a big family. However, as the weeks pass, some of the goslings fall prey to predators such as foxes, turtles, and even large fish! This photo shows the size comparison of the Canada gosling to mallard ducklings. 1695
39 This <strong>Canada Goose</strong> (<em>Branta canadensis</em>) parent is showing displeasure that I am nearby. I tried to be still and quiet so I could avoid disturbing them too much. The parents dip their head up and down, crooking their neck as a si...

This Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) parent is showing displeasure that I am nearby. I tried to be still and quiet so I could avoid disturbing them too much. The parents dip their head up and down, crooking their neck as a si...

This Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) parent is showing displeasure that I am nearby. I tried to be still and quiet so I could avoid disturbing them too much. The parents dip their head up and down, crooking their neck as a signal that they are upset. In March, the geese pair off and lay their eggs. The goslings hatch in April. The babies are very cute and fuzzy, but don't be tempted to pet them, Mom and Dad will protect them; if you don't know what it means to be "goosed", you'll find out! :) Canada geese have become a problem in many areas, they don't migrate from east Tennessee in the winter. They pollute water and contaminate grassy areas and marina docks with their droppings. 3225
40 This little fuzzy Canada gosling was the only one of its clutch that survived. Canada geese lay large clutches of eggs and often start out with 6 - 8 babies. The goslings often fall prey to snakes, foxes, coyotes, snapping turtles, and even large fish.

This little fuzzy Canada gosling was the only one of its clutch that survived. Canada geese lay large clutches of eggs and often start out with 6 - 8 babies. The goslings often fall prey to snakes, foxes, coyotes, snapping turtles, and even large fish.

This little fuzzy Canada gosling was the only one of its clutch that survived. Canada geese lay large clutches of eggs and often start out with 6 - 8 babies. The goslings often fall prey to snakes, foxes, coyotes, snapping turtles, and even large fish. 1510
41 A Canada Goose with an attitude!

A Canada Goose with an attitude!

A Canada Goose with an attitude! 1561
42 I saw this banded Canada Goose at Clark Center Park in Oak Ridge.

I saw this banded Canada Goose at Clark Center Park in Oak Ridge.

I saw this banded Canada Goose at Clark Center Park in Oak Ridge. 1911
43 This is why many people don't like Canada geese! I tell my students that Goose poop is just "recycled grass"! :)

This is why many people don't like Canada geese! I tell my students that Goose poop is just "recycled grass"! :)

This is why many people don't like Canada geese! I tell my students that Goose poop is just "recycled grass"! :) 2885
44 These <strong>Lesser Scaups</strong> (<em>Aythya affinis</em>) were photographed during a hike at Haw Ridge in April 2006. My camera doesn't do well at long distances and it is even <u>worse</u> when the subjects are moving!

These Lesser Scaups (Aythya affinis) were photographed during a hike at Haw Ridge in April 2006. My camera doesn't do well at long distances and it is even worse when the subjects are moving!

These Lesser Scaups (Aythya affinis) were photographed during a hike at Haw Ridge in April 2006. My camera doesn't do well at long distances and it is even worse when the subjects are moving! 2030
45 <strong>American Coot</strong>
<em>Fulica americana</em>
I photographed this Coot at the Oak Ridge Marina at Melton Hill Lake in late February 2007. Note the feet on this bird. Unlike most water birds, Coots don't have webbed feet, they have 3 webbed...

American Coot Fulica americana I photographed this Coot at the Oak Ridge Marina at Melton Hill Lake in late February 2007. Note the feet on this bird. Unlike most water birds, Coots don't have webbed feet, they have 3 webbed...

American Coot Fulica americana I photographed this Coot at the Oak Ridge Marina at Melton Hill Lake in late February 2007. Note the feet on this bird. Unlike most water birds, Coots don't have webbed feet, they have 3 webbed toes. They are plant eaters and often eat aquatic plants, but they will nibble on grass and seeds on the land too. It can be a challenge to watch them as they often dive under the water. 2006
46 A Coot diving

A Coot diving

A Coot diving 1400
47 This is a great view of the Coot's feet! This is also what I can do with my new camera and 70-300mm lens! :) I realized I should have used my polarizer after I got home and downloaded my photos!

This is a great view of the Coot's feet! This is also what I can do with my new camera and 70-300mm lens! :) I realized I should have used my polarizer after I got home and downloaded my photos!

This is a great view of the Coot's feet! This is also what I can do with my new camera and 70-300mm lens! :) I realized I should have used my polarizer after I got home and downloaded my photos! 2729
48 A Coot in the water. The white beak of the coots makes them easy to identify. They are also smaller than ducks and many other water birds.

A Coot in the water. The white beak of the coots makes them easy to identify. They are also smaller than ducks and many other water birds.

A Coot in the water. The white beak of the coots makes them easy to identify. They are also smaller than ducks and many other water birds. 2218
49 <strong>Common Loon</strong>
<em>Gavia immer</em>
Ft. Loudon Lake, Knoxville, TN
May 13, 2007
Boy, what a lousy time not to have my telephoto lens handy! :( Loons are usually thought of as being northern birds. They have a haunting call that echoes...

Common Loon Gavia immer Ft. Loudon Lake, Knoxville, TN May 13, 2007 Boy, what a lousy time not to have my telephoto lens handy! :( Loons are usually thought of as being northern birds. They have a haunting call that echoes...

Common Loon Gavia immer Ft. Loudon Lake, Knoxville, TN May 13, 2007 Boy, what a lousy time not to have my telephoto lens handy! :( Loons are usually thought of as being northern birds. They have a haunting call that echoes across the lake. 1876
50 <strong>Double-crested Cormorant</strong>
<em>Phalacrocorax auritus</em>
Ft. Loudon Dam - Lenoir City, TN
August 12, 2007

Double-crested Cormorant Phalacrocorax auritus Ft. Loudon Dam - Lenoir City, TN August 12, 2007

Double-crested Cormorant Phalacrocorax auritus Ft. Loudon Dam - Lenoir City, TN August 12, 2007 1694
51 I photographed these Cormorants on a log in Melton Hill Lake in Oak Ridge on June 26, 2008.

I photographed these Cormorants on a log in Melton Hill Lake in Oak Ridge on June 26, 2008.

I photographed these Cormorants on a log in Melton Hill Lake in Oak Ridge on June 26, 2008. 1495
52 I photographed these Cormorants fishing in Bear Lake in Munson, FL. These birds swim partially submersed with just their head and neck above the surface. When they dive they will reemerge in a different place, making them a challenge to observe.

I photographed these Cormorants fishing in Bear Lake in Munson, FL. These birds swim partially submersed with just their head and neck above the surface. When they dive they will reemerge in a different place, making them a challenge to observe.

I photographed these Cormorants fishing in Bear Lake in Munson, FL. These birds swim partially submersed with just their head and neck above the surface. When they dive they will reemerge in a different place, making them a challenge to observe. 1475
53 <strong>Belted Kingfisher</strong>
<em>Megaceryle alcyon</em>
This is a tightly cropped shot of the kingfisher. They are nervous birds and I was not able to get close enough for a clear shot before it took off. I enjoy watching them and hearing their...

Belted Kingfisher Megaceryle alcyon This is a tightly cropped shot of the kingfisher. They are nervous birds and I was not able to get close enough for a clear shot before it took off. I enjoy watching them and hearing their...

Belted Kingfisher Megaceryle alcyon This is a tightly cropped shot of the kingfisher. They are nervous birds and I was not able to get close enough for a clear shot before it took off. I enjoy watching them and hearing their unique call. 1863
54 <strong>Ring-billed Gulls</strong> 
<em>Larus delawarensis</em>
Oak Ridge, TN
February 2007

These gulls were seen at the Oak Ridge Marina. Ring-billed gulls are commonly seen along the rivers in east Tennessee in the winter. It is not unusual to ...

Ring-billed Gulls Larus delawarensis Oak Ridge, TN February 2007 These gulls were seen at the Oak Ridge Marina. Ring-billed gulls are commonly seen along the rivers in east Tennessee in the winter. It is not unusual to ...

Ring-billed Gulls Larus delawarensis Oak Ridge, TN February 2007 These gulls were seen at the Oak Ridge Marina. Ring-billed gulls are commonly seen along the rivers in east Tennessee in the winter. It is not unusual to see them in large parking lots in search of leftover scraps of food. Sometimes gulls are called "rats with wings" because of their scavenging habits. Many types of gulls have a red spot on the lower beak where the chicks peck to get a regurgitated meal. This gull does have more than one leg! Gulls often pull one foot up and stand on the other one. This was not a cold day, so it wasn't to keep its foot warm. 1768
55 Sometimes I get a special treat when I am looking for wildflowers! This beautiful <strong>Black-crowned Night Heron</strong> (<em>Nycticorax nycticorax</em>) startled me with its loud "quawk!" distress call as I hiked a trail at Haw Ridge. Fortunately,...

Sometimes I get a special treat when I am looking for wildflowers! This beautiful Black-crowned Night Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) startled me with its loud "quawk!" distress call as I hiked a trail at Haw Ridge. Fortunately,...

Sometimes I get a special treat when I am looking for wildflowers! This beautiful Black-crowned Night Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) startled me with its loud "quawk!" distress call as I hiked a trail at Haw Ridge. Fortunately, I had my tripod, because I had to zoom in as far as my camera will go to get this photo. These herons have a short neck, unlike the long-necked blue herons. These birds eat fish, crabs, mollusks, bird eggs, small mammals, young birds, amphibians, and some invertebrates. 2528
56 <strong>Black-crowned Night-Heron</strong>
<em>Nycticorax nycticorax</em>
Ft. Loudon Dam - Lenoir City, TN
August 12, 2007
My husband spotted this bird while I was at another area of the trail below the dam photographing ospreys. He used some elabo...

Black-crowned Night-Heron Nycticorax nycticorax Ft. Loudon Dam - Lenoir City, TN August 12, 2007 My husband spotted this bird while I was at another area of the trail below the dam photographing ospreys. He used some elabo...

Black-crowned Night-Heron Nycticorax nycticorax Ft. Loudon Dam - Lenoir City, TN August 12, 2007 My husband spotted this bird while I was at another area of the trail below the dam photographing ospreys. He used some elaborate hand signals to let me know he had seen something interesting without making any noise. I was thrilled that this bird did not fly away when I approached. These herons are much smaller than Great Blue Herons. They are common birds, but since they feed at dusk and at night, they are not seen as often. During our science camp at the lake, we often see them flying back to their roost about 8:30 in the morning. 1939
57 <strong>Green Heron</strong>
<em>Butorides virescens</em>
June 14, 2007
This Green Heron was standing at a popular fishing spot where I usually see humans trying to catch a meal! These herons are much smaller than the Great Blues or Night Herons. On...

Green Heron Butorides virescens June 14, 2007 This Green Heron was standing at a popular fishing spot where I usually see humans trying to catch a meal! These herons are much smaller than the Great Blues or Night Herons. On...

Green Heron Butorides virescens June 14, 2007 This Green Heron was standing at a popular fishing spot where I usually see humans trying to catch a meal! These herons are much smaller than the Great Blues or Night Herons. One guide states that they are about the size of a large crow. I was happy to get this photo, I just needed this bird to have my "heron collection" complete. 2030
58 <strong>Great Blue Heron</strong> 
<em>Ardea herodias</em> 
This beautiful Great Blue Heron was resting along a cove of Lake Loudon in Knoxville, TN.  These birds are sometimes mistakenly called "cranes". Herons eat fish, frogs, crayfish, and small e...

Great Blue Heron Ardea herodias This beautiful Great Blue Heron was resting along a cove of Lake Loudon in Knoxville, TN. These birds are sometimes mistakenly called "cranes". Herons eat fish, frogs, crayfish, and small e...

Great Blue Heron Ardea herodias This beautiful Great Blue Heron was resting along a cove of Lake Loudon in Knoxville, TN. These birds are sometimes mistakenly called "cranes". Herons eat fish, frogs, crayfish, and small eels. Cranes are not the same birds as Blue Herons! I recently saw a road in a swanky new neighborhood in west Knox county called Blue Crane Rd.! Aaugh! :0 5229
59 I startled this <strong>Great Blue Heron</strong> when it heard the motor on my camera as I zoomed in to get a closer picture. I liked the patterns of the ripples on the water. This photo is available for sale on the Printroom.com link, if I sell enoug...

I startled this Great Blue Heron when it heard the motor on my camera as I zoomed in to get a closer picture. I liked the patterns of the ripples on the water. This photo is available for sale on the Printroom.com link, if I sell enoug...

I startled this Great Blue Heron when it heard the motor on my camera as I zoomed in to get a closer picture. I liked the patterns of the ripples on the water. This photo is available for sale on the Printroom.com link, if I sell enough of them, maybe I can afford to get a good digital SLR with a strong telephoto lens! ;) 1862
60 We had to do a quick turn-around when I saw a tree full of nesting Great Blue Herons on an island in the Holston River in Kingsport, TN. This is probably the closest I'll be able to get to a heron rookery, so I was really excited to get this photo. Mar...

We had to do a quick turn-around when I saw a tree full of nesting Great Blue Herons on an island in the Holston River in Kingsport, TN. This is probably the closest I'll be able to get to a heron rookery, so I was really excited to get this photo. Mar...

We had to do a quick turn-around when I saw a tree full of nesting Great Blue Herons on an island in the Holston River in Kingsport, TN. This is probably the closest I'll be able to get to a heron rookery, so I was really excited to get this photo. Mar. 2, 2008. 1753
61 This <strong>Heron Rookery</strong> is unoccupied for the winter, however when nesting season arrives the huge stick nests will be full of great blue herons and their chicks. They picked a nice, safe place on an island in the middle of the river!

This Heron Rookery is unoccupied for the winter, however when nesting season arrives the huge stick nests will be full of great blue herons and their chicks. They picked a nice, safe place on an island in the middle of the river!

This Heron Rookery is unoccupied for the winter, however when nesting season arrives the huge stick nests will be full of great blue herons and their chicks. They picked a nice, safe place on an island in the middle of the river! 1627
62 I was glad to catch this Great Blue Heron with its beak open. The tongue is visible in the photo.

I was glad to catch this Great Blue Heron with its beak open. The tongue is visible in the photo.

I was glad to catch this Great Blue Heron with its beak open. The tongue is visible in the photo. 1998
63 This Great Blue Heron at Ft. Loudon Lake is so used to being around people that it didn't flinch when I came within about 10 feet of it. The bird had been standing in this spot next to some fishermen for 3 or 4 hours, probably in hopes for a free hando...

This Great Blue Heron at Ft. Loudon Lake is so used to being around people that it didn't flinch when I came within about 10 feet of it. The bird had been standing in this spot next to some fishermen for 3 or 4 hours, probably in hopes for a free hando...

This Great Blue Heron at Ft. Loudon Lake is so used to being around people that it didn't flinch when I came within about 10 feet of it. The bird had been standing in this spot next to some fishermen for 3 or 4 hours, probably in hopes for a free handout! We were at the lake on Memorial Day 2007 and it was very crowded. 1977
64 I was excited to snap this photo of a Great Blue Heron flying overhead. These Herons stand just under 4 feet tall. With a 70" wingspan, these are quite impressive birds!

I was excited to snap this photo of a Great Blue Heron flying overhead. These Herons stand just under 4 feet tall. With a 70" wingspan, these are quite impressive birds!

I was excited to snap this photo of a Great Blue Heron flying overhead. These Herons stand just under 4 feet tall. With a 70" wingspan, these are quite impressive birds! 2378
65 These <strong>Sandhill Cranes</strong> (<em>Grus canadensis</em>) were photographed in a cattle feed lot near the Hiwassee Wildlife Management Area, in Birchwood, TN (Meigs Co.) on Feb. 10, 2007. I <u>finally</u> have a new camera, a Nikon D80! This ph...

These Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis) were photographed in a cattle feed lot near the Hiwassee Wildlife Management Area, in Birchwood, TN (Meigs Co.) on Feb. 10, 2007. I finally have a new camera, a Nikon D80! This ph...

These Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis) were photographed in a cattle feed lot near the Hiwassee Wildlife Management Area, in Birchwood, TN (Meigs Co.) on Feb. 10, 2007. I finally have a new camera, a Nikon D80! This photo was taken with a 70 - 300mm zoom lens. Note the bright red patch on the bird's head on the right. There are 2 sub-species of these Cranes, the Lesser Sandhills (3' - 3.5' tall) and Greater Sandhills (4.5' - 5'). Cranes are grain eaters, but they also eat worms, insects, mice and snakes. One way to remember the difference between a crane and a heron is, "Cranes eat grains, herons eat herrings." Well, they might not really eat herrings, which are marine fish, but it helps to remember that they are fish eaters! 2169
66 I really like the way all three cranes are flying in the same wing pattern in this photo. Cranes often "draft" off the wingtip vortex of the previous bird.

I really like the way all three cranes are flying in the same wing pattern in this photo. Cranes often "draft" off the wingtip vortex of the previous bird.

I really like the way all three cranes are flying in the same wing pattern in this photo. Cranes often "draft" off the wingtip vortex of the previous bird. 1605
67 These two cranes show the shapes that the wings take as they fly.

These two cranes show the shapes that the wings take as they fly.

These two cranes show the shapes that the wings take as they fly. 1655
68 We enjoyed watching these Sandhill cranes landing in the grain field. They look like they are paragliding as they spread their wings and drop slowly to the ground. The comical-looking crane on the upper right is calling as it flies, these are very "voi...

We enjoyed watching these Sandhill cranes landing in the grain field. They look like they are paragliding as they spread their wings and drop slowly to the ground. The comical-looking crane on the upper right is calling as it flies, these are very "voi...

We enjoyed watching these Sandhill cranes landing in the grain field. They look like they are paragliding as they spread their wings and drop slowly to the ground. The comical-looking crane on the upper right is calling as it flies, these are very "voiciferous" birds! 1704
69 Sandhill Cranes
Feb. 10, 2007
Birchwood, TN

Sandhill Cranes Feb. 10, 2007 Birchwood, TN

Sandhill Cranes Feb. 10, 2007 Birchwood, TN 1746
70 Sandhill Cranes in a field of grain

Sandhill Cranes in a field of grain

Sandhill Cranes in a field of grain 1590
71 The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency plants fields of corn and millet grains for the overwintering Sandhill cranes to eat. There are thousands of these huge birds in the area during the winter.

The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency plants fields of corn and millet grains for the overwintering Sandhill cranes to eat. There are thousands of these huge birds in the area during the winter.

The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency plants fields of corn and millet grains for the overwintering Sandhill cranes to eat. There are thousands of these huge birds in the area during the winter. 1587
72 OK, I know I said that Sandhill cranes are not water birds like herons, but they will congregate in the water for protection from predators (such as foxes and dogs). Cranes gather in large flocks, herons don't.

OK, I know I said that Sandhill cranes are not water birds like herons, but they will congregate in the water for protection from predators (such as foxes and dogs). Cranes gather in large flocks, herons don't.

OK, I know I said that Sandhill cranes are not water birds like herons, but they will congregate in the water for protection from predators (such as foxes and dogs). Cranes gather in large flocks, herons don't. 1486
73 During the winter of 2006-7 there were 3 <strong>Whooping Cranes</strong> (<em>Grus americana</em>) among the thousands of Sandhill cranes at the Hiwassee Wildlife Management Area. Whoopers are an endangered species, there are less than 530 wild and ca...

During the winter of 2006-7 there were 3 Whooping Cranes (Grus americana) among the thousands of Sandhill cranes at the Hiwassee Wildlife Management Area. Whoopers are an endangered species, there are less than 530 wild and ca...

During the winter of 2006-7 there were 3 Whooping Cranes (Grus americana) among the thousands of Sandhill cranes at the Hiwassee Wildlife Management Area. Whoopers are an endangered species, there are less than 530 wild and captive birds. It is very easy to tell the difference between the two types of cranes, the Whoopers' have pure white plumage (the flight feathers on the lower wings are black, but only noticable in flight and when the wings are raised) and they have different facial markings. This one caused a great deal of excitement from the viewers on the observation deck when it walked up from the grain field. Note the numerous bands on the Whooper's legs. I wonder if the other birds are jealous of its "jewelry"? :) Unfortunately, the "Focus Fairy" fooled around with my camera at this point and I was unable to get any real good shots at this distance! When we returned 2 weeks later with my new camera (Nikon D80), we didn't see the whooping cranes, so I'm stuck with this lousy photo. ***A sad update*** On Feb. 3, 2007 a devastating tornado struck central Florida. Unfortunately, 20 people lost their lives and the 17 captive whooping cranes at a breeding program were killed when the storm struck their compound. The more individuals lost, the less genetic diversity left in the population. 2028
74 One of the best places to see the cranes is in this cattle feed lot! It is not far from the wildlife refuge. I'm sure the owner of the farm, who lives across the road, is probably glad when the tourists quit parking in front of his house when the birds...

One of the best places to see the cranes is in this cattle feed lot! It is not far from the wildlife refuge. I'm sure the owner of the farm, who lives across the road, is probably glad when the tourists quit parking in front of his house when the birds...

One of the best places to see the cranes is in this cattle feed lot! It is not far from the wildlife refuge. I'm sure the owner of the farm, who lives across the road, is probably glad when the tourists quit parking in front of his house when the birds leave! The cattle don't seem to care! :) 1519
75 I spotted these <strong>Sandhill Cranes</strong> (<em>Grus canadensis</em>) migrating in a "V" when I was teaching an outdoor class at the end of September 2006. Often they can be heard before they are seen, but I didn't hear these. The Sandhill Cranes...

I spotted these Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis) migrating in a "V" when I was teaching an outdoor class at the end of September 2006. Often they can be heard before they are seen, but I didn't hear these. The Sandhill Cranes...

I spotted these Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis) migrating in a "V" when I was teaching an outdoor class at the end of September 2006. Often they can be heard before they are seen, but I didn't hear these. The Sandhill Cranes stop over at the wetlands along the Hiwassee River in southeast Tennessee. These birds fly south in the fall from their homes in the northern states to be able to find food throughout the winter. 1693
76 <strong>Lesser Scaup</strong> - male
<em>Aythya affinis</em>
Boerne, TX
March 28, 2009

At last, I was able to see these pretty ducks up close! The last time I had seen them they were bobbing off in the distance on one of our local lakes. I liked ...

Lesser Scaup - male Aythya affinis Boerne, TX March 28, 2009 At last, I was able to see these pretty ducks up close! The last time I had seen them they were bobbing off in the distance on one of our local lakes. I liked ...

Lesser Scaup - male Aythya affinis Boerne, TX March 28, 2009 At last, I was able to see these pretty ducks up close! The last time I had seen them they were bobbing off in the distance on one of our local lakes. I liked the purple sheen reflecting off the head feathers. 1405
77 <strong>Lesser Scaup</strong> - male and female
<em>Aythya affinis</em>
Boerne, TX
March 28, 2009

Lesser Scaup - male and female Aythya affinis Boerne, TX March 28, 2009

Lesser Scaup - male and female Aythya affinis Boerne, TX March 28, 2009 1521
78 Black Vulture head close-up

Black Vulture head close-up

Black Vulture head close-up 1615
79 Copy of Kestrel male2

Copy of Kestrel male2

Copy of Kestrel male2 1621

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