Butterflies and Caterpillars

Check out this site to see butterflies, moths, and their caterpillars. There is a sequence of the life cycle of the Monarch butterfly on this gallery.
Image Number Image (Click to Enlarge)CaptionImage Viewed
1 I saw this <strong>female Monarch butterfly laying an egg</strong> on a milkweed leaf in my yard; it took only a couple of seconds, then she was fluttering off to another plant. The eggs are usually laid singly on the underside of the leaf to help prot...

I saw this female Monarch butterfly laying an egg on a milkweed leaf in my yard; it took only a couple of seconds, then she was fluttering off to another plant. The eggs are usually laid singly on the underside of the leaf to help prot...

I saw this female Monarch butterfly laying an egg on a milkweed leaf in my yard; it took only a couple of seconds, then she was fluttering off to another plant. The eggs are usually laid singly on the underside of the leaf to help protect them from predators. Butterflies taste through their feet. It is common to see them quickly touching leaves in search of host plants on which to lay their eggs. 1888
2 Well, in nature there are always exceptions to the rule! I photographed this Monarch Butterfly laying her eggs on a milkweed pod instead of under the leaves. It will be interesting to see if the eggs survive. She can't use the excuse of being an inexpe...

Well, in nature there are always exceptions to the rule! I photographed this Monarch Butterfly laying her eggs on a milkweed pod instead of under the leaves. It will be interesting to see if the eggs survive. She can't use the excuse of being an inexpe...

Well, in nature there are always exceptions to the rule! I photographed this Monarch Butterfly laying her eggs on a milkweed pod instead of under the leaves. It will be interesting to see if the eggs survive. She can't use the excuse of being an inexperienced first-time mother, because ALL of the Monarchs only lay one brood of eggs! 1505
3 The life of a butterfly begins as an <strong>egg</strong>, such as this one from a Monarch. It is hard to believe a caterpillar could emerge from such a small egg, it is only about 1 millimeter tall. Note the tiny lines radiating from the top of the eg...

The life of a butterfly begins as an egg, such as this one from a Monarch. It is hard to believe a caterpillar could emerge from such a small egg, it is only about 1 millimeter tall. Note the tiny lines radiating from the top of the eg...

The life of a butterfly begins as an egg, such as this one from a Monarch. It is hard to believe a caterpillar could emerge from such a small egg, it is only about 1 millimeter tall. Note the tiny lines radiating from the top of the egg. The mother monarch lays her eggs on only milkweed leaves (which she identifies by tasting them with her feet!), usually on the underneath side. A butterfly can lay over 500 eggs. 2094
4 This tiny <strong>Monarch caterpillar hatchling</strong> is probably about 1 day old and only about 2mm long. When it hatched, the first meal it ate was its egg shell. Next it ate the tiny hairs on the back of the leaf. This little caterpillar has alre...

This tiny Monarch caterpillar hatchling is probably about 1 day old and only about 2mm long. When it hatched, the first meal it ate was its egg shell. Next it ate the tiny hairs on the back of the leaf. This little caterpillar has alre...

This tiny Monarch caterpillar hatchling is probably about 1 day old and only about 2mm long. When it hatched, the first meal it ate was its egg shell. Next it ate the tiny hairs on the back of the leaf. This little caterpillar has already eaten a small hole in the leaf. Within the next 2 weeks, it will eat many leaves. The tiny black bumps on the top near the head and back end will grow into the "whiplashes" (antennae). In 2 weeks this little caterpillar will molt its' skin 4 times (the period between moltings are called "instars") and eat and poop a lot! Monarch caterpillars gain 3000 times their hatching weight by the time they are ready to become a chrysalis. I tell my students if they grew at the same rate as these caterpillars, by the time they became teenagers they would be as big as a school bus and weigh as much as 2 female elephants! 2025
5 <strong>Monarch caterpillar</strong><br>
This beautiful Monarch larva is munching on Common Milkweed, its only food. Milkweeds contain a cardiac glycoside in the leaves which the caterpillar stores in its body. The bright coloration is a warning to bi...

Monarch caterpillar
This beautiful Monarch larva is munching on Common Milkweed, its only food. Milkweeds contain a cardiac glycoside in the leaves which the caterpillar stores in its body. The bright coloration is a warning to bi...

Monarch caterpillar
This beautiful Monarch larva is munching on Common Milkweed, its only food. Milkweeds contain a cardiac glycoside in the leaves which the caterpillar stores in its body. The bright coloration is a warning to birds not to eat it. This picture was taken in late August, the butterfly that this caterpillar will become will migrate to Mexico and overwinter there. Most butterflies live only about a month. Monarchs that migrate delay their sexual maturity for several months. After mating in February and laying eggs in Texas, they will die. Reproduction is the "kiss of death" for these insects! A lot of children want to know if a caterpillar is a male or female, I tell them it isn't possible to tell the gender until it becomes a butterfly.
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6 <strong>Monarch caterpillar</strong><br>
Note the tiny spiked feet near the head, these are the true legs of the caterpillar, the black and white ones are called "prolegs".  The two antennae are called "whiplashes". The ones near the head are longer t...

Monarch caterpillar
Note the tiny spiked feet near the head, these are the true legs of the caterpillar, the black and white ones are called "prolegs". The two antennae are called "whiplashes". The ones near the head are longer t...

Monarch caterpillar
Note the tiny spiked feet near the head, these are the true legs of the caterpillar, the black and white ones are called "prolegs". The two antennae are called "whiplashes". The ones near the head are longer than the ones at the end of the abdomen.
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7 Monarch Caterpillar and frass ("poop") on leaf below. This was one of my first photos to take with my new "emergency purse and pocket camera", a tiny 6 megapixel Nikon L11 point and shoot. I was very excited to find this caterpillar in the garden outsi...

Monarch Caterpillar and frass ("poop") on leaf below. This was one of my first photos to take with my new "emergency purse and pocket camera", a tiny 6 megapixel Nikon L11 point and shoot. I was very excited to find this caterpillar in the garden outsi...

Monarch Caterpillar and frass ("poop") on leaf below. This was one of my first photos to take with my new "emergency purse and pocket camera", a tiny 6 megapixel Nikon L11 point and shoot. I was very excited to find this caterpillar in the garden outside my room at school, I shared it with the children in the first grade class across the hall. The frass was what caught my attention to the caterpillar from my room! The teachers were laughing during lunch that only I could get excited about seeing caterpillar poop! :) 1145
8 This is one of the first signs that may indicate the presence of a Monarch caterpillar; as they eat more and get larger, they produce large amounts of frass (a.k.a. "poop"). The caterpillar was on the leaf just above this one, the frass collected below...

This is one of the first signs that may indicate the presence of a Monarch caterpillar; as they eat more and get larger, they produce large amounts of frass (a.k.a. "poop"). The caterpillar was on the leaf just above this one, the frass collected below...

This is one of the first signs that may indicate the presence of a Monarch caterpillar; as they eat more and get larger, they produce large amounts of frass (a.k.a. "poop"). The caterpillar was on the leaf just above this one, the frass collected below it. There is a small amount of a chewed leaf that fell too. 1427
9 <strong>Monarch caterpillar hanging in a "J"</strong><br>
I found this caterpillar in the garden at my school with my students in late September. About 12 hours before the caterpillar becomes a pupa or chrysalis, it spins a web of silk on a branch, le...

Monarch caterpillar hanging in a "J"
I found this caterpillar in the garden at my school with my students in late September. About 12 hours before the caterpillar becomes a pupa or chrysalis, it spins a web of silk on a branch, le...

Monarch caterpillar hanging in a "J"
I found this caterpillar in the garden at my school with my students in late September. About 12 hours before the caterpillar becomes a pupa or chrysalis, it spins a web of silk on a branch, leaf, fence post, or other hard surface. It attaches its back prolegs to the silk mat and hangs head down (note the tiny black hooks on the prolegs, they are called crochets; the 6 true legs are on the thorax near the head). Then for several hours the caterpillar pulls air into its' body through the tiny breathing holes in the abdomen, called spiracles. The skin begins to loosen and the white stripes begin to take on a light green cast. Just before the big transformation takes place, the whiplashes ("antennae") begin to shrivel and the caterpillar straightens out. Suddenly, the skin begins to split just behind the head and the caterpillar wriggles violently to loosen the skin. The skin then slides up to where the caterpillar is attached by the black stalk called a cremaster. After a minute or two of hard wriggling the skin pops off and a light green chrysalis hangs where a caterpillar had been! (See next picture)
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10 Two Monarch chrysalises<br>
The caterpillar's body becomes a "soupy" mix of cells while it is in the chrysalis. During the 10 - 14 days that it is pupating, the caterpillar goes through a marvelous transformation. As the cells rearrange, wings slowly ...

Two Monarch chrysalises
The caterpillar's body becomes a "soupy" mix of cells while it is in the chrysalis. During the 10 - 14 days that it is pupating, the caterpillar goes through a marvelous transformation. As the cells rearrange, wings slowly ...

Two Monarch chrysalises
The caterpillar's body becomes a "soupy" mix of cells while it is in the chrysalis. During the 10 - 14 days that it is pupating, the caterpillar goes through a marvelous transformation. As the cells rearrange, wings slowly begin to show through the transparent shell of the chrysalis, a different kind of mouth is forming and the butterfly will soon develop scales and begin to turn black. The last 24 hours are the most amazing to watch as the chrysalis quickly turns from green to black and orange. Note the black line and the small gold dots on the green chrysalis. Some scientists believe they may help function in camouflage. The butterfly in the black chrysalis emerged a couple of hours after this photo was taken. The green one emerged a few days later.
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11 <strong>A Parasitized Chrysalis</strong>
I was sorry to see this sight, a kindergarten class had enjoyed watching the caterpillar turn into this chrysalis just 2 days earlier. The dark hole on the side was made by a tachnid fly larva. While the caterp...

A Parasitized Chrysalis I was sorry to see this sight, a kindergarten class had enjoyed watching the caterpillar turn into this chrysalis just 2 days earlier. The dark hole on the side was made by a tachnid fly larva. While the caterp...

A Parasitized Chrysalis I was sorry to see this sight, a kindergarten class had enjoyed watching the caterpillar turn into this chrysalis just 2 days earlier. The dark hole on the side was made by a tachnid fly larva. While the caterpillar was still small, a female fly had laid an egg on it. The emerging maggot buried into the caterpillar and ate it alive. It is not possible to tell if a caterpillar has been parasitized until it becomes a chrysalis because it eats and grows as though it is unaffected. However, a couple of days after the caterpillar pupates, the maggot crawls through the chrysalis, falls to the ground and becomes a pupa itself. If this happens in a captive chrysalis, you will see a small brown oval-shaped pupa on the bottom of the cage. In August and September 2006 nearly every classroom at my school had a caterpillar because we have a very convenient supply of milkweed in the Secret Garden just outside my door. I explained to the teachers that upsetting as it may be to the students if this happens, this is a part of nature. All creatures must eat, it just happens that the tachnid fly larvae eat caterpillars (and other insects). 1729
12 It is easy to see the wings of the butterfly through this transparent Monarch chrysalis. It is hard to believe there is an entire butterfly packed tightly into this inch-long chrysalis.

It is easy to see the wings of the butterfly through this transparent Monarch chrysalis. It is hard to believe there is an entire butterfly packed tightly into this inch-long chrysalis.

It is easy to see the wings of the butterfly through this transparent Monarch chrysalis. It is hard to believe there is an entire butterfly packed tightly into this inch-long chrysalis. 1382
13 The butterfly loosens from the chrysalis and then, with no warning, the chrysalis splits open and the butterfly begins to emerge head first. 
I waited 45 minutes to catch this stage of metamorphosis in action.

The butterfly loosens from the chrysalis and then, with no warning, the chrysalis splits open and the butterfly begins to emerge head first. I waited 45 minutes to catch this stage of metamorphosis in action.

The butterfly loosens from the chrysalis and then, with no warning, the chrysalis splits open and the butterfly begins to emerge head first. I waited 45 minutes to catch this stage of metamorphosis in action. 1052
14 The Monarch emerges quickly from the chrysalis, it takes only a few minutes to be free.

The Monarch emerges quickly from the chrysalis, it takes only a few minutes to be free.

The Monarch emerges quickly from the chrysalis, it takes only a few minutes to be free. 997
15 Notice how the butterfly hangs onto the empty chrysalis. The huge abdomen flips down and the butterfly crawls around so its head points up. The wings are still damp and wrinkled. The <em>probosis</em> (tube-like mouth) is in two parts when the butterfl...

Notice how the butterfly hangs onto the empty chrysalis. The huge abdomen flips down and the butterfly crawls around so its head points up. The wings are still damp and wrinkled. The probosis (tube-like mouth) is in two parts when the butterfl...

Notice how the butterfly hangs onto the empty chrysalis. The huge abdomen flips down and the butterfly crawls around so its head points up. The wings are still damp and wrinkled. The probosis (tube-like mouth) is in two parts when the butterfly first emerges. The butterfly will drip a few drops of red liquid upon emerging; it is not blood, it is called meconium and is the leftover fluid and tissues from the metamorphosis. I tell my students if they hadn't gone to the bathroom for 2 weeks, they'd have to go pretty badly too! 1050
16 Ken and I had to take this <strong>Monarch butterfly</strong> (<em>Danaus plexippus</em>) with us to Florida on a "hurricane Ivan clean-up trip" (Oct. 2004) as a chrysalis because I knew it would emerge before I got back home. It came out of the chrysa...

Ken and I had to take this Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) with us to Florida on a "hurricane Ivan clean-up trip" (Oct. 2004) as a chrysalis because I knew it would emerge before I got back home. It came out of the chrysa...

Ken and I had to take this Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) with us to Florida on a "hurricane Ivan clean-up trip" (Oct. 2004) as a chrysalis because I knew it would emerge before I got back home. It came out of the chrysalis in the container when we got to northern Alabama. We stopped at a rest stop near Gadsen and I released it on some goldenrod flowers. She was lucky, she got a 200-mile head start on her siblings in Oak Ridge! This beautiful little lady will fly to Mexico over the next few months to overwinter in the pine trees in the mountains outside Mexico City. If she makes the journey and survives the winter, in late February she will mate and begin the flight back north. She will lay her eggs in northern Mexico or southern Texas in March. After laying her eggs she will die. Her offspring will then fly on to places farther north about a month later, such as Oak Ridge, and in late April my students will enjoy watching their caterpillars go through their lifecycle! :) 1733
17 A group of kindergarteners from my school anxiously await the release of this Monarch butterfly in the Secret Garden. They had raised the butterfly from an egg and followed the lifecycle in their classroom.

A group of kindergarteners from my school anxiously await the release of this Monarch butterfly in the Secret Garden. They had raised the butterfly from an egg and followed the lifecycle in their classroom.

A group of kindergarteners from my school anxiously await the release of this Monarch butterfly in the Secret Garden. They had raised the butterfly from an egg and followed the lifecycle in their classroom. 1098
18 I had just tagged this Monarch butterfly before releasing it with a first grade class at my school. If the butterfly was later found by researchers in Mexico, the tag would identify where it came from.

I had just tagged this Monarch butterfly before releasing it with a first grade class at my school. If the butterfly was later found by researchers in Mexico, the tag would identify where it came from.

I had just tagged this Monarch butterfly before releasing it with a first grade class at my school. If the butterfly was later found by researchers in Mexico, the tag would identify where it came from. 850
19 The tag on this Monarch's wing weighs very little, it doesn't interfere with the butterfly's flight. Anyone finding a butterfly with a tag should contact the researchers at the address to aid in migration information.

The tag on this Monarch's wing weighs very little, it doesn't interfere with the butterfly's flight. Anyone finding a butterfly with a tag should contact the researchers at the address to aid in migration information.

The tag on this Monarch's wing weighs very little, it doesn't interfere with the butterfly's flight. Anyone finding a butterfly with a tag should contact the researchers at the address to aid in migration information. 965
20 This female Monarch butterfly had just been released in the "Secret Garden" by a group of students at my school. The females do not have the dots (pheremone cells) on the lower wings that the males have.

This female Monarch butterfly had just been released in the "Secret Garden" by a group of students at my school. The females do not have the dots (pheremone cells) on the lower wings that the males have.

This female Monarch butterfly had just been released in the "Secret Garden" by a group of students at my school. The females do not have the dots (pheremone cells) on the lower wings that the males have. 1225
21 <strong>Male Monarch Butterfly</strong><br><em>Danaus plexippus</em> / Milkweed Butterfly Family <br>September 2006

Male Monarch Butterfly
Danaus plexippus / Milkweed Butterfly Family
September 2006

Male Monarch Butterfly
Danaus plexippus / Milkweed Butterfly Family
September 2006 It is easy to determine the gender of a Monarch butterfly, just wait for it to open its wings and then look for the black dot on the vein of the lower wings. This spot is where the male's pheremone is released.
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22 <strong>Monarch butterfly wing at 30x </strong>

Monarch butterfly wing at 30x

Monarch butterfly wing at 30x 1000
23 <strong>Monarch butterfly wing at 10x</strong>
This photo was taken of the wings of a dead butterfly. The wings were closed, the lower half of this photo shows the scales on the outside of the wing and the upper half the brighter scales of the inside ...

Monarch butterfly wing at 10x This photo was taken of the wings of a dead butterfly. The wings were closed, the lower half of this photo shows the scales on the outside of the wing and the upper half the brighter scales of the inside ...

Monarch butterfly wing at 10x This photo was taken of the wings of a dead butterfly. The wings were closed, the lower half of this photo shows the scales on the outside of the wing and the upper half the brighter scales of the inside wing. 1060
24 <strong>Monarch butterfly forelegs magnified at 10x</strong>
Monarch butterflies appear to have only 4 legs, but they really do have 6. This photo, taken with my new digital stereomicroscope, shows the tiny, vestigial forelegs.

Monarch butterfly forelegs magnified at 10x Monarch butterflies appear to have only 4 legs, but they really do have 6. This photo, taken with my new digital stereomicroscope, shows the tiny, vestigial forelegs.

Monarch butterfly forelegs magnified at 10x Monarch butterflies appear to have only 4 legs, but they really do have 6. This photo, taken with my new digital stereomicroscope, shows the tiny, vestigial forelegs. 1035
25 Butterfly wing scales magnified at 60X.

Butterfly wing scales magnified at 60X.

Butterfly wing scales magnified at 60X. 794
26 This butterfly wing was magnified 10 times with an Intel Play digital microscope. The microscope takes low megapixel photos, so the picture quality is not quite up to par. 
The scales on the wings serve different purposes, they work as "solar collecto...

This butterfly wing was magnified 10 times with an Intel Play digital microscope. The microscope takes low megapixel photos, so the picture quality is not quite up to par. The scales on the wings serve different purposes, they work as "solar collecto...

This butterfly wing was magnified 10 times with an Intel Play digital microscope. The microscope takes low megapixel photos, so the picture quality is not quite up to par. The scales on the wings serve different purposes, they work as "solar collectors" to help warm the butterfly for flight; they give coloration to the butterfly; they help attract a mate. It is a misconception that butterflies can not fly if their wings are touched and the scales come off. The biggest danger is if the wings are damaged from being caught by awkward little hands, then the butterfly can no longer fly. It is best to use an insect net and a wide-mouthed jar for catching butterflies; don't keep them in the jar for long, they may flap around too much and break their wings. 1025
27 Butterfly scales magnified at 200X. I wish the little microscope would take higher quality photos, this would be so cool if the lines could be seen on the scales. There is a lot of "noise" (little dots of light) in this photo. Maybe someday I'll have a...

Butterfly scales magnified at 200X. I wish the little microscope would take higher quality photos, this would be so cool if the lines could be seen on the scales. There is a lot of "noise" (little dots of light) in this photo. Maybe someday I'll have a...

Butterfly scales magnified at 200X. I wish the little microscope would take higher quality photos, this would be so cool if the lines could be seen on the scales. There is a lot of "noise" (little dots of light) in this photo. Maybe someday I'll have access to a really good digital microscope! Anybody got a spare $1500+? ;) 815
28 <strong>Viceroy Butterfly</strong><br><em>Limenitis archippus</em><br>Oak Ridge, TN<br>Oct. 4, 2007<br>***An Anderson county record butterfly!***

Viceroy Butterfly
Limenitis archippus
Oak Ridge, TN
Oct. 4, 2007
***An Anderson county record butterfly!***

Viceroy Butterfly
Limenitis archippus
Oak Ridge, TN
Oct. 4, 2007
***An Anderson county record butterfly!*** I really wanted to have a photo of this butterfly because it mimics the color and vein pattern of the Monarch. The Viceroy is a bit smaller and has a horizontal stripe across the back wings that the Monarch doesn't have. It is tricky to tell the difference between the two at first glance. This type of mimicry is called "Mullerian mimicry", both of the butterflies are toxic, birds know to avoid them due to their coloration. Host plants for caterpillars include: Aspens, poplars, Willows, Plums, Cherries, and Apples. Formerly known as: Basilarchia archippus
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29 <strong>Viceroy Butterfly</strong> - closed wings
<em>Limenitis archippus</em> - wings closed
Oak Ridge, TN
Oct. 4, 2007

Viceroy Butterfly - closed wings Limenitis archippus - wings closed Oak Ridge, TN Oct. 4, 2007

Viceroy Butterfly - closed wings Limenitis archippus - wings closed Oak Ridge, TN Oct. 4, 2007 993
30 <strong>Viceroy Caterpillar</strong>

Viceroy Caterpillar

Viceroy Caterpillar 1145
31 This is a close-up of the mouth of a Question Mark Butterfly. Note how the proboscis is in 2 parts. Butterflies and moths have hollow, coiled mouth parts used like a straw to sip liquids. This butterfly was on a picnic table at science camp.

This is a close-up of the mouth of a Question Mark Butterfly. Note how the proboscis is in 2 parts. Butterflies and moths have hollow, coiled mouth parts used like a straw to sip liquids. This butterfly was on a picnic table at science camp.

This is a close-up of the mouth of a Question Mark Butterfly. Note how the proboscis is in 2 parts. Butterflies and moths have hollow, coiled mouth parts used like a straw to sip liquids. This butterfly was on a picnic table at science camp. 1549
32 <strong>Mourning Cloak Butterfly</strong><br><em>Nymphalis antiopa antiopa</em><br>Great Smoky Mountains NP<br>March 18, 2009<br>***A Cocke County, TN record butterfly!***

Mourning Cloak Butterfly
Nymphalis antiopa antiopa
Great Smoky Mountains NP
March 18, 2009
***A Cocke County, TN record butterfly!***

Mourning Cloak Butterfly
Nymphalis antiopa antiopa
Great Smoky Mountains NP
March 18, 2009
***A Cocke County, TN record butterfly!*** I have long wanted to photograph this elusive butterfly. I spotted it while hiking on the Porter's Creek trail in the Smokies. They are very "flitty" butterflies and they don't stay in one spot long when they land. I was amazed at how well-camouflaged this one was when it landed in the leaves. I glanced down to check on my camera settings for just a second and I couldn't find it again! I had to wait until it flew and landed again, then I snapped pictures as quickly as possible because I knew it wouldn't stay there long. These are one of the first large butterflies to emerge in the spring, so you have to get out early to see them.
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33 <strong>Red Admiral</strong> <br><em>Vanessa atalanta</em>

Red Admiral
Vanessa atalanta

Red Admiral
Vanessa atalanta I photographed this butterfly at Frozen Head State Park. It looks much different with open wings than it does with them closed (see following photo). The species name sound like an Italian's pronunciation of Georgia's largest city! :) Host plants for caterpillar include: Nettles, false nettles, hops.
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34 Red Admiral butterfly with wings closed

Red Admiral butterfly with wings closed

Red Admiral butterfly with wings closed 1073
35 <strong>American Lady Butterfly</strong> with closed wings
<em>Vanessa virginiensis</em>
Oak Ridge, TN
May 26, 2007

Note the "eyespots" on the lower wing, these are supposed to frighten away predators. I wish that stray piece of grass had not bee...

American Lady Butterfly with closed wings Vanessa virginiensis Oak Ridge, TN May 26, 2007 Note the "eyespots" on the lower wing, these are supposed to frighten away predators. I wish that stray piece of grass had not bee...

American Lady Butterfly with closed wings Vanessa virginiensis Oak Ridge, TN May 26, 2007 Note the "eyespots" on the lower wing, these are supposed to frighten away predators. I wish that stray piece of grass had not been in the way! Also, note how the butterfly uses the long proboscis to drink nectar from the clover flower. Host plants for caterpillars include: Thistle, other composites and mallows. 1272
36 <strong>American Lady Butterfly</strong> <br><em>Vanessa virginiensis</em>)<br>

American Lady Butterfly
Vanessa virginiensis)

American Lady Butterfly
Vanessa virginiensis)
This shot is of the butterfly with open wings. I'm not crazy about this photo, maybe I'll see another of these butterflies and I can get a better one! Butterflies are not the easiest insects to photograph!
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37 A <strong>Painted Lady</strong> caterpillar
<em>Vanessa cardui</em><br>
I found this caterpillar in early March 2005 while searching for wildflowers at Haw Ridge. It eats nettle leaves.

A Painted Lady caterpillar Vanessa cardui
I found this caterpillar in early March 2005 while searching for wildflowers at Haw Ridge. It eats nettle leaves.

A Painted Lady caterpillar Vanessa cardui
I found this caterpillar in early March 2005 while searching for wildflowers at Haw Ridge. It eats nettle leaves.
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38 <strong>Tawny Emperor Butterfly</strong><br><em>Asterocampa clyton</em><br>June 13, 2007<br>***An Anderson County, TN record butterfly!***

Tawny Emperor Butterfly
Asterocampa clyton
June 13, 2007
***An Anderson County, TN record butterfly!***

Tawny Emperor Butterfly
Asterocampa clyton
June 13, 2007
***An Anderson County, TN record butterfly!*** This pretty butterfly was fluttering around the Freels Bend Cabin during our science camp. It may have recently emerged from its chrysalis on the nearby Hackberry tree which is its host plant. Side view with closed wings follows.
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39 <strong>Tawny Emperor Butterfly</strong> wings closed<br><em>Asterocampa clyton</em> <br> June 13, 2007

Tawny Emperor Butterfly wings closed
Asterocampa clyton
June 13, 2007

Tawny Emperor Butterfly wings closed
Asterocampa clyton
June 13, 2007 The butterfly found a drop of juice that a camper had spilled, it enjoyed the sweet liquid.
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40 <strong>Gulf Fritillary</strong><br><em>Agraulis vanillae</em><br>Oak Ridge, TNSept. 26, 2007

Gulf Fritillary
Agraulis vanillae
Oak Ridge, TNSept. 26, 2007

Gulf Fritillary
Agraulis vanillae
Oak Ridge, TNSept. 26, 2007 This pretty butterfly was visiting the flowers in the garden outside my room at school. In the fall the Passionflower vines are covered in the caterpillars of these butterflies.
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41 <strong>Gulf Fritillary</strong><br><em>Agraulis vanillae</em><br>Milton, FL<br>Sept. 1, 2007

Gulf Fritillary
Agraulis vanillae
Milton, FL
Sept. 1, 2007

Gulf Fritillary
Agraulis vanillae
Milton, FL
Sept. 1, 2007 This Gulf Fritillary Butterfly is laying her egg on a tendril of a Passionflower vine. The caterpillar will probably have a better chance for survival than those laid on leaves (such as the blurry one on the leaf in the background). The Passionflower vine has extrafloral nectaries that attract ants, the ants will also eat any insect eggs they encounter. The butterflies have learned to thwart this strategy by laying most of their eggs on the tendrils, far away from the nectaries! By the time the caterpillars are big enough to start eating the leaves, they are too big to be bothered by the ants. How cool is that?!
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42 An Ant drinking from a Passion Flower bud nectar. Believe me, this was not an easy shot!

An Ant drinking from a Passion Flower bud nectar. Believe me, this was not an easy shot!

An Ant drinking from a Passion Flower bud nectar. Believe me, this was not an easy shot! 817
43 I got this photo of a <b>Gulf Fritillary egg</b> right after the butterfly laid it on the tendril of a Passionflower vine. Note the detail of the pattern in the shell.

I got this photo of a Gulf Fritillary egg right after the butterfly laid it on the tendril of a Passionflower vine. Note the detail of the pattern in the shell.

I got this photo of a Gulf Fritillary egg right after the butterfly laid it on the tendril of a Passionflower vine. Note the detail of the pattern in the shell. 593
44 <b>Gulf Fritilary Caterpillar</b>

Gulf Fritilary Caterpillar

Gulf Fritilary Caterpillar I spotted this Gulf Fritilary Caterpillar just moments after it had shed its skin. Notice how the spikes are yellow, they have not yet turned black. The caterpillar will eat its discarded skin later. I know it sounds gross, but the skin contains needed protein. 719
45 This Caterpillar is eating its shed skin!

This Caterpillar is eating its shed skin!

This Caterpillar is eating its shed skin! 739
46 This <strong>Gulf Fritillary caterpillar</strong> (<em>Agraulis vanillae</em>) is munching a passionflower leaf, its' only food source. The scary-looking black spines are soft and not dangerous. Some caterpillars have sharp spines and can sting. It is ...

This Gulf Fritillary caterpillar (Agraulis vanillae) is munching a passionflower leaf, its' only food source. The scary-looking black spines are soft and not dangerous. Some caterpillars have sharp spines and can sting. It is ...

This Gulf Fritillary caterpillar (Agraulis vanillae) is munching a passionflower leaf, its' only food source. The scary-looking black spines are soft and not dangerous. Some caterpillars have sharp spines and can sting. It is fascinating how plants and insects battle one another with "one-up-manship". The Passionflower has small extrafloral nectaries (nectar producing bumps) on the leaf axils (bases) which attract ants. The plant "wants" to attract the ants because they eat the eggs and small caterpillars. The butterflies try to outsmart the plants by laying their eggs at the tips of the tendrils, far from the ants. Pretty cool, huh?! I just love nature! :) 2166
47 <strong>Gulf Fritillary</strong> caterpillar' shedding its skin

Gulf Fritillary caterpillar' shedding its skin

Gulf Fritillary caterpillar' shedding its skin This Gulf Fritillary caterpillar's skin has begun to split; in a few hours it will become a chrysalis. It is hanging on the outside of the back door of my classroom. The caterpillar had eaten the Passionflower leaves in the school's "Secret Garden." 1624
48 This Gulf Fritillary chrysalis was one of four that I found on the building just outside my room at school. The butterfly will  emerge in about 2 weeks. The chrysalis is well camouflaged. 

***They must not have been as well camouflaged as I thought,...

This Gulf Fritillary chrysalis was one of four that I found on the building just outside my room at school. The butterfly will emerge in about 2 weeks. The chrysalis is well camouflaged. ***They must not have been as well camouflaged as I thought,...

This Gulf Fritillary chrysalis was one of four that I found on the building just outside my room at school. The butterfly will emerge in about 2 weeks. The chrysalis is well camouflaged. ***They must not have been as well camouflaged as I thought, the day after I took this picture the 4 chrysalises were gone! My guess is that a bird must have found them and chowed down! 1222
49 <strong>Great Spangled Fritillary</strong>  (male)<br><em>Speyeria cybele</em>

Great Spangled Fritillary (male)
Speyeria cybele

Great Spangled Fritillary (male)
Speyeria cybele This beautiful butterfly was found in the cedar barrens area in Oak Ridge. Host plant for caterpillars: Violets
1716
50 Great Spangled Fritillary Butterfly with wings closed

Great Spangled Fritillary Butterfly with wings closed

Great Spangled Fritillary Butterfly with wings closed 876
51 No, this is not a cross-eyed Conehead alien creature! It is a close-up look at a <strong>Fritillary Butterfly</strong> seen looking down on it as it hung on a plant. The "cone" on the head is the closed wings.

No, this is not a cross-eyed Conehead alien creature! It is a close-up look at a Fritillary Butterfly seen looking down on it as it hung on a plant. The "cone" on the head is the closed wings.

No, this is not a cross-eyed Conehead alien creature! It is a close-up look at a Fritillary Butterfly seen looking down on it as it hung on a plant. The "cone" on the head is the closed wings. 944
52 <strong>Silver-spotted Skipper</strong><br> <em>Epargyreus clarus</em> / True Skipper Family

Silver-spotted Skipper
Epargyreus clarus / True Skipper Family

Silver-spotted Skipper
Epargyreus clarus / True Skipper Family Notice the long proboscis ("tongue") of this skipper as it drinks nectar from the individual flowers of the Ironweed. Skippers have bent ends on their antennae, butterflies have knobbed antennae. Once during one of my insect programs my students found skippers and small flies called "midges," as I named them to the kids one of the mothers laughed and asked, "Do you have Barbies too?" :) Host plants for caterpillars: Sennas
862
53 <strong>Little Glassywing Skipper</strong><br><em>Pompeius verna</em><br>Great Smoky Mountains NP<br>Sept. 16, 2007

Little Glassywing Skipper
Pompeius verna
Great Smoky Mountains NP
Sept. 16, 2007

Little Glassywing Skipper
Pompeius verna
Great Smoky Mountains NP
Sept. 16, 2007 Host plants for caterpillars: Desert bunchgrass
1284
54 <strong>Wild Indigo Duskywing</strong><br><em>Erynnis baptisiae</em><br>Great Smoky Mountains NP<br>Sept. 16, 2007<br>***Record Butterfly for Sevier County, TN***

Wild Indigo Duskywing
Erynnis baptisiae
Great Smoky Mountains NP
Sept. 16, 2007
***Record Butterfly for Sevier County, TN***

Wild Indigo Duskywing
Erynnis baptisiae
Great Smoky Mountains NP
Sept. 16, 2007
***Record Butterfly for Sevier County, TN*** Host plants for caterpillars: Wild indigo and Crown Vetch
1272
55 <strong>Sachem Skipper</strong><br><em>Atalopedes campestris</em>

Sachem Skipper
Atalopedes campestris

Sachem Skipper
Atalopedes campestris I photographed this skipper on a butterfly bush at Willow Brook School.
971
56 <strong>Spring Azure Butterfly</strong><br><em>Celastrina neglecta</em><br>Spring City, TN<br>May 30, 2008

Spring Azure Butterfly
Celastrina neglecta
Spring City, TN
May 30, 2008

Spring Azure Butterfly
Celastrina neglecta
Spring City, TN
May 30, 2008 These little blue butterflies look similar to the Tailed Blues and Hairstreaks, but they don't have the orange false eyespots on the hind wings. These butterflies are commonly seen puddling in large numbers. The host plants for the caterpillars of these butterflies include: Black Snakeroot, Dogwood (which this one is on), Blueberries, Meadowsweet, and Viburnum.
1145
57 <strong>Eastern Tailed Blue Butterfly</strong> <br><em>Everes comyntas comyntas</em><br>Great Smoky Mountains NP <br>Sept. 16, 2007

Eastern Tailed Blue Butterfly
Everes comyntas comyntas
Great Smoky Mountains NP
Sept. 16, 2007

Eastern Tailed Blue Butterfly
Everes comyntas comyntas
Great Smoky Mountains NP
Sept. 16, 2007 This is a very common little blue butterfly in Tennessee. (Sorry about the badly placed shadow!) Host plants for caterpillars: Clovers, Bush Clover, Wild Pea, beans, and Tick Trefoil
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58 <strong>Eastern Tailed Blue Butterfly</strong> <br><em>Everes comyntas</em><br>Great Smoky Mountains NP <br>Sept. 16, 2007

Eastern Tailed Blue Butterfly
Everes comyntas
Great Smoky Mountains NP
Sept. 16, 2007

Eastern Tailed Blue Butterfly
Everes comyntas
Great Smoky Mountains NP
Sept. 16, 2007 These are very common butterflies in east TN. The tiny "tails" are used for confusing predators.
1140
59 <strong>Red-banded Hairstreak Butterfly</strong><br><em>Calycopis cecrops</em><br>Oak Ridge, TN<br>Sept. 28, 2007

Red-banded Hairstreak Butterfly
Calycopis cecrops
Oak Ridge, TN
Sept. 28, 2007

Red-banded Hairstreak Butterfly
Calycopis cecrops
Oak Ridge, TN
Sept. 28, 2007 This is an easy butterfly to identify because of the bright red markings on the outsides of the wings.
1159
60 <strong>Red-spotted Purple Butterfly; Red-spotted Admiral</strong><br> <em>Limenitis arthemis astyanax</em>

Red-spotted Purple Butterfly; Red-spotted Admiral
Limenitis arthemis astyanax

Red-spotted Purple Butterfly; Red-spotted Admiral
Limenitis arthemis astyanax There are no red spots on the upper side of the wings and the butterfly has no purple on it. This is a common butterfly in Tennessee.
3090
61 <strong>Red-spotted Purple Butterfly; Red-spotted Admiral</strong> side view
<em>Limenitis arthemis astyanax</em>

Red-spotted Purple Butterfly; Red-spotted Admiral side view Limenitis arthemis astyanax

Red-spotted Purple Butterfly; Red-spotted Admiral side view Limenitis arthemis astyanax 1360
62 <strong>Giant Swallowtail</strong><br><em>Papilio cresphontes</em><br> Milton, FL<br> August 6, 2008

Giant Swallowtail
Papilio cresphontes
Milton, FL
August 6, 2008

Giant Swallowtail
Papilio cresphontes
Milton, FL
August 6, 2008 I spotted this Swallowtail butterfly laying her eggs on a lemon tree in my parents' neighborhood in Florida. I was surprised she deposited them on top of the leaf instead of underneath where they are better protected. See egg in next photo.
669
63 Giant Swallowtail egg

Giant Swallowtail egg

Giant Swallowtail egg 650
64 <strong>Tiger Swallowtail butterfly</strong> <br> <em>Pterourus glaucus glaucus</em>

Tiger Swallowtail butterfly
Pterourus glaucus glaucus

Tiger Swallowtail butterfly
Pterourus glaucus glaucus I photographed this male Tiger Swallowtail butterfly on a Coneflower in one of the butterfly gardens at Frozen Head State Park. He is drinking nectar from one of the disk flowers. This is the "logo" photo for my Buds and Bugs Photos.
1551
65 A <strong>Light phase Female Tiger Swallowtail</strong> on Coneflower.
Dark phase females are mostly black.

A Light phase Female Tiger Swallowtail on Coneflower. Dark phase females are mostly black.

A Light phase Female Tiger Swallowtail on Coneflower. Dark phase females are mostly black. 1184
66 These <strong>Tiger Swallowtail</strong> (<em>Pterourus glaucus</em>) and the <strong>Pipevine Swallowtail</strong> butterflies were seen "puddling" at a parking area in the Smokies. Large groups of male butterflies congregate at spots where animals (h...

These Tiger Swallowtail (Pterourus glaucus) and the Pipevine Swallowtail butterflies were seen "puddling" at a parking area in the Smokies. Large groups of male butterflies congregate at spots where animals (h...

These Tiger Swallowtail (Pterourus glaucus) and the Pipevine Swallowtail butterflies were seen "puddling" at a parking area in the Smokies. Large groups of male butterflies congregate at spots where animals (horses, in this case) have defecated or urinated. The male butterflies obtain salts and other minerals from droppings and urine, they pass them on to the females during mating. 1282
67 <strong>Spicebush Swallowtail</strong> <br><em>Pterourus troilus</em><br>May 27, 2007

Spicebush Swallowtail
Pterourus troilus
May 27, 2007

Spicebush Swallowtail
Pterourus troilus
May 27, 2007 These butterflies are going to be starting a new generation soon! :) The mated female will lay her eggs on the leaves of a Spicebush or sassafras tree. These butterflies look a lot like the Pipevine Swallowtail.
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68 <strong>Spicebush Swallowtail Butterfly</strong><br><em>Pterourus troilus</em>

Spicebush Swallowtail Butterfly
Pterourus troilus

Spicebush Swallowtail Butterfly
Pterourus troilus This butterfly is a bit on the ragged side, but at least it shows the difference between it and the Pipevine Swallowtail. I photographed it at Haw Ridge in 2006.
1678
69 <strong>Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar</strong>

These caterpillars often hide in rolled up Spicebush leaves during the day. The large black and yellow spots on the thorax are used to frighten predators, such as birds. These caterpillars turn oran...

Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar These caterpillars often hide in rolled up Spicebush leaves during the day. The large black and yellow spots on the thorax are used to frighten predators, such as birds. These caterpillars turn oran...

Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar These caterpillars often hide in rolled up Spicebush leaves during the day. The large black and yellow spots on the thorax are used to frighten predators, such as birds. These caterpillars turn orange just before becoming a pupa. 1472
70 A funny-faced Spicebush Caterpillar

A funny-faced Spicebush Caterpillar

A funny-faced Spicebush Caterpillar 822
71 <strong>Pipevine Swallowtail Butterfly</strong><br> <em>Battus philenor</em><br> April 22, 2006<br>

Pipevine Swallowtail Butterfly
Battus philenor
April 22, 2006

Pipevine Swallowtail Butterfly
Battus philenor
April 22, 2006
These beautiful butterflies lay their eggs on the large, heart-shaped Dutchman's Pipe vine leaves. The caterpillars are black with reddish-orange spikes. See the following photo to see the butterfly with its' wings closed, it looks very different.
1313
72 These 3 Pipevine Swallowtails were on Turks Cap Lilies.

These 3 Pipevine Swallowtails were on Turks Cap Lilies.

These 3 Pipevine Swallowtails were on Turks Cap Lilies. This photo was my first magazine cover shot, it was used on the Tennessee Conservationist. 939
73 <strong>Pipevine Swallowtail</strong><br><em>Battus philenor</em>

Pipevine Swallowtail
Battus philenor

Pipevine Swallowtail
Battus philenor Butterfly and moth wings are covered with thousands of tiny scales. The irridescent blue color comes from the refraction of light from microscopic lines on the scales of the wings.
1135
74 <strong>Pipevine Swallowtail Butterfly</strong> with wings closed

Pipevine Swallowtail Butterfly with wings closed

Pipevine Swallowtail Butterfly with wings closed 1158
75 This was an injured Pipevine Swallowtail Caterpillar that we found on the ground at Piney River. As their name implies, these caterpillars eat the leaves of the Dutchman's Pipevine.

This was an injured Pipevine Swallowtail Caterpillar that we found on the ground at Piney River. As their name implies, these caterpillars eat the leaves of the Dutchman's Pipevine.

This was an injured Pipevine Swallowtail Caterpillar that we found on the ground at Piney River. As their name implies, these caterpillars eat the leaves of the Dutchman's Pipevine. 1811
76 <strong>Black Swallowtail Butterfly</strong> <br><em>Papilio polyxenes</em><br>

Black Swallowtail Butterfly
Papilio polyxenes

Black Swallowtail Butterfly
Papilio polyxenes
I found this butterfly high in the mountains in the Smokies. I was surprised it was able to fly because one of its lower wings was broken. The caterpillars of these butterflies eat parsley.
1357
77 <strong>Black Swallowtail</strong><br><em>Papilio polyxenes</em><br>Max Patch, NC<br>August 10, 2008

Black Swallowtail
Papilio polyxenes
Max Patch, NC
August 10, 2008

Black Swallowtail
Papilio polyxenes
Max Patch, NC
August 10, 2008 I found this butterfly sipping nectar from flowers in a meadow at Max Patch. The caterpillars of these butterflies eat parsley.
768
78 This <strong>Black Swallowtail Caterpillar </strong> was found on a Filmy Angelica leaf near Clingmans Dome.

This Black Swallowtail Caterpillar was found on a Filmy Angelica leaf near Clingmans Dome.

This Black Swallowtail Caterpillar was found on a Filmy Angelica leaf near Clingmans Dome. 916
79 Anise Swallowtail Caterpillar

Anise Swallowtail Caterpillar

Anise Swallowtail Caterpillar 1017
80 <strong>Zebra Swallowtail</strong><br><em>Eurytides marcellus</em><br>Oak Ridge, TN<br>June 2, 2008

Zebra Swallowtail
Eurytides marcellus
Oak Ridge, TN
June 2, 2008

Zebra Swallowtail
Eurytides marcellus
Oak Ridge, TN
June 2, 2008 This beautiful Zebra Swallowtail butterfly decided to visit us during Science Camp. It found the a couple of the boys' shoes to be irresistible (probably the sweat!). At least a shoe is not as unpleasant as dog poop, like some of my other photos were taken on! Of course, I quickly said, "Don't move, I need a picture of this butterfly for my website!" The boy took his shoe off to make it easier for me to take the photo. The kids were excited too because this is Tennessee's State Butterfly.
900
81 Zebra Swallowtail
Eurytides marcellus

This is a side view of the butterfly (on another boy's shoe!). Note the red scales on the lower wings.

Zebra Swallowtail Eurytides marcellus This is a side view of the butterfly (on another boy's shoe!). Note the red scales on the lower wings.

Zebra Swallowtail Eurytides marcellus This is a side view of the butterfly (on another boy's shoe!). Note the red scales on the lower wings. 855
82 This Zebra Swallowtail eluded me as we hiked at Haw Ridge in mid-April 2009. I was able to snap this shot before it took off again.

This Zebra Swallowtail eluded me as we hiked at Haw Ridge in mid-April 2009. I was able to snap this shot before it took off again.

This Zebra Swallowtail eluded me as we hiked at Haw Ridge in mid-April 2009. I was able to snap this shot before it took off again. 684
83 <strong>Baltimore Checkerspot</strong><br><em>Euphydryas phaeton</em><br>Oak Ridge, TN <br>May 5, 2006<br>***An Anderson county record butterfly!***

Baltimore Checkerspot
Euphydryas phaeton
Oak Ridge, TN
May 5, 2006
***An Anderson county record butterfly!***

Baltimore Checkerspot
Euphydryas phaeton
Oak Ridge, TN
May 5, 2006
***An Anderson county record butterfly!*** This butterfly was "puddling" (drinking liquids) on the site of a dead skunk! My friend Debbie and I found the skunk remains while hiking at Haw Ridge. There was fur along the side of the trail but the carcass was gone. Fortunately, the smell was not too bad. This butterfly hardly moved when I got in close to get its photograph, it must have really liked what it was drinking! :( I like the fuzzy orange "face" and the checkerboard compound eyes!
2418
84 I was glad I found this <strong>Baltimore-checkerspot Butterfly</strong> on a flower instead of a dead skunk! I found it  in one of the powerline cuts at Haw Ridge. The following photo shows it with its wings open.

I was glad I found this Baltimore-checkerspot Butterfly on a flower instead of a dead skunk! I found it in one of the powerline cuts at Haw Ridge. The following photo shows it with its wings open.

I was glad I found this Baltimore-checkerspot Butterfly on a flower instead of a dead skunk! I found it in one of the powerline cuts at Haw Ridge. The following photo shows it with its wings open. 1042
85 There were lots of these  Baltimore-checkerspot Butterflies on the Fleabane at Haw Ridge.

There were lots of these Baltimore-checkerspot Butterflies on the Fleabane at Haw Ridge.

There were lots of these Baltimore-checkerspot Butterflies on the Fleabane at Haw Ridge. 1023
86 <strong>Baltimore Checkerspot Caterpillar </strong>
Frozen Head State Park 
May 5, 2008

The bright coloration and spikes on this caterpillar make me suspect that it is probably unpalatable to birds and other predators.

Baltimore Checkerspot Caterpillar Frozen Head State Park May 5, 2008 The bright coloration and spikes on this caterpillar make me suspect that it is probably unpalatable to birds and other predators.

Baltimore Checkerspot Caterpillar Frozen Head State Park May 5, 2008 The bright coloration and spikes on this caterpillar make me suspect that it is probably unpalatable to birds and other predators. 1049
87 <strong>Buckeye Butterfly</strong><br><em>Precis coenia</em><br>August 27, 2007

Buckeye Butterfly
Precis coenia
August 27, 2007

Buckeye Butterfly
Precis coenia
August 27, 2007 Next to the Monarch, this is my second-favorite butterfly. It had eluded me for a long time, this species is not very tolerant of people with cameras! I was in the garden at my school when it caught my eye. I had my little pocket camera, so I had to get within a couple of feet away. Every time I would get the camera focused in the LCD viewfinder, the butterfly would take off! I would follow it until it landed on a flower then repeat the process. Finally, after about 20 minutes, I got this shot! Fortunately, it was after the students had left, they might have thought I was crazy wandering around the garden after a butterfly! :) The Buckeye has lovely false eyespots used for frightening away predators. The following photo is a view with the wings closed.
1372
88 The <strong>Buckeye Butterfly</strong> with its wings closed. The outside of the wings have small eyespots too.

The Buckeye Butterfly with its wings closed. The outside of the wings have small eyespots too.

The Buckeye Butterfly with its wings closed. The outside of the wings have small eyespots too. 827
89 <strong>Buckeye Butterfly Caterpillar</strong>
May 30, 2008

Buckeye Butterfly Caterpillar May 30, 2008

Buckeye Butterfly Caterpillar May 30, 2008 1263
90 <strong>Little Wood Satyr Butterfly</strong><br><em>Megisto cymela</em><br>Oak Ridge, TN<br>June 14, 2008

Little Wood Satyr Butterfly
Megisto cymela
Oak Ridge, TN
June 14, 2008

Little Wood Satyr Butterfly
Megisto cymela
Oak Ridge, TN
June 14, 2008
922
91 Little Wood Satyr Butterfly with closed wings

Little Wood Satyr Butterfly with closed wings

Little Wood Satyr Butterfly with closed wings 716
92 <strong>Northern Pearly-eye Butterfly</strong> <br><em>Enodia anthedon</em>

Northern Pearly-eye Butterfly
Enodia anthedon

Northern Pearly-eye Butterfly
Enodia anthedon This must be a fairly "old" butterfly (relatively speaking!) because of faded pattern on the wings.
1077
93 <strong>Common Wood Nymph Butterfly</strong><br><em>Cercyonis pegala</em><br>Oak Ridge, TN<br>August 17, 2008<br>***An Anderson county record butterfly!***

Common Wood Nymph Butterfly
Cercyonis pegala
Oak Ridge, TN
August 17, 2008
***An Anderson county record butterfly!***

Common Wood Nymph Butterfly
Cercyonis pegala
Oak Ridge, TN
August 17, 2008
***An Anderson county record butterfly!*** This is a really crummy picture because this butterfly would not cooperate!
807
94 <strong>Hackberry Butterfly</strong> <br><em>Asterocampa celtis</em> / Brushfooted butterfly family<br>July 30, 2007

Hackberry Butterfly
Asterocampa celtis / Brushfooted butterfly family
July 30, 2007

Hackberry Butterfly
Asterocampa celtis / Brushfooted butterfly family
July 30, 2007 This butterfly became a close companion to my friend Diana's daughter, Sara, while we hiked at Ijams. Actually "friendship" had nothing to do with it, the butterfly was attracted to her cocoa-scented sunscreen! Butterflies often land on people to drink their sweat in order to get salt and minerals they need.
1138
95 <strong>Hackberry Butterfly</strong> with wings closed
<em>Asterocampa celtis</em> / Brushfooted butterfly family
Ijams Nature Center
July 30, 2007

Hackberry Butterfly with wings closed Asterocampa celtis / Brushfooted butterfly family Ijams Nature Center July 30, 2007

Hackberry Butterfly with wings closed Asterocampa celtis / Brushfooted butterfly family Ijams Nature Center July 30, 2007 785
96 Sarah with her new hiking buddy, a Hackberry Butterfly!

Sarah with her new hiking buddy, a Hackberry Butterfly!

Sarah with her new hiking buddy, a Hackberry Butterfly! 837
97 <strong>Question Mark and Northern Pearly Eye Butterflies</strong> feeding on dog poop

Question Mark and Northern Pearly Eye Butterflies feeding on dog poop

Question Mark and Northern Pearly Eye Butterflies feeding on dog poop 918
98 The <strong>Comma Butterfly</strong><br> <em>Polygonia comma</em>

The Comma Butterfly
Polygonia comma

The Comma Butterfly gets its name from the small white comma-shaped mark on the closed wings. These butterflies are well camouflaged, the wings look like dead leaves. Another of these "anglewing" butterflies is called the "Question Mark" butterfly. (See next photo) 1454
99 <strong>Eastern Comma Butterfly </strong>
<em>Polygonia comma</em>
Great Smoky Mountains National Park - North Carolina side
October 8, 2009

These are very difficult butterflies to photograph, they don't stay in one place long enough to get the c...

Eastern Comma Butterfly Polygonia comma Great Smoky Mountains National Park - North Carolina side October 8, 2009 These are very difficult butterflies to photograph, they don't stay in one place long enough to get the c...

Eastern Comma Butterfly Polygonia comma Great Smoky Mountains National Park - North Carolina side October 8, 2009 These are very difficult butterflies to photograph, they don't stay in one place long enough to get the camera in focus! These butterflies could easily be confused with the closely-related Question Mark. The following photo shows the white "comma" mark on the underside of the lower wings. 795
100 <strong>Eastern Comma Butterfly</strong> - note the little white "comma" mark on the underside of the lower wing.

Eastern Comma Butterfly - note the little white "comma" mark on the underside of the lower wing.

Eastern Comma Butterfly - note the little white "comma" mark on the underside of the lower wing. 693
101 <strong>Question Mark Butterfly</strong> - with closed wings<br><em>Polygonia interrogationis</em> / Brush-footed butterfly Family<br>May 22, 2007

Question Mark Butterfly - with closed wings
Polygonia interrogationis / Brush-footed butterfly Family
May 22, 2007

Question Mark Butterfly - with closed wings
Polygonia interrogationis / Brush-footed butterfly Family
May 22, 2007 Note the small white "?" on the hindwing of this butterfly. Question Marks are in the Brush-footed butterfly family, these butterflies have only 4 legs visible, the front 2 are vestigial and not used for walking. I found this one at the University of Tennessee Arboretum on dog poop. These butterflies are well camouflaged with their wings closed, but very bright with them open. (See next photo)
975
102 Question Mark Butterfly with closed wings

Question Mark Butterfly with closed wings

Question Mark Butterfly with closed wings 811
103 <b>Question Mark Butterfly</b>

Question Mark Butterfly

Question Mark Butterfly 1513
104 <strong>Question Mark Butterfly</strong> - with open wings<br><em>Polygonia interrogationis</em><br>May 22, 2007

Question Mark Butterfly - with open wings
Polygonia interrogationis
May 22, 2007

Question Mark Butterfly - with open wings
Polygonia interrogationis
May 22, 2007 These butterflies have a slightly different coloration in the summer broods than the fall broods. The summer ones have a light rim around the wing edges.
1281
105 <strong>Snout Butterfly</strong> <br><em>Libytheana bachmanii</em><br>Oak Ridge, TN<br>July 2008<br>***An Anderson County, TN record butterfly!***

Snout Butterfly
Libytheana bachmanii
Oak Ridge, TN
July 2008
***An Anderson County, TN record butterfly!***

Snout Butterfly
Libytheana bachmanii
Oak Ridge, TN
July 2008
***An Anderson County, TN record butterfly!*** These butterflies are very humorous-looking; they are the "Jimmy Durantes" of the lepidoptera order!
1254
106 <strong>Orange Sulphur Butterfly</strong> "Alfalfa Butterfly"<br><em>Colias eurytheme</em>

Orange Sulphur Butterfly "Alfalfa Butterfly"
Colias eurytheme

Orange Sulphur Butterfly "Alfalfa Butterfly"
Colias eurytheme I got a kick out of this butterfly as it appeared to peek through the Blazing Star flowers.
1521
107 <strong>Sulphur Butterfly</strong> on Cardinal Flower at Frozen Head State Park.

Sulphur Butterfly on Cardinal Flower at Frozen Head State Park.

Sulphur Butterfly on Cardinal Flower at Frozen Head State Park. 1042
108 <strong>Cabbage White Butterfly</strong><br><em>Artogeia rapae*</em>

Cabbage White Butterfly
Artogeia rapae*

Cabbage White Butterfly
Artogeia rapae* I photographed this pretty little butterfly in the garden at my school. This butterfly would have started out life as a caterpillar eating cabbage, broccoli, or other plants in the Mustard family. These non-natives can be a pest in the garden.
1682
109 <strong>Checkered White</strong> <br><em>Pontia protodice</em><br>Oak Ridge, TN<br>Sept. 7, 2007

Checkered White
Pontia protodice
Oak Ridge, TN
Sept. 7, 2007

Checkered White
Pontia protodice
Oak Ridge, TN
Sept. 7, 2007
1096
110 <strong>Alfalfa Butterflies</strong><br><em>Colias eurytheme</em> / Lepidoptera<br>Oak Ridge, TN<br>May 31, 2008

Alfalfa Butterflies
Colias eurytheme / Lepidoptera
Oak Ridge, TN
May 31, 2008

Alfalfa Butterflies
Colias eurytheme / Lepidoptera
Oak Ridge, TN
May 31, 2008 This pair was "courting" on a clover plant. The male is the brighter colored butterfly on the left. The female has the end of her abdomen raised as an invitation to mate.
966
111 <b>Duskywing Skipper</b><br>Virgin Falls State Natural Area

Duskywing Skipper
Virgin Falls State Natural Area

Duskywing Skipper
Virgin Falls State Natural Area
832
112 <strong>Falcate Orange-tip Butterfly</strong><br><em>Anthocharis midea</em><br>Knoxville, TN <br>(House Mountain SNA) - Knox Co.<br>April 10, 2010

Falcate Orange-tip Butterfly
Anthocharis midea
Knoxville, TN
(House Mountain SNA) - Knox Co.
April 10, 2010

Falcate Orange-tip Butterfly
Anthocharis midea
Knoxville, TN
(House Mountain SNA) - Knox Co.
April 10, 2010 After chasing these butterflies for 2 days, I finally managed to get this shot. It is not great, but it beats not having any photo at all! The males are easy to distinguish due to the bright orange tips on the wings, the females do not have these marks. The caterpillars of this butterfly feed on plants of the Mustard Family.
935
113 <strong>West Virginia White Butterfly</strong><br><em>Artogeia virginiensis</em><br>Frozen Head State Park - Morgan Co. <br>May 4, 2010

West Virginia White Butterfly
Artogeia virginiensis
Frozen Head State Park - Morgan Co.
May 4, 2010

West Virginia White Butterfly
Artogeia virginiensis
Frozen Head State Park - Morgan Co.
May 4, 2010
935
114 <strong>Pepper and Salt Skipper</strong>
<em>Amblyscirtes hegon</em> 
Frozen Head State Park - Morgan Co. 
May 4, 2010

Pepper and Salt Skipper Amblyscirtes hegon Frozen Head State Park - Morgan Co. May 4, 2010

Pepper and Salt Skipper Amblyscirtes hegon Frozen Head State Park - Morgan Co. May 4, 2010 845
115 <strong>Zabulon Skipper</strong> - male
<em>Poanes zabulon</em> 
Frozen Head State Park - Morgan Co.
May 4, 2010

Thanks to the folks at BAMONA for helping me ID this skipper!

Zabulon Skipper - male Poanes zabulon Frozen Head State Park - Morgan Co. May 4, 2010 Thanks to the folks at BAMONA for helping me ID this skipper!

Zabulon Skipper - male Poanes zabulon Frozen Head State Park - Morgan Co. May 4, 2010 Thanks to the folks at BAMONA for helping me ID this skipper! 1096

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