Insects IV - True Flies, Dragonflies and insects with "fly" in their name

This gallery has flies, gnats, mosquitoes, dragonflies, damselflies, scorpionflies etc.
Image Number Image (Click to Enlarge)CaptionImage Viewed
1 <strong>Katydid</strong> being parasitized by a <strong>Tachnid Fly</strong>
<em>Microcentrum retinerve</em> / Orthoptera
This male Katydid has just been doomed to death by this female Tachnid Fly. When the parasitic fly swooped down to lay her egg o...

Katydid being parasitized by a Tachnid Fly Microcentrum retinerve / Orthoptera This male Katydid has just been doomed to death by this female Tachnid Fly. When the parasitic fly swooped down to lay her egg o...

Katydid being parasitized by a Tachnid Fly Microcentrum retinerve / Orthoptera This male Katydid has just been doomed to death by this female Tachnid Fly. When the parasitic fly swooped down to lay her egg on the katydid he struggled to avoid her, notice how his abdomen is pulled up toward his thorax. The egg will hatch a small maggot which will bury into the katydid to eat him alive. These flies will parasitize caterpillars too. Katydids, grasshoppers, and crickets are in the order Orthoptera, which means "straight-wing". 1723
2 <b>Fly haltere</b>

Fly haltere

Fly haltere True flies have only 2 wings, they are in the Order Diptera. The other two wings have been reduced in size and shape to small stalks with a knob, called "halteres". These structures act as stabilizers for the insect. The other way to know if an insect is a true fly is in its name, if the word "fly" is a separate word it is a fly (i.e. "house fly"). If the word "fly" is connected it is not a true fly (i.e. "dragonfly"). 248
3 <b>Deerfly eyes</b>

Deerfly eyes

Deerfly eyes Like other insects, flies have compound eyes that are made up of thousands of smaller faceted eyes. Insects don't see one image per facet, they see objects in a distorted, somewhat blurred view. They are very sensitive to movement however, that's why it's so hard to swat a fly! It is interesting how the compound eyes refract the light into many different colors on some insects! This Deer Fly is probably a male, due to the fact the eyes nearly meet a the center of the head. 265
4 <b>A close-up of a Fly</b>

A close-up of a Fly

A close-up of a Fly This persistent Fly was on my pant leg during a Bugguide Gathering 2008 picnic in the Great Smoky Mountains NP. Since I had my camera I thought I should take advantage of its close proximity! :) This photo shows how flies can carry germs on their hairy bodies. I just hope it was not regurgitating on my pants! Yucch! :( 601
5 A housefly's mouth, called a <em>proboscis</em>, is like a ridged sponge. When it eats it regurgitates a bit of stomach fluid, <u>and</u> part of its' last meal, on its food (a nice thought, especially if the last meal was a cow patty or a dead opossum...

A housefly's mouth, called a proboscis, is like a ridged sponge. When it eats it regurgitates a bit of stomach fluid, and part of its' last meal, on its food (a nice thought, especially if the last meal was a cow patty or a dead opossum...

A housefly's mouth, called a proboscis, is like a ridged sponge. When it eats it regurgitates a bit of stomach fluid, and part of its' last meal, on its food (a nice thought, especially if the last meal was a cow patty or a dead opossum!!!). Enzymes in the stomach fluid help liquify the new meal which will also be lapped up by the sponge-like mouth. Note the hairs on the fly's body, these hairs make flies very good at spreading germs. The ants in this photo were drinking oozing tree sap. I was very anxious for a warm day to go out and find insects to photograph with my new macro lens, I really was desperate if I had to settle for ants and a fly! 690
6 Flies taste with their feet, when they rub their front legs together they are tasting chemicals on the surface where they are standing. This fly had just been walking on a tree that was dripping sap.

Flies taste with their feet, when they rub their front legs together they are tasting chemicals on the surface where they are standing. This fly had just been walking on a tree that was dripping sap.

Flies taste with their feet, when they rub their front legs together they are tasting chemicals on the surface where they are standing. This fly had just been walking on a tree that was dripping sap. 700
7 <strong>Maggots</strong> day1

Maggots day1

Maggots day1 "Baby" flies are called maggots. They eat decaying plant and animal matter. As nasty as maggots look, they perform a very important function as "Mother Nature's Recyclers" by returning nutrients to the environment. 584
8 Yes, I know this is a gross picture, but it shows the important role that flies play in the recycling of dead animals. Without the help of fly maggots, it would take much longer for bacteria and fungi to decompose carrion, such as this roadkill raccoon...

Yes, I know this is a gross picture, but it shows the important role that flies play in the recycling of dead animals. Without the help of fly maggots, it would take much longer for bacteria and fungi to decompose carrion, such as this roadkill raccoon...

Yes, I know this is a gross picture, but it shows the important role that flies play in the recycling of dead animals. Without the help of fly maggots, it would take much longer for bacteria and fungi to decompose carrion, such as this roadkill raccoon. Flies, their larvae and pupae have been used in identifying the time of death in homicide cases because timing of their metamorphosis is so well understood. 587
9 No, this is not a small snake or a large worm, it is a moving mass of <strong>Fungus Gnat larvae</strong> <em>(Sciaridae</em> spp.)! A group of campers at my 2005 science camp found these migrating maggots crossing the road the day after a big rain. Th...

No, this is not a small snake or a large worm, it is a moving mass of Fungus Gnat larvae (Sciaridae spp.)! A group of campers at my 2005 science camp found these migrating maggots crossing the road the day after a big rain. Th...

No, this is not a small snake or a large worm, it is a moving mass of Fungus Gnat larvae (Sciaridae spp.)! A group of campers at my 2005 science camp found these migrating maggots crossing the road the day after a big rain. The cohesive mass moved as a group to take on the appearance of a larger organism as a method of protection. I was thrilled to learn that Fungus gnats are responsible for pollinating Jack-in-the-Pulpit flowers! Cool! Gnats, other flies, beetles, bees, ants, and many other insects go through complete metamorphosis. "Meta" means change, "morpho" means shape. All insects start out their life in the egg stage. An insect that goes through complete metamorphosis hatches from the egg as a larva. The larva is the "eating, pooping, growing and molting" stage of the insect's life. Some insects gain several thousand times their hatching weight and grow greatly in length at this stage. After molting up to 5 times the larva goes through the next stage of major changes. The larva sheds its' skin and becomes a pupa, in butterflies this is a chrysalis, in a moth it is a cocoon. In the pupa stage the insect becomes a soupy mix of rearranging cells, in time a new mouth, a different body shape, internal organs and wings develop. Soon the adult emerges from the larval stage. Some adult insects live for a very short time, some have no mouth and don't eat. Only adult insects have wings and are able to breed. 2072
10 <strong>Male and Female Crane Flies</strong> 
<em>Tipula bicornis</em> / Diptera 
May 11, 2007
Crane flies look like giant mosquitoes, but they do not bite. The female is the fly on the left, she has a thicker and more pointed abdomen. The male's ab...

Male and Female Crane Flies Tipula bicornis / Diptera May 11, 2007 Crane flies look like giant mosquitoes, but they do not bite. The female is the fly on the left, she has a thicker and more pointed abdomen. The male's ab...

Male and Female Crane Flies Tipula bicornis / Diptera May 11, 2007 Crane flies look like giant mosquitoes, but they do not bite. The female is the fly on the left, she has a thicker and more pointed abdomen. The male's abdomen has claspers for mating. True flies are in the order Diptera, meaning "2-winged"; all other winged insects have 4 wings. Flies have small, knobbed vestigal wings called "halteres" which are used as stabilizers. The halteres are not visible on these insects. True flies have the name "fly" as a second word, as opposed to a butterfly or dragonfly which are not flies. 1205
11 The halteres of this Cranefly are easy to see in this photo. My mother laughed when she walked by the bathroom and saw me with the tripod on the vanity counter focusing on this guy! Having strange insects in the house is just part of living in the wood...

The halteres of this Cranefly are easy to see in this photo. My mother laughed when she walked by the bathroom and saw me with the tripod on the vanity counter focusing on this guy! Having strange insects in the house is just part of living in the wood...

The halteres of this Cranefly are easy to see in this photo. My mother laughed when she walked by the bathroom and saw me with the tripod on the vanity counter focusing on this guy! Having strange insects in the house is just part of living in the woods in Florida! The halteres are easy to see on this crane fly. Halteres are vestigial wings that flies have, they are used to help stabilize the insect when it flies. 923
12 <strong>Cranefly</strong><em>Tipula</em> sp.Sept. 2007My students were pretty shaken up when they  saw this Crane Fly. They thought it was a giant mosquito! I explained that it was nothing to be afraid of, they have no mouth as an adult and can...

CraneflyTipula sp.Sept. 2007My students were pretty shaken up when they saw this Crane Fly. They thought it was a giant mosquito! I explained that it was nothing to be afraid of, they have no mouth as an adult and can...

Crane Fly Tipula sp. Sept. 2007 My students were pretty shaken up when they saw this Crane Fly. They thought it was a giant mosquito! I explained that it was nothing to be afraid of, they have no mouth as an adult and can't bite. Crane flies lay their eggs in water which develop into large aquatic larvae. (see next photo) 948
13 This <strong>Crane Fly larva</strong> was caught by some students during a Stream Ecology class. It was put into a white tray for observing. It breathes through the little projections on the upper end. For a fun test on freshwater critter knowledge, tr...

This Crane Fly larva was caught by some students during a Stream Ecology class. It was put into a white tray for observing. It breathes through the little projections on the upper end. For a fun test on freshwater critter knowledge, tr...

This Crane Fly larva was caught by some students during a Stream Ecology class. It was put into a white tray for observing. It breathes through the little projections on the upper end. For a fun test on freshwater critter knowledge, try this website: aquatic critters game 900
14 <strong>Phantom Crane Fly</strong><em>Bittacomorpha</em> spp. Oak Ridge, TN June 18, 2010

Phantom Crane FlyBittacomorpha spp. Oak Ridge, TN June 18, 2010

Phantom Crane FlyBittacomorpha spp. Oak Ridge, TN June 18, 2010 These are very bizarre insects, they fly with their legs sticking straight out like this, they appear to float through the air. 717
15 This Crane Fly has been  attacked by fungus and nearly engulfed by it. And you thought Athlete's Foot or Ringworm were bad!

This Crane Fly has been attacked by fungus and nearly engulfed by it. And you thought Athlete's Foot or Ringworm were bad!

This Crane Fly has been attacked by fungus and nearly engulfed by it. And you thought Athlete's Foot or Ringworm were bad! 765
16 <strong>Fly Parasitized by fungus</strong>
<em>Entomophthora muscae</em> (fungus)
Great Smoky Mountains NP
August 9, 2008

After a lunch stop at a parking area on Clingman's Dome Road during the 2008 Bugguide Gathering, I noticed several dead flie...

Fly Parasitized by fungus Entomophthora muscae (fungus) Great Smoky Mountains NP August 9, 2008 After a lunch stop at a parking area on Clingman's Dome Road during the 2008 Bugguide Gathering, I noticed several dead flie...

Fly Parasitized by fungus Entomophthora muscae (fungus) Great Smoky Mountains NP August 9, 2008 After a lunch stop at a parking area on Clingman's Dome Road during the 2008 Bugguide Gathering, I noticed several dead flies attached to leaves along a trail. The Entomophthora muscae fungus attacks the fly's internal organs, "saving" the brain for last. Just before the fly succumbs to the fungus it climbs to the top of a leaf. The pale fungus and white "spore cases" can be seen on the fly's abdomen. By causing the fly to climb to the end of a leaf, the fungus has a better chance of spreading its spores to uninfected flies nearby. Oooh, it is almost like a "B" science fiction movie! Click link to learn more about the complicated life cycle of the fungus life cycle. 856
17 <strong>Asian Tiger Mosquito</strong>
<em>Aedes albopictus</em> / Diptera
August 13, 2007
While I was taking pictures of the ladybug pupa I felt something on my leg, I looked down and saw this mosquito getting ready to bite me. I had been wanting a ...

Asian Tiger Mosquito Aedes albopictus / Diptera August 13, 2007 While I was taking pictures of the ladybug pupa I felt something on my leg, I looked down and saw this mosquito getting ready to bite me. I had been wanting a ...

Asian Tiger Mosquito Aedes albopictus / Diptera August 13, 2007 While I was taking pictures of the ladybug pupa I felt something on my leg, I looked down and saw this mosquito getting ready to bite me. I had been wanting a photo of a mosquito for this gallery, so this was the only time I have ever wanted a mosquito to land on me! Had I not squashed her after taking this photo (I do have my limits!), she would have probed around with her mouthparts in search of a capillary under my skin. Her mouth has 6 small needle-like stylets for injecting and drinking. Once she located a capillary she would have injected an anticoagulant to keep my blood from clotting, then she would have proceeded to drink her fill. The problem with mosquitoes is that they can spread diseases such as Dengue Fever, West Nile Virus, Yellow Fever, Heartworm, Malaria and Equine Encephalitis from infected animals and people. Malaria is not a problem in the U.S., but it is widespread in the warm third world countries. It is spread from person to person through the bites of mosquitoes. Only the females bite, they need a protein-rich blood meal to nourish their eggs which will be deposited in standing water. I guess I need to change the water in my birdbath more often! Unfortunately, the white stripes on the legs are not visible in this photo, that is a good indicator of this species of mosquito. (See next photo to see the stripes) 1016
18 <b>Female Asian Tiger Mosquito</b>

Female Asian Tiger Mosquito

Female Asian Tiger Mosquito Mosquitoes are attracted to the black light and often land on my moth sheet. This one is looking for a meal, but she's not going to get much to eat here! Note the white stripes on her legs. 283
19 <b>Male mosquito</b>

Male mosquito

Male mosquito Male Mosquitoes do not bite or eat blood, they eat flower nectar. They are easy to tell from the females because of their large, fuzzy antennae. They use their antennae to hear the female's wingbeats. If you tap a high C tuning fork and touch it to a balloon, you can hear what a female mosquito's buzz sounds like; it is at a frequency of 512 beats per second. A female mosquito's wings beat near that frequency. 348
20 Tiger Mosquito close-up
I had slapped this mosquito just before she bit me! Note the thin, brown mouthpart that has separated from the black protective sheath. That is what she would have used to obtain a blood meal from my leg. It is composed of smal...

Tiger Mosquito close-up I had slapped this mosquito just before she bit me! Note the thin, brown mouthpart that has separated from the black protective sheath. That is what she would have used to obtain a blood meal from my leg. It is composed of smal...

Tiger Mosquito close-up I had slapped this mosquito just before she bit me! Note the thin, brown mouthpart that has separated from the black protective sheath. That is what she would have used to obtain a blood meal from my leg. It is composed of smaller tubes, some inject an anti-coagulant and the others are used for sucking up blood. 904
21 This male Mosquito was attracted to the light and sheet that was set up at the 2008 Bugguide Gathering at the UT Field Station. Notice his unusual antennae. Male mosquitoes eat nectar, unlike their ravenous, blood-sucking girlfriends!

This male Mosquito was attracted to the light and sheet that was set up at the 2008 Bugguide Gathering at the UT Field Station. Notice his unusual antennae. Male mosquitoes eat nectar, unlike their ravenous, blood-sucking girlfriends!

This male Mosquito was attracted to the light and sheet that was set up at the 2008 Bugguide Gathering at the UT Field Station. Notice his unusual antennae. Male mosquitoes eat nectar, unlike their ravenous, blood-sucking girlfriends! 800
22 <strong>Mosquito larvae</strong>
These mosquito larvae were photographed in a drip pool under a rock ledge along the Piney River. The white dot at the end of the abdomen is where their "breathing tube" opens at the surface of the water. At this point ...

Mosquito larvae These mosquito larvae were photographed in a drip pool under a rock ledge along the Piney River. The white dot at the end of the abdomen is where their "breathing tube" opens at the surface of the water. At this point ...

Mosquito larvae These mosquito larvae were photographed in a drip pool under a rock ledge along the Piney River. The white dot at the end of the abdomen is where their "breathing tube" opens at the surface of the water. At this point of their life, mosquitoes are filter feeders, eating algae and small bits of food in the water. The 2 brush-like mouthparts are visible on the heads of these larvae. It is when they become an adult that the females begin to take a blood meal. Male mosquitoes eat plant juices and nectar. If you have ever wondered what good a mosquito is, the larvae are an important food source for many aquatic animals and the adults feed lots of birds, dragonflies and other animals. 1706
23 A Mosquito larva at 100x magnification. These larvae are often called "wigglers" or "wriggletails" because of the way they wiggle their tail to move down from the surface of the water. The large conical structure on the "tail" (which is actually the en...

A Mosquito larva at 100x magnification. These larvae are often called "wigglers" or "wriggletails" because of the way they wiggle their tail to move down from the surface of the water. The large conical structure on the "tail" (which is actually the en...

A Mosquito larva at 100x magnification. These larvae are often called "wigglers" or "wriggletails" because of the way they wiggle their tail to move down from the surface of the water. The large conical structure on the "tail" (which is actually the end of the abdomen) is the "snorkle" or breathing aparatus. It has 3 flaps at the end which open when the larva is at the surface, it closes when it dives. 713
24 A Mosquito pupa at 100x magnification. While in the pupa stage, the mosquito can move, but it doesn't eat. The large compound eye, the piercing mouth, and developing wings can be seen in this photo. I photographed an image projected on a table top by a...

A Mosquito pupa at 100x magnification. While in the pupa stage, the mosquito can move, but it doesn't eat. The large compound eye, the piercing mouth, and developing wings can be seen in this photo. I photographed an image projected on a table top by a...

A Mosquito pupa at 100x magnification. While in the pupa stage, the mosquito can move, but it doesn't eat. The large compound eye, the piercing mouth, and developing wings can be seen in this photo. I photographed an image projected on a table top by a projection microscope. 711
25 <strong>Long-legged Fly</strong>
<em>Chrysosoma</em> sp.
July 2008

This colorful fly was landing on a milkweed leaf.

Long-legged Fly Chrysosoma sp. July 2008 This colorful fly was landing on a milkweed leaf.

Long-legged Fly Chrysosoma sp. July 2008 This colorful fly was landing on a milkweed leaf. 739
26 <strong>Stilt-legged Fly</strong>
<em>Taeniaptera trivittata</em>
Oak Ridge, TN 
June 2008

These little flies are so funny to watch. They have little white "socks" on their feet! The front feet are nearly in constant motion, rubbing and cleaning ...

Stilt-legged Fly Taeniaptera trivittata Oak Ridge, TN June 2008 These little flies are so funny to watch. They have little white "socks" on their feet! The front feet are nearly in constant motion, rubbing and cleaning ...

Stilt-legged Fly Taeniaptera trivittata Oak Ridge, TN June 2008 These little flies are so funny to watch. They have little white "socks" on their feet! The front feet are nearly in constant motion, rubbing and cleaning the wings and the body. 751
27 <strong>Lovebugs</strong>
<em>Plecia nearctica</em> / Diptera
Milton, FL
August 30, 2008

Thanks to recent rains from Tropical Storm Faye, we had our first introduction to these insects; usually, they are more prevalent in late Sept. or Oct. These...

Lovebugs Plecia nearctica / Diptera Milton, FL August 30, 2008 Thanks to recent rains from Tropical Storm Faye, we had our first introduction to these insects; usually, they are more prevalent in late Sept. or Oct. These...

Lovebugs Plecia nearctica / Diptera Milton, FL August 30, 2008 Thanks to recent rains from Tropical Storm Faye, we had our first introduction to these insects; usually, they are more prevalent in late Sept. or Oct. These flies could be great advertisement icons for one of the major US airlines, they always "fly united"! ;) The female is the larger of the two, but she has the small eyes. 904
28 This is how Lovebugs are most commonly seen --- dead, smashed on the front of a car! The fluids in their bodies can cause damage to the finish of vehicles, so they need to be removed as soon as possible.

This is how Lovebugs are most commonly seen --- dead, smashed on the front of a car! The fluids in their bodies can cause damage to the finish of vehicles, so they need to be removed as soon as possible.

This is how Lovebugs are most commonly seen --- dead, smashed on the front of a car! The fluids in their bodies can cause damage to the finish of vehicles, so they need to be removed as soon as possible. 717
29 <strong>Stilt-legged Fly</strong>
<em>Taeniaptera trivittata</em>
Oak Ridge, TN
June 2008

This stilt-legged fly is cleaning its wings. It is quite a "contortionist"!

Stilt-legged Fly Taeniaptera trivittata Oak Ridge, TN June 2008 This stilt-legged fly is cleaning its wings. It is quite a "contortionist"!

Stilt-legged Fly Taeniaptera trivittata Oak Ridge, TN June 2008 This stilt-legged fly is cleaning its wings. It is quite a "contortionist"! 720
30 A male <strong>Midge</strong> has very feathery antennae. This one was found on the sheet we had set up on the wall at camp, every afternoon we turn on a black light and leave it on all night. The next day the sheet has lots of insects. We often find m...

A male Midge has very feathery antennae. This one was found on the sheet we had set up on the wall at camp, every afternoon we turn on a black light and leave it on all night. The next day the sheet has lots of insects. We often find m...

A male Midge has very feathery antennae. This one was found on the sheet we had set up on the wall at camp, every afternoon we turn on a black light and leave it on all night. The next day the sheet has lots of insects. We often find midge larvae in the lake water when we look through the microscope in our classes at science camp. 1282
31 I was amazed to see several of these male Midges oozing out a brown liquid from the tip of their abdomens each evening around 9:30. I don't know if they were getting prepared to mate or what! I'm sure the other guests at the hotel wondered why I kept f...

I was amazed to see several of these male Midges oozing out a brown liquid from the tip of their abdomens each evening around 9:30. I don't know if they were getting prepared to mate or what! I'm sure the other guests at the hotel wondered why I kept f...

I was amazed to see several of these male Midges oozing out a brown liquid from the tip of their abdomens each evening around 9:30. I don't know if they were getting prepared to mate or what! I'm sure the other guests at the hotel wondered why I kept flashing my camera as I tried to get photos like this. ***Update*** I finally got an answer to this mystery via Dr. Frans Janssens, an entomologist in Belgium I contacted through Bugguide.net! Here is an excerpt from his email. It confirmed what I had suspected. "The large everted forward directed body part is the aedeagus, the male 'external'reproductive organ. The phallus, so to speak. In Diptera the aedeagus can become quite large. It is an everted inflatable copulation structure. In the picture the aedeagus is everted in the correct position for copulation. I have no idea what the brown liquid is about and why the midge dips its abdomen in it." 684
32 <strong>Swarming Chironomid Midges</strong>
These tiny flies can make an autumn afternoon hike interesting when you have to walk through a swarm of them. Fortunately, even though they look like mosquitoes, they do not bite! They are often seen near ri...

Swarming Chironomid Midges These tiny flies can make an autumn afternoon hike interesting when you have to walk through a swarm of them. Fortunately, even though they look like mosquitoes, they do not bite! They are often seen near ri...

Swarming Chironomid Midges These tiny flies can make an autumn afternoon hike interesting when you have to walk through a swarm of them. Fortunately, even though they look like mosquitoes, they do not bite! They are often seen near rivers and slow-moving creeks. I photographed this swarm next to the river below Norris Dam. The swarms are made up mostly of males listening for the frequency of a female's wingbeats. Mated females lay their eggs in water. I often find the tiny worm-like larvae in pond and lake water when I teach my microscope class. See next photo for a larger swarm. 899
33 Kenny and I enjoyed watching clouds of Midges (<em>Chironomidae</em>) as they swarmed near the banks of the Clinch River below Norris Dam in early Nov. 2007. They were backlit by the late afternoon sun. It was amazing to watch them as they came togethe...

Kenny and I enjoyed watching clouds of Midges (Chironomidae) as they swarmed near the banks of the Clinch River below Norris Dam in early Nov. 2007. They were backlit by the late afternoon sun. It was amazing to watch them as they came togethe...

Kenny and I enjoyed watching clouds of Midges (Chironomidae) as they swarmed near the banks of the Clinch River below Norris Dam in early Nov. 2007. They were backlit by the late afternoon sun. It was amazing to watch them as they came together in clouds and then dispersed. Fortunately, these little flies don't bite! 856
34 <strong>Drain Fly; Moth Fly; Sewer Gnat</strong>
Oak Ridge, TN (in my bathroom!)
August 20, 2008

This is one of those weird little flies that seem to appear out of nowhere in the bathroom. I learned, after doing some reading on the internet, that ...

Drain Fly; Moth Fly; Sewer Gnat Oak Ridge, TN (in my bathroom!) August 20, 2008 This is one of those weird little flies that seem to appear out of nowhere in the bathroom. I learned, after doing some reading on the internet, that ...

Drain Fly; Moth Fly; Sewer Gnat Oak Ridge, TN (in my bathroom!) August 20, 2008 This is one of those weird little flies that seem to appear out of nowhere in the bathroom. I learned, after doing some reading on the internet, that they actually come out of the bathroom sink or shower drain (as I had long suspected). The larvae eat the gunk in the drains! Yucch! It looks like I need to do some drain cleaning. :( If they weren't so annoying, they would be kind of cute! I didn't realize how fuzzy they are until I zoomed in on this one with my macro lens, it is not hard to see why they are called a "Moth Fly". That name doesn't sound quite as gross as "Sewer Gnat"! 1639
35 A  fuzzy Moth Fly

A fuzzy Moth Fly

A fuzzy Moth Fly 329
36 A Fruitfly?

A Fruitfly?

A Fruitfly? 673
37 Fly with Speckled wings
Great Smoky Mountains NP
August 9, 2008

Fly with Speckled wings Great Smoky Mountains NP August 9, 2008

Fly with Speckled wings Great Smoky Mountains NP August 9, 2008 672
38 <strong>Picture-winged Fly</strong>
Oak Ridge, TN
June 10, 2009

These flies have a funny-looking mouth, it looks like a flattened tube. Their wings are very distinctive.

Picture-winged Fly Oak Ridge, TN June 10, 2009 These flies have a funny-looking mouth, it looks like a flattened tube. Their wings are very distinctive.

Picture-winged Fly Oak Ridge, TN June 10, 2009 These flies have a funny-looking mouth, it looks like a flattened tube. Their wings are very distinctive. 668
39 Fly with no common name
<em>Xenochaetina</em> spp.
Great Smoky Mountains NP
August 9, 2008
Since this fly has no common name, maybe I could make one up for it! :) I saw it at the Sugarlands Visitor Center.

Fly with no common name Xenochaetina spp. Great Smoky Mountains NP August 9, 2008 Since this fly has no common name, maybe I could make one up for it! :) I saw it at the Sugarlands Visitor Center.

Fly with no common name Xenochaetina spp. Great Smoky Mountains NP August 9, 2008 Since this fly has no common name, maybe I could make one up for it! :) I saw it at the Sugarlands Visitor Center. 620
40 The Fly with the green eyes is a type of <strong>Deer Fly</strong>. I <u>HATE</u> these flies, they fly around your head and nail you when you least expect it! This one is not feeding on a deer, but a horse. The smaller fly (maybe a <strong>Biting Stab...

The Fly with the green eyes is a type of Deer Fly. I HATE these flies, they fly around your head and nail you when you least expect it! This one is not feeding on a deer, but a horse. The smaller fly (maybe a Biting Stab...

The Fly with the green eyes is a type of Deer Fly. I HATE these flies, they fly around your head and nail you when you least expect it! This one is not feeding on a deer, but a horse. The smaller fly (maybe a Biting Stable Fly? Stomoxys calcitrans) is trying to get in on the blood-eating action. It often seems that flies are out to get us when we go outdoors and they are! The good news is that only female flies bite and only a few of those are the blood sucking type. Houseflies have lapping mouthtypes, they don't bite. So, it's not as bad as it may seem! :) 1036
41 <strong>"No-See-Ums"</strong>
<em>Culicoides</em> spp. 
These pesky little gals were our "greeting committee" when my family went to the beach in Florida. I snapped this photo before my brother swatted them as they munched on his leg! To be so tiny (...

"No-See-Ums" Culicoides spp. These pesky little gals were our "greeting committee" when my family went to the beach in Florida. I snapped this photo before my brother swatted them as they munched on his leg! To be so tiny (...

"No-See-Ums" Culicoides spp. These pesky little gals were our "greeting committee" when my family went to the beach in Florida. I snapped this photo before my brother swatted them as they munched on his leg! To be so tiny (<1/8"), these biting midges sure can cause a lot of discomfort. They have little piercing mouthparts that they use to drink blood; their bites are not painful, just highly annoying! Like mosquitoes, the females must have a blood meal in order to lay their eggs. Their bites can leave small red spots on the skin. 5173
42 <strong>Horse Fly</strong>
<em>Tabanus</em> spp. / Diptera
This was a huge horsefly that I saw feeding on a horse during a hike at Haw Ridge. Female Horseflies inflict painful bites to obtain a blood meal. Note the small drop of liquid the fly has ex...

Horse Fly Tabanus spp. / Diptera This was a huge horsefly that I saw feeding on a horse during a hike at Haw Ridge. Female Horseflies inflict painful bites to obtain a blood meal. Note the small drop of liquid the fly has ex...

Horse Fly Tabanus spp. / Diptera This was a huge horsefly that I saw feeding on a horse during a hike at Haw Ridge. Female Horseflies inflict painful bites to obtain a blood meal. Note the small drop of liquid the fly has excreted. Not long after I took this photo the owner squashed the fly! There are some animals that I will kill, if it bites me, I squash it! 1117
43 <b>Horse Fly</b> <i>Tabanus</i> spp. / Diptera

Horse Fly Tabanus spp. / Diptera

Horse Fly Tabanus spp. / Diptera My husband has a lot more patience and nerve (and hair!) than I do; I would NEVER let a Horse fly stay on me long enough for someone to photograph it! I just know she would bite me! Only female flies bite, to get a protein-filled blood meal in order to be able to lay eggs and make more little biters! 935
44 <strong>The Fly!</strong> 
This Tachnid fly (Repetitive Tachnid Fly?) eats flower nectar as an adult, but as a larva it was a parasite in a caterpillar.

The Fly! This Tachnid fly (Repetitive Tachnid Fly?) eats flower nectar as an adult, but as a larva it was a parasite in a caterpillar.

The Fly! This Tachnid fly (Repetitive Tachnid Fly?) eats flower nectar as an adult, but as a larva it was a parasite in a caterpillar. 1142
45 <strong>Golden-backed Snipe Fly</strong> 
<em>Chrysopilus thoracicus</em> / Diptera
I found this pretty fly during the 2006 Science Camp in Oak Ridge in June. This one is a male, he has a long, narrow thorax. Thanks to John and Jane, who identified i...

Golden-backed Snipe Fly Chrysopilus thoracicus / Diptera I found this pretty fly during the 2006 Science Camp in Oak Ridge in June. This one is a male, he has a long, narrow thorax. Thanks to John and Jane, who identified i...

Golden-backed Snipe Fly Chrysopilus thoracicus / Diptera I found this pretty fly during the 2006 Science Camp in Oak Ridge in June. This one is a male, he has a long, narrow thorax. Thanks to John and Jane, who identified it for me on bugguide.net 908
46 Golden-backed Snipe Fly  Chrysopilus thoracicus / Diptera

Golden-backed Snipe Fly Chrysopilus thoracicus / Diptera

Golden-backed Snipe Fly Chrysopilus thoracicus / Diptera 255
47 <strong>Robber Fly</strong>
<em>Leptogaster murina</em>?
This funny green-eyed, humpbacked fly accompanied Kenny, my mother and me for a short time on our 2.6 mile round-trip hike to Bear Lake at Krul Lake Recreation Area in Blackwater River State Fo...

Robber Fly Leptogaster murina? This funny green-eyed, humpbacked fly accompanied Kenny, my mother and me for a short time on our 2.6 mile round-trip hike to Bear Lake at Krul Lake Recreation Area in Blackwater River State Fo...

Robber Fly Leptogaster murina? This funny green-eyed, humpbacked fly accompanied Kenny, my mother and me for a short time on our 2.6 mile round-trip hike to Bear Lake at Krul Lake Recreation Area in Blackwater River State Forest in Munson, FL. 1209
48 This <strong>Robber fly</strong> (<em>Laphria divisor</em>) was eating a Japanese beetle. The fly mimics a Bumblebee with its black and yellow coloration.

This Robber fly (Laphria divisor) was eating a Japanese beetle. The fly mimics a Bumblebee with its black and yellow coloration.

This Robber fly (Laphria divisor) was eating a Japanese beetle. The fly mimics a Bumblebee with its black and yellow coloration. 992
49 <strong>Robber flies</strong>
<em>Promachus</em> sp. ?

I saw these Robberflies mating while hiking at Haw Ridge. The female is the one on the right since she has a larger abdomen with the long ovipositor. They caught my eye when they were flying as...

Robber flies Promachus sp. ? I saw these Robberflies mating while hiking at Haw Ridge. The female is the one on the right since she has a larger abdomen with the long ovipositor. They caught my eye when they were flying as...

Robber flies Promachus sp. ? I saw these Robberflies mating while hiking at Haw Ridge. The female is the one on the right since she has a larger abdomen with the long ovipositor. They caught my eye when they were flying as they were connected. Quite an amazing feat of aerodynamics! I took this photo with a 70 - 300mm telephoto lens. 921
50 My educated guess is that this is a Syrphid Fly Larva, it looks like a green, legless maggot. This will probably turn into one of those little Flower flies that look like a bee and can hover in mid-air. The head of this larva is the pointed end on the ...

My educated guess is that this is a Syrphid Fly Larva, it looks like a green, legless maggot. This will probably turn into one of those little Flower flies that look like a bee and can hover in mid-air. The head of this larva is the pointed end on the ...

My educated guess is that this is a Syrphid Fly Larva, it looks like a green, legless maggot. This will probably turn into one of those little Flower flies that look like a bee and can hover in mid-air. The head of this larva is the pointed end on the right side. 635
51 A Syrphid fly larva (left) and pupa on an aphid-infested milkweed leaf. This larva was one of the many aphid munchers that I saw while I was looking at the leaves. Others included Ladybug, Mealybug Destroyer and Lacewing larvae. The aphids were in no d...

A Syrphid fly larva (left) and pupa on an aphid-infested milkweed leaf. This larva was one of the many aphid munchers that I saw while I was looking at the leaves. Others included Ladybug, Mealybug Destroyer and Lacewing larvae. The aphids were in no d...

A Syrphid fly larva (left) and pupa on an aphid-infested milkweed leaf. This larva was one of the many aphid munchers that I saw while I was looking at the leaves. Others included Ladybug, Mealybug Destroyer and Lacewing larvae. The aphids were in no danger of being wiped out however, at the rate they multiply they can easily outpace their predators. The dark brown insect at the right appears to be a syrphid fly pupa. 759
52 I was amazed to watch this natural drama play out before my eyes. A Syrphid larva caught an aphid (top one), a black ant came over to try and attack the larva. A second aphid walked on top of the larva, not a very smart move, but it got away with it th...

I was amazed to watch this natural drama play out before my eyes. A Syrphid larva caught an aphid (top one), a black ant came over to try and attack the larva. A second aphid walked on top of the larva, not a very smart move, but it got away with it th...

I was amazed to watch this natural drama play out before my eyes. A Syrphid larva caught an aphid (top one), a black ant came over to try and attack the larva. A second aphid walked on top of the larva, not a very smart move, but it got away with it that time! The ant is very blurry, but everything happened so fast I didn't have time to get it in focus. 797
53 <strong>Flower Fly</strong> 
<em>Milesia virginiensis</em>
Oak Ridge, TN
This large, colorful fly(a.k.a. Syrphid fly)  would hover motionless other than the blur of its' wings. When it landed on these leaves I was able to quickly snap this picture. ...

Flower Fly Milesia virginiensis Oak Ridge, TN This large, colorful fly(a.k.a. Syrphid fly) would hover motionless other than the blur of its' wings. When it landed on these leaves I was able to quickly snap this picture. ...

Flower Fly Milesia virginiensis Oak Ridge, TN This large, colorful fly(a.k.a. Syrphid fly) would hover motionless other than the blur of its' wings. When it landed on these leaves I was able to quickly snap this picture. The larvae of these flies look a bit like strange caterpillars. Some hover flies look a lot like bees, but they don't sting. When one animal looks like another similar, but unrelated animal, it is called "mimicry". A bird, thinking this fly was a bee, would not eat it. 1059
54 A hovering Hoverfly

A hovering Hoverfly

A hovering Hoverfly 653
55 <strong>Flower Fly</strong>
<em>Chrysotoxum</em> sp.

Flower Fly Chrysotoxum sp.

Flower Fly Chrysotoxum sp. 528
56 <strong>Thick-headed Fly</strong>
<em>Physocephala</em> spp.
Oak Ridge, TN
June 14, 2008
This insect made me do a double-take when I saw it land on my milkweed flowers. I thought it was a really strange-looking wasp until I noticed that it had only...

Thick-headed Fly Physocephala spp. Oak Ridge, TN June 14, 2008 This insect made me do a double-take when I saw it land on my milkweed flowers. I thought it was a really strange-looking wasp until I noticed that it had only...

Thick-headed Fly Physocephala spp. Oak Ridge, TN June 14, 2008 This insect made me do a double-take when I saw it land on my milkweed flowers. I thought it was a really strange-looking wasp until I noticed that it had only 2 wings (note the little yellow halteres). This fly looks so much like a wasp with its metallic, gunbarrel blue wings, black and yellow coloration, and even a "wasp waist". The long pointed object on the head is its proboscis. It drank nectar from the milkweed flowers. 712
57 <strong>Thick-headed Fly</strong> - top view
<em>Physocephala</em> spp.

Thick-headed Fly - top view Physocephala spp.

Thick-headed Fly - top view Physocephala spp. 666
58 Mating Flies are able to fly connected like this! I once had a second grade student who ran up to me during an outdoor insect class, he held out the collection jar and said excitedly, "Look, Mrs. Light, I caught a 2-headed fly!" ;-)

Mating Flies are able to fly connected like this! I once had a second grade student who ran up to me during an outdoor insect class, he held out the collection jar and said excitedly, "Look, Mrs. Light, I caught a 2-headed fly!" ;-)

Mating Flies are able to fly connected like this! I once had a second grade student who ran up to me during an outdoor insect class, he held out the collection jar and said excitedly, "Look, Mrs. Light, I caught a 2-headed fly!" ;-) 791
59 <strong>Mydas Fly</strong>
<em>Mydas clavatus</em>
June 11, 2007
A girl found this big "gunmetal blue" fly on the ground at science camp. It was 1-1/2" long. We may have accidently disturbed an upcoming "romantic encounter" because there was a male ...

Mydas Fly Mydas clavatus June 11, 2007 A girl found this big "gunmetal blue" fly on the ground at science camp. It was 1-1/2" long. We may have accidently disturbed an upcoming "romantic encounter" because there was a male ...

Mydas Fly Mydas clavatus June 11, 2007 A girl found this big "gunmetal blue" fly on the ground at science camp. It was 1-1/2" long. We may have accidently disturbed an upcoming "romantic encounter" because there was a male and female very close by! A side-view photo follows. Thanks to Philip at Bugguide.net for identifying this fly for me! 1015
60 This large blue-gray Mydas Fly had an orange and white segment on its' abdomen, perhaps it was a University of Tennessee Volunteers fan! (For the non-Vols out there, orange and white is UT's school colors). It also had a lapping mouthpart, so obviously...

This large blue-gray Mydas Fly had an orange and white segment on its' abdomen, perhaps it was a University of Tennessee Volunteers fan! (For the non-Vols out there, orange and white is UT's school colors). It also had a lapping mouthpart, so obviously...

This large blue-gray Mydas Fly had an orange and white segment on its' abdomen, perhaps it was a University of Tennessee Volunteers fan! (For the non-Vols out there, orange and white is UT's school colors). It also had a lapping mouthpart, so obviously it was a liquid-eating fly, not a biting kind. 732
61 <strong>Black Horse Fly</strong>
<em>Tabanus atratus</em>
Munson, FL
September 2007

I photographed this unusual Fly in a wetland near Krul Lake in Florida. Thanks to the folks at Bugguide, I learned that she was laying eggs in a ribbon-shaped whi...

Black Horse Fly Tabanus atratus Munson, FL September 2007 I photographed this unusual Fly in a wetland near Krul Lake in Florida. Thanks to the folks at Bugguide, I learned that she was laying eggs in a ribbon-shaped whi...

Black Horse Fly Tabanus atratus Munson, FL September 2007 I photographed this unusual Fly in a wetland near Krul Lake in Florida. Thanks to the folks at Bugguide, I learned that she was laying eggs in a ribbon-shaped white cone. I saw others doing this too. Considering the size of her biting mouthparts, I'm sure glad she was preoccupied with laying eggs! 819
62 <strong>Scorpionfly</strong> - male
<em>Panorpa nebulosa</em> / order: Mecoptera
Great Smoky Mountains National Park
August 9, 2008

I was very happy to get a better photo of a male Scorpionfly (its still not a sharp as I would like, but it beats ...

Scorpionfly - male Panorpa nebulosa / order: Mecoptera Great Smoky Mountains National Park August 9, 2008 I was very happy to get a better photo of a male Scorpionfly (its still not a sharp as I would like, but it beats ...

Scorpionfly - male Panorpa nebulosa / order: Mecoptera Great Smoky Mountains National Park August 9, 2008 I was very happy to get a better photo of a male Scorpionfly (its still not a sharp as I would like, but it beats the first one I took 5 years ago!). Unlike the venomous 8-legged scorpion, this 6-legged insect doesn't sting. The males have a little knob at the end of their abdomen that resembles a scorpion's stinger. Both the male and female have an interesting-looking, pointed head. These insects are quite distinctive looking. 782
63 <strong>Scorpionfly</strong> - Female
<em>Panorpa nebulosa</em> / order: Mecoptera
Great Smoky Mountains National Park
August 9, 2008

I heard a very "punny" joke that only an entomologist would appreciate during the Bugguide gathering! (Complemen...

Scorpionfly - Female Panorpa nebulosa / order: Mecoptera Great Smoky Mountains National Park August 9, 2008 I heard a very "punny" joke that only an entomologist would appreciate during the Bugguide gathering! (Complemen...

Scorpionfly - Female Panorpa nebulosa / order: Mecoptera Great Smoky Mountains National Park August 9, 2008 I heard a very "punny" joke that only an entomologist would appreciate during the Bugguide gathering! (Complements of Eric) Question: "What did the bartender say to the Scorpionfly?" Answer: "Why the long face?" These insects do have a very elongated head. :)The males also have an enlarged knob at the end of the abdomen which looks like a scorpion's stinger. 629
64 I found this female <strong>Stonefly</strong> <em>Acroneuria</em> spp.? on the floor of the dorm at Tremont in the Smokies. She was far away from the river where she needed to be to lay her eggs. I put her on a leaf to be able to photograph her better....

I found this female Stonefly Acroneuria spp.? on the floor of the dorm at Tremont in the Smokies. She was far away from the river where she needed to be to lay her eggs. I put her on a leaf to be able to photograph her better....

I found this female Stonefly Acroneuria spp.? on the floor of the dorm at Tremont in the Smokies. She was far away from the river where she needed to be to lay her eggs. I put her on a leaf to be able to photograph her better. The following photo shows her eggs. Stoneflies are in the order Plecoptera. 809
65 When I turned the Stonefly upside down I noticed her tiny black eggs. They lay their eggs in clean streams and rivers (which she was quite a way from). She was missing a leg and was nearly dead.

When I turned the Stonefly upside down I noticed her tiny black eggs. They lay their eggs in clean streams and rivers (which she was quite a way from). She was missing a leg and was nearly dead.

When I turned the Stonefly upside down I noticed her tiny black eggs. They lay their eggs in clean streams and rivers (which she was quite a way from). She was missing a leg and was nearly dead. 638
66 As their name implies, Stonefly nymphs are often found under rocks in streams. Notice the fringes on the forelegs, they help the nymph swim when necessary.

As their name implies, Stonefly nymphs are often found under rocks in streams. Notice the fringes on the forelegs, they help the nymph swim when necessary.

As their name implies, Stonefly nymphs are often found under rocks in streams. Notice the fringes on the forelegs, they help the nymph swim when necessary. 771
67 This <strong>Stonefly exoskeleton</strong> was found on a rock in the creek near Tremont. The aquatic Stonefly nymphs, called <em>naiads</em> live beneath stones until they metamorphose into adults. Mayfly nymphs can also be found under rocks. The way ...

This Stonefly exoskeleton was found on a rock in the creek near Tremont. The aquatic Stonefly nymphs, called naiads live beneath stones until they metamorphose into adults. Mayfly nymphs can also be found under rocks. The way ...

This Stonefly exoskeleton was found on a rock in the creek near Tremont. The aquatic Stonefly nymphs, called naiads live beneath stones until they metamorphose into adults. Mayfly nymphs can also be found under rocks. The way I teach my students to remember the difference between the two is to think of 3 fingers being held downward, looking like an "M" --- Mayfly nymphs have 3 tails. Stonefly nymphs have 2 tails, think of S-T, Stonefly-two. 738
68 Small winter Stonefly 
<em>Isocapnia</em> sp.
Spring City, TN (Piney River)
March 8, 2009

Small winter Stonefly Isocapnia sp. Spring City, TN (Piney River) March 8, 2009

Small winter Stonefly Isocapnia sp. Spring City, TN (Piney River) March 8, 2009 617
69 <strong>Mayfly</strong>
Order: Ephemeroptera

We see Mayflies in June during Science Camp, the kids enjoy catching them. This one must be a female, judging by the size of the abdomen. After mating, the females lay their eggs in lakes and streams, th...

Mayfly Order: Ephemeroptera We see Mayflies in June during Science Camp, the kids enjoy catching them. This one must be a female, judging by the size of the abdomen. After mating, the females lay their eggs in lakes and streams, th...

Mayfly Order: Ephemeroptera We see Mayflies in June during Science Camp, the kids enjoy catching them. This one must be a female, judging by the size of the abdomen. After mating, the females lay their eggs in lakes and streams, they live only one day as an adult. The mayfly nymphs live in the water for up to a year. The following summer they emerge, mate, lay eggs and then die. 972
70 <strong>Mayfly nymph</strong>
Order: <em>Ephemeroptera</em>
I found this aquatic nymph on a rock at Frozen Head State Park in June 2008. Note the three tails and gills on the sides of the abdomen.

Mayfly nymph Order: Ephemeroptera I found this aquatic nymph on a rock at Frozen Head State Park in June 2008. Note the three tails and gills on the sides of the abdomen.

Mayfly nymph Order: Ephemeroptera I found this aquatic nymph on a rock at Frozen Head State Park in June 2008. Note the three tails and gills on the sides of the abdomen. 710
71 Dragonfly eyes FL3 copy

Dragonfly eyes FL3 copy

Dragonfly eyes FL3 copy Like all insects, dragonflies have compound eyes --- about 50,000 of them! Their vision of movement is incredible. They can see and catch a mosquito while flying at 35 miles per hour! The spiky front 2 pairs of legs are perfectly adapted for capturing and holding small flying insects. 254
72 <strong>Black-shouldered Spinyleg Dragonfly</strong>
<em>Dromogomphus spinosus</em> 

While hiking at Haw Ridge I noticed a commotion in a nearby tree and saw this dragonfly eating a Pipevine Swallowtail butterfly. Dragonflies can carry prey that is...

Black-shouldered Spinyleg Dragonfly Dromogomphus spinosus While hiking at Haw Ridge I noticed a commotion in a nearby tree and saw this dragonfly eating a Pipevine Swallowtail butterfly. Dragonflies can carry prey that is...

Black-shouldered Spinyleg Dragonfly Dromogomphus spinosus While hiking at Haw Ridge I noticed a commotion in a nearby tree and saw this dragonfly eating a Pipevine Swallowtail butterfly. Dragonflies can carry prey that is nearly as large as themselves! I took this photo with a 70 - 300mm telephoto lens. Despite their weight, it pays to carry a variety of lenses! Thanks to Jim Bangma, a dragonfly enthusiast, who helped me identify this and the following "dragons and damsels"! 1078
73 <strong>Widow Skimmer Dragonfly</strong> - female
<em>Libellula lactuosa</em>

 This dragonfly was in a clear plastic cup, caught by a kid at science camp.

Widow Skimmer Dragonfly - female Libellula lactuosa This dragonfly was in a clear plastic cup, caught by a kid at science camp.

Widow Skimmer Dragonfly - female Libellula lactuosa This dragonfly was in a clear plastic cup, caught by a kid at science camp. 655
74 <strong>Widow Skimmer</strong> - male
<em>Libellula luctuosa</em>
Big Ridge State Park
August 16, 2007

I thought of the passage about how "Only mad dogs and Englishmen go out in the mid-day sun" while I was chasing dragonflies on the hottest day ...

Widow Skimmer - male Libellula luctuosa Big Ridge State Park August 16, 2007 I thought of the passage about how "Only mad dogs and Englishmen go out in the mid-day sun" while I was chasing dragonflies on the hottest day ...

Widow Skimmer - male Libellula luctuosa Big Ridge State Park August 16, 2007 I thought of the passage about how "Only mad dogs and Englishmen go out in the mid-day sun" while I was chasing dragonflies on the hottest day of the summer! The high temperature reached 103 degrees F that afternoon! That is really hot for east Tennessee. Fortunately, my nice photos made it worth sweating! This was a really beautiful dragonfly, I enjoyed watching them cruising the edges of the lake. 741
75 <strong>Blue Dasher Dragonfly</strong>
<em>Pachydiplax longipennis</em>

I found this dragonfly at the pond at Haw Ridge. Like all insects, the eyes on a dragonfly are compound. The 50,000 individual eyes make up much of their head so they can see t...

Blue Dasher Dragonfly Pachydiplax longipennis I found this dragonfly at the pond at Haw Ridge. Like all insects, the eyes on a dragonfly are compound. The 50,000 individual eyes make up much of their head so they can see t...

Blue Dasher Dragonfly Pachydiplax longipennis I found this dragonfly at the pond at Haw Ridge. Like all insects, the eyes on a dragonfly are compound. The 50,000 individual eyes make up much of their head so they can see their prey in nearly all directions. They are sometimes referred to as "mosquito hawks" because they catch the insects in midair; they can fly at speeds up to 35 mph. 1446
76 This male <strong>White Tail Dragonfly</strong> (<em>Plathemis lydia</em>)was one of many at the pond at Haw Ridge. I was surprised to see that this dragonfly has something in common with my daughter, her name is Lydia! Male dragonflies are very territ...

This male White Tail Dragonfly (Plathemis lydia)was one of many at the pond at Haw Ridge. I was surprised to see that this dragonfly has something in common with my daughter, her name is Lydia! Male dragonflies are very territ...

This male White Tail Dragonfly (Plathemis lydia)was one of many at the pond at Haw Ridge. I was surprised to see that this dragonfly has something in common with my daughter, her name is Lydia! Male dragonflies are very territorial, they will chase other males away, especially if their mate is nearby. The females dip their tails in the pond to lay their eggs. Sometimes they can be seen trying to lay their eggs on silver-colored car surfaces! The nymph, called a naiad, will hatch from the egg, it lives in the pond for a year or more, eating, growing and molting up to 5 times. 1514
77 I caught this female White Tail Dragonfly in flight as she was laying her eggs. I used my 70 - 300mm telephoto lens to get this shot. Note how the two pairs of wings work opposite of each other, when the front wings are down, the back wings are up.

I caught this female White Tail Dragonfly in flight as she was laying her eggs. I used my 70 - 300mm telephoto lens to get this shot. Note how the two pairs of wings work opposite of each other, when the front wings are down, the back wings are up.

I caught this female White Tail Dragonfly in flight as she was laying her eggs. I used my 70 - 300mm telephoto lens to get this shot. Note how the two pairs of wings work opposite of each other, when the front wings are down, the back wings are up. 694
78 I was very happy to get this photo of a Dragonfly laying her eggs near this rock. Note her mate flying above, a behavior called "hover-guarding". Competing male dragonflies will sometimes scoop out what a previous male has left behind before mating, th...

I was very happy to get this photo of a Dragonfly laying her eggs near this rock. Note her mate flying above, a behavior called "hover-guarding". Competing male dragonflies will sometimes scoop out what a previous male has left behind before mating, th...

I was very happy to get this photo of a Dragonfly laying her eggs near this rock. Note her mate flying above, a behavior called "hover-guarding". Competing male dragonflies will sometimes scoop out what a previous male has left behind (I have to keep this "G-rated"!) before mating, therefore insuring that he will carry on his genes. Dragonflies lay their eggs while in flight, dipping the end of their abdomen in the water. They are attracted to shiny surfaces; I have seen them try to lay eggs on the hood of my silver-colored car! 664
79 <strong>Eastern Pondhawk Dragonflies</strong>
<em>Libellula vibrans</em>
July 29, 2007

I photographed these Dragonflies mating at Ijams Nature Center's pond. This is called a "wheel position". The male is the blue one on the right, the female is g...

Eastern Pondhawk Dragonflies Libellula vibrans July 29, 2007 I photographed these Dragonflies mating at Ijams Nature Center's pond. This is called a "wheel position". The male is the blue one on the right, the female is g...

Eastern Pondhawk Dragonflies Libellula vibrans July 29, 2007 I photographed these Dragonflies mating at Ijams Nature Center's pond. This is called a "wheel position". The male is the blue one on the right, the female is green. The male grasps the female's head with his claspers. The activity only takes a few seconds. Since they have such a complicated mating ritual, I'm referring interested readers to the link: mating dragonflies, the link explains it much better than I could! I got a kick out of the second blue male waiting in the wings (pun intended!) for his chance! Pondhawks are easy to identify because of their green face. 956
80 I photographed this <strong>Dragonfly nymph</strong> (also known as a <em>naiad</em>) at Ijams Nature Center in Knoxville. The nymphs are voracious predators capable of eating minnows, tadpoles and of course, other aquatic insects. They have a hinged j...

I photographed this Dragonfly nymph (also known as a naiad) at Ijams Nature Center in Knoxville. The nymphs are voracious predators capable of eating minnows, tadpoles and of course, other aquatic insects. They have a hinged j...

I photographed this Dragonfly nymph (also known as a naiad) at Ijams Nature Center in Knoxville. The nymphs are voracious predators capable of eating minnows, tadpoles and of course, other aquatic insects. They have a hinged jaw that shoots forward rapidly to capture the prey. Note the Mayfly nymph above (11:00) and the aquatic fly larva on the right (2:00) of the photo. 753
81 There is a LOT of action going on in this photo! Note the 5 dragonflies (the red one at the top is partially obscured) and the blue damselfly in the lower right. The female is laying her eggs near the stick in the water as her mate hovers above. Male d...

There is a LOT of action going on in this photo! Note the 5 dragonflies (the red one at the top is partially obscured) and the blue damselfly in the lower right. The female is laying her eggs near the stick in the water as her mate hovers above. Male d...

There is a LOT of action going on in this photo! Note the 5 dragonflies (the red one at the top is partially obscured) and the blue damselfly in the lower right. The female is laying her eggs near the stick in the water as her mate hovers above. Male dragonflies are highly territorial, they spend a lot of time chasing each other! I tried in vain for over an hour to photograph one of the red dragonflies, this is the only one I got. This pond at the Haw Ridge Greenway in Oak Ridge is alive with dragonflies, damselflies and other aquatic insects. 759
82 <strong>Dragonhunter Dragonfly</strong>
<em>Hagenius brevistylus</em> / Odonata
August 26, 2007

This photo was taken at a distance of about 20 yards with a telephoto lens and has been heavily cropped. Dragonflies can be quite difficult to photogra...

Dragonhunter Dragonfly Hagenius brevistylus / Odonata August 26, 2007 This photo was taken at a distance of about 20 yards with a telephoto lens and has been heavily cropped. Dragonflies can be quite difficult to photogra...

Dragonhunter Dragonfly Hagenius brevistylus / Odonata August 26, 2007 This photo was taken at a distance of about 20 yards with a telephoto lens and has been heavily cropped. Dragonflies can be quite difficult to photograph because they are weary of people and can fly up to 35 miles per hour. I had seen a Dragonhunter at Tremont in the Smokies in the summer of 2006. They are very large and colorful. 988
83 <strong>Gray Petaltail Dragonfly</strong>
<em>Tachopteryx thoreyi</em>

This large gray dragonfly was photographed on the bridge at Tremont.

Gray Petaltail Dragonfly Tachopteryx thoreyi This large gray dragonfly was photographed on the bridge at Tremont.

Gray Petaltail Dragonfly Tachopteryx thoreyi This large gray dragonfly was photographed on the bridge at Tremont. 867
84 <strong>Common Pondhawk</strong>
<em>Erythemis simplicicollis</em>

This beautiful green Dragonfly was seen in Florida. It is a young male Common Pondhawk.

Common Pondhawk Erythemis simplicicollis This beautiful green Dragonfly was seen in Florida. It is a young male Common Pondhawk.

Common Pondhawk Erythemis simplicicollis This beautiful green Dragonfly was seen in Florida. It is a young male Common Pondhawk. 878
85 <strong>Halloween Pennant Dragonfly</strong> - male (a.k.a. Brown-Spotted Yellow-wing)
<em>Celithemis eponina</em> / Odonata
Big Ridge State Park
August 16, 2007
This is a comical little dragonfly, I enjoyed seeing the way it perched on the aquatic...

Halloween Pennant Dragonfly - male (a.k.a. Brown-Spotted Yellow-wing) Celithemis eponina / Odonata Big Ridge State Park August 16, 2007 This is a comical little dragonfly, I enjoyed seeing the way it perched on the aquatic...

Halloween Pennant Dragonfly - male (a.k.a. Brown-Spotted Yellow-wing) Celithemis eponina / Odonata Big Ridge State Park August 16, 2007 This is a comical little dragonfly, I enjoyed seeing the way it perched on the aquatic plants. One of the nice habits of dragonflies is that they are highly territorial and often return to their original perch. I found that if one flew away before I took a photo, if I waited long enough, it would come back. 875
86 <strong>Brown-spotted Yellow-wing Dragonfly</strong> (a.k.a. Halloween Pennant) female
<em>Celithemis eponina</em>
Big Ridge State Park
August 16, 2007
This lovely dragonfly was photographed with a telephoto lens as it rested on a plant. I was surp...

Brown-spotted Yellow-wing Dragonfly (a.k.a. Halloween Pennant) female Celithemis eponina Big Ridge State Park August 16, 2007 This lovely dragonfly was photographed with a telephoto lens as it rested on a plant. I was surp...

Brown-spotted Yellow-wing Dragonfly (a.k.a. Halloween Pennant) female Celithemis eponina Big Ridge State Park August 16, 2007 This lovely dragonfly was photographed with a telephoto lens as it rested on a plant. I was surprised to learn that this is the female of the Halloween Pennant dragonfly, she looks so different than the male. 913
87 <strong>Slaty Skimmer</strong>
<em>Libellula incesta</em>
Ijams Nature Center
August 2, 2007
I photographed this beautiful dark blue Dragonfly at Ijams Nature Center's pond. The black eyes help differentiate this large dragonfly from other blue one...

Slaty Skimmer Libellula incesta Ijams Nature Center August 2, 2007 I photographed this beautiful dark blue Dragonfly at Ijams Nature Center's pond. The black eyes help differentiate this large dragonfly from other blue one...

Slaty Skimmer Libellula incesta Ijams Nature Center August 2, 2007 I photographed this beautiful dark blue Dragonfly at Ijams Nature Center's pond. The black eyes help differentiate this large dragonfly from other blue ones. Ijams is a great place to see frogs, dragonflies and damselflies. 942
88 <strong>Carolina Saddlebags</strong> Dragonfly</strong> - Male  
<em>Tramea carolina</em>
Oak Ridge, TN
June 16, 2008

It took about 1-1/2 hours of standing on the bank of a pond shooting nearly 100 photos with a telephoto lens to finally get this...

Carolina Saddlebags Dragonfly - Male Tramea carolina Oak Ridge, TN June 16, 2008 It took about 1-1/2 hours of standing on the bank of a pond shooting nearly 100 photos with a telephoto lens to finally get this...

Carolina Saddlebags Dragonfly - Male Tramea carolina Oak Ridge, TN June 16, 2008 It took about 1-1/2 hours of standing on the bank of a pond shooting nearly 100 photos with a telephoto lens to finally get this shot. These dragonflies are constantly on the go, even while mating! Most of my pictures of this guy were just a red blur! I was delighted to get this one! 825
89 <strong>Carolina Saddlebags Dragonflies -  </strong> pair
<em>Tramea Carolina</em>
Oak Ridge, TN
June 16, 2008
It is extremely difficult to get a good photo of these dragonflies, they NEVER slow down or stop flying it seems! Since dragonflies can z...

Carolina Saddlebags Dragonflies - pair Tramea Carolina Oak Ridge, TN June 16, 2008 It is extremely difficult to get a good photo of these dragonflies, they NEVER slow down or stop flying it seems! Since dragonflies can z...

Carolina Saddlebags Dragonflies - pair Tramea Carolina Oak Ridge, TN June 16, 2008 It is extremely difficult to get a good photo of these dragonflies, they NEVER slow down or stop flying it seems! Since dragonflies can zip about at up to 35 miles per hour, it can be very difficult to photograph them. I had been following this pair with my telephoto in hopes of getting a shot of them while they were "in tandem". They had just separated when I took this photo; the female is the lower dragonfly. 607
90 <strong>Spangled Skimmer, male </strong>
<em>Libellula cyanea</em>
Oak Ridge, TN
June 16, 2008

Spangled Skimmer, male Libellula cyanea Oak Ridge, TN June 16, 2008

Spangled Skimmer, male Libellula cyanea Oak Ridge, TN June 16, 2008 714
91 <strong>Fragile Forktail Damselfly</strong> - female
<em>Ischnura posita</em> / Odonata

This tiny <strong>Damselfly</strong> landed on a waterlily leaf in the pond at the school where I teach. Damselflies always hold their wings together when they ...

Fragile Forktail Damselfly - female Ischnura posita / Odonata This tiny Damselfly landed on a waterlily leaf in the pond at the school where I teach. Damselflies always hold their wings together when they ...

Fragile Forktail Damselfly - female Ischnura posita / Odonata This tiny Damselfly landed on a waterlily leaf in the pond at the school where I teach. Damselflies always hold their wings together when they land as opposed to dragonflies which can't close their wings. 1053
92 <strong>Blue-fronted Dancer Damselfly</strong> - Male  
<em>Argia apicalis</em>

This blue Damselfly was sitting on a twig, I was happy to be able to get so close to it. The mandibles are clearly visible on the head. According to Jim Bangma, "dancer...

Blue-fronted Dancer Damselfly - Male Argia apicalis This blue Damselfly was sitting on a twig, I was happy to be able to get so close to it. The mandibles are clearly visible on the head. According to Jim Bangma, "dancer...

Blue-fronted Dancer Damselfly - Male Argia apicalis This blue Damselfly was sitting on a twig, I was happy to be able to get so close to it. The mandibles are clearly visible on the head. According to Jim Bangma, "dancers typically perch with the wings folded above the abdomen, unlike Bluets which usually fold the wings along/overlapping the abdomen". This will be a helpful tip in identifying these tiny creatures. 890
93 <strong>Ebony Jewelwing Damselfly</strong> 
<em>Calopteryx maculata</em>

This handsome metallic green male damselfly gave me quite a hard time to get this picture. I was trying out my new camera (in 2004) at the UT Arboretum when I spotted him. He ...

Ebony Jewelwing Damselfly Calopteryx maculata This handsome metallic green male damselfly gave me quite a hard time to get this picture. I was trying out my new camera (in 2004) at the UT Arboretum when I spotted him. He ...

Ebony Jewelwing Damselfly Calopteryx maculata This handsome metallic green male damselfly gave me quite a hard time to get this picture. I was trying out my new camera (in 2004) at the UT Arboretum when I spotted him. He would flit from leaf to leaf as I tried to focus the camera. He gave me a greater appreciation for wildlife photographers! They are actually black, but these beautiful damselflies can look blue, green or black depending on the angle of the sun's light. 1513
94 <strong>Blue-tipped Dancer Damselfly</strong>
(possible)<em>Argia tibialis</em>
Rock Creek State Park, TN

Damselflies "in tandem", the first step before mating. The male grasps the female behind her head before she makes the connection behind his ...

Blue-tipped Dancer Damselfly (possible)Argia tibialis Rock Creek State Park, TN Damselflies "in tandem", the first step before mating. The male grasps the female behind her head before she makes the connection behind his ...

Blue-tipped Dancer Damselfly (possible)Argia tibialis Rock Creek State Park, TN Damselflies "in tandem", the first step before mating. The male grasps the female behind her head before she makes the connection behind his thorax. Damselflies are able to fly in this position. 838
95 I photographed these <strong>Ebony Jewelwing Damselflies</strong> mating (in the "wheel position") while I visited Big Ridge State Park on the hottest day of the year in August 2007. The female has the white spots on her wings.

I photographed these Ebony Jewelwing Damselflies mating (in the "wheel position") while I visited Big Ridge State Park on the hottest day of the year in August 2007. The female has the white spots on her wings.

I photographed these Ebony Jewelwing Damselflies mating (in the "wheel position") while I visited Big Ridge State Park on the hottest day of the year in August 2007. The female has the white spots on her wings. 640
96 <strong>Blue-ringed Damselfly</strong>
(possible)<em>Argia sedula</em>

I was happy to photograph this Damselfly egg-laying her eggs below the water. Her mate is keeping a tight grip on her head to protect her (or actually, his offspring) from other...

Blue-ringed Damselfly (possible)Argia sedula I was happy to photograph this Damselfly egg-laying her eggs below the water. Her mate is keeping a tight grip on her head to protect her (or actually, his offspring) from other...

Blue-ringed Damselfly (possible)Argia sedula I was happy to photograph this Damselfly egg-laying her eggs below the water. Her mate is keeping a tight grip on her head to protect her (or actually, his offspring) from other males. I watched some other females crawl down the plant stems all the way down into the water to lay their eggs. 735
97 Damselfly nymphs are aquatic, they spend up to a year living in lakes, ponds and streams before molting and becoming an adult. The three long appendages at the end of the abdomen are the gills where the nymph breathes.

Damselfly nymphs are aquatic, they spend up to a year living in lakes, ponds and streams before molting and becoming an adult. The three long appendages at the end of the abdomen are the gills where the nymph breathes.

Damselfly nymphs are aquatic, they spend up to a year living in lakes, ponds and streams before molting and becoming an adult. The three long appendages at the end of the abdomen are the gills where the nymph breathes. 849
98 Over the past few years the pine borer beetle has devastated the pine tree population of east Tennessee. Some entire forests have no pine trees left which changes the plant population.

Over the past few years the pine borer beetle has devastated the pine tree population of east Tennessee. Some entire forests have no pine trees left which changes the plant population.

Over the past few years the pine borer beetle has devastated the pine tree population of east Tennessee. Some entire forests have no pine trees left which changes the plant population. 915
99 This is an adult <strong>Dobsonfly</strong>, it had earlier been a nymph called a "hellgramite". The large, aquatic nymph is as scary looking as its name. (See next photo)

This is an adult Dobsonfly, it had earlier been a nymph called a "hellgramite". The large, aquatic nymph is as scary looking as its name. (See next photo)

This is an adult Dobsonfly, it had earlier been a nymph called a "hellgramite". The large, aquatic nymph is as scary looking as its name. (See next photo) 1238
100 This is a <strong>Hellgramite</strong> (Dobsonfly larva)! It is not hard to see that those wicked jaws could deliver quite an unpleasant bite. We found this one in a stream during the AMSE Science Camp.

This is a Hellgramite (Dobsonfly larva)! It is not hard to see that those wicked jaws could deliver quite an unpleasant bite. We found this one in a stream during the AMSE Science Camp.

This is a Hellgramite (Dobsonfly larva)! It is not hard to see that those wicked jaws could deliver quite an unpleasant bite. We found this one in a stream during the AMSE Science Camp. 853
101 I found this large <strong>Female Dobsonfly</strong> (<em>Corydalus</em> spp.)  resting on the outside wall near the entrance of my school. The males have HUGE mandibles (mouthparts), but they are harmless; the less threatening-looking females have a p...

I found this large Female Dobsonfly (Corydalus spp.) resting on the outside wall near the entrance of my school. The males have HUGE mandibles (mouthparts), but they are harmless; the less threatening-looking females have a p...

I found this large Female Dobsonfly (Corydalus spp.) resting on the outside wall near the entrance of my school. The males have HUGE mandibles (mouthparts), but they are harmless; the less threatening-looking females have a painful bite! Don't mess with female insects! Check out her cool-looking antennae! 998
102 Dobsonfly eggcases<br>
These white crusty patches under the 100' Piney River Trail bridge are the eggcases of Dobsonflies. These are large aquatic insects that spend their larval stage in water. The larvae are called "hellgrammites." They have long, s...

Dobsonfly eggcases
These white crusty patches under the 100' Piney River Trail bridge are the eggcases of Dobsonflies. These are large aquatic insects that spend their larval stage in water. The larvae are called "hellgrammites." They have long, s...

Dobsonfly eggcases
These white crusty patches under the 100' Piney River Trail bridge are the eggcases of Dobsonflies. These are large aquatic insects that spend their larval stage in water. The larvae are called "hellgrammites." They have long, sharp mandibles with which they can bite.
913
103 Close-up of Dobsonfly egg cases

Close-up of Dobsonfly egg cases

Close-up of Dobsonfly egg cases 830
104 <strong>Alderfly</strong>
<em>Sialis</em> spp. 
Oak Ridge, TN
May 29, 2008

Alderfly Sialis spp. Oak Ridge, TN May 29, 2008

Alderfly Sialis spp. Oak Ridge, TN May 29, 2008 741
105 <strong>Long-horned Caddisfly </strong>

Gatlinburg, TN (University of Tennessee Field Station)
August 8, 2008

Although Caddisflies are usually found around water, this one was photographed on a light sheet during the Bugguide 2008 Gathering. Cad...

Long-horned Caddisfly Gatlinburg, TN (University of Tennessee Field Station) August 8, 2008 Although Caddisflies are usually found around water, this one was photographed on a light sheet during the Bugguide 2008 Gathering. Cad...

Long-horned Caddisfly Gatlinburg, TN (University of Tennessee Field Station) August 8, 2008 Although Caddisflies are usually found around water, this one was photographed on a light sheet during the Bugguide 2008 Gathering. Caddisflies are aquatic during the first 3 stages of their life. Many of the larvae build elaborate tubes from sticks, small stones, and even snail shells. 786
106 Caddisfly 3-spotted2 copy

Caddisfly 3-spotted2 copy

Caddisfly 3-spotted2 copy 250
107 Caddisfly fuzzy-winged copy

Caddisfly fuzzy-winged copy

Caddisfly fuzzy-winged copy 220
108 Caddisfly4 UTA copy

Caddisfly4 UTA copy

Caddisfly4 UTA copy 224
109 <strong>Caddisfly larva cases</strong> are a challenge to find in streams. The little larvae build cases out of sticks, stones, leaves, or snail shells depending on the species. This one is made of both stones and sticks. If you find one of these cases...

Caddisfly larva cases are a challenge to find in streams. The little larvae build cases out of sticks, stones, leaves, or snail shells depending on the species. This one is made of both stones and sticks. If you find one of these cases...

Caddisfly larva cases are a challenge to find in streams. The little larvae build cases out of sticks, stones, leaves, or snail shells depending on the species. This one is made of both stones and sticks. If you find one of these cases, pick it up and see if it is empty or if it is occupied; the larva will sometimes poke its head out. Just be sure and put it back in the water so it doesn't die! Some people put the larvae in water with semi-precious gemstones to let the larvae make bejewled cases which are used to make earrings and necklaces! 861
110 You really have to know what you are looking for to find a well-camouflaged Caddisfly larva! A little bit of luck doesn't hurt either! I just happened to see a piece of wood moving on the bottom of the stream and realized it wasn't the current moving i...

You really have to know what you are looking for to find a well-camouflaged Caddisfly larva! A little bit of luck doesn't hurt either! I just happened to see a piece of wood moving on the bottom of the stream and realized it wasn't the current moving i...

You really have to know what you are looking for to find a well-camouflaged Caddisfly larva! A little bit of luck doesn't hurt either! I just happened to see a piece of wood moving on the bottom of the stream and realized it wasn't the current moving it. The larva's head is just to the lower left of the light brown, flat piece of wood. If you have trouble finding it, that is what the larva wants! :) 654
111 I found these 3 small Cassisfly cases on a rock in a slow-moving stream in the Smokies. The larvae used small pieces of sand to construct their cases.

I found these 3 small Cassisfly cases on a rock in a slow-moving stream in the Smokies. The larvae used small pieces of sand to construct their cases.

I found these 3 small Cassisfly cases on a rock in a slow-moving stream in the Smokies. The larvae used small pieces of sand to construct their cases. 631
112 <strong>Hangingfly</strong>
<em>Bittacus</em> sp. / order: Mecoptera
Oak Ridge, TN
June 2008

I photographed this insect through a petri dish at science camp. Some insects just don't like to pose for pictures, so I have to "help" them out a bit! :...

Hangingfly Bittacus sp. / order: Mecoptera Oak Ridge, TN June 2008 I photographed this insect through a petri dish at science camp. Some insects just don't like to pose for pictures, so I have to "help" them out a bit! :...

Hangingfly Bittacus sp. / order: Mecoptera Oak Ridge, TN June 2008 I photographed this insect through a petri dish at science camp. Some insects just don't like to pose for pictures, so I have to "help" them out a bit! :)Although it looks a lot like a cranefly, take note that it has 4 wings, so it isn't a fly at all. 749
113 <strong>Variable Dancer Damselfly</strong> - male
<em>Argia fumipennis</em>
Knoxville, TN (Ijams Nature Center)
May 31, 2010

This purple damselfly landed on a chunk of Tennessee Pink marble near the entrance of the abandoned Mead's Quarry at Ijam...

Variable Dancer Damselfly - male Argia fumipennis Knoxville, TN (Ijams Nature Center) May 31, 2010 This purple damselfly landed on a chunk of Tennessee Pink marble near the entrance of the abandoned Mead's Quarry at Ijam...

Variable Dancer Damselfly - male Argia fumipennis Knoxville, TN (Ijams Nature Center) May 31, 2010 This purple damselfly landed on a chunk of Tennessee Pink marble near the entrance of the abandoned Mead's Quarry at Ijams Nature Center. The park has a hiking trail that goes up and around the quarry. 575
114 <strong>Mantidfly</strong> <i>Dicromantispa sayi</i> 6-10-10

Mantidfly Dicromantispa sayi 6-10-10

Mantidfly Dicromantispa sayi 6-10-10 These funny little insects look amazingly like a small Praying Mantis. Their front legs are used for capturing prey. 602
115 <strong>Hangingfly</strong>
<em>Bittacus strigosus</em> / Order: Mecoptera
Oak Ridge, TN
7-1-10

Hangingfly Bittacus strigosus / Order: Mecoptera Oak Ridge, TN 7-1-10

Hangingfly Bittacus strigosus / Order: Mecoptera Oak Ridge, TN 7-1-10 637
116 Robber fly Horse fly copy

Robber fly Horse fly copy

Robber fly Horse fly copy 453

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