Mammals

This album contains Mammals from the east Tennessee area and other states
Image Number Image (Click to Enlarge)CaptionImage Viewed
1 <strong>Raccoon</strong>
<em>Procyon lotor</em>
Clinton, TN
August 23, 2008

Gordon, a former school colleague, took Kenny and me to the home of one of his friends in hopes of seeing some raccoons. His friends feed them, so they come to the patio ...

Raccoon Procyon lotor Clinton, TN August 23, 2008 Gordon, a former school colleague, took Kenny and me to the home of one of his friends in hopes of seeing some raccoons. His friends feed them, so they come to the patio ...

Raccoon Procyon lotor Clinton, TN August 23, 2008 Gordon, a former school colleague, took Kenny and me to the home of one of his friends in hopes of seeing some raccoons. His friends feed them, so they come to the patio every night. No, I don't condone feeing wild animals, but I figured if they were going to be within easy range, I'd take advantage of it! Raccoons are omnivores, they will eat both plants and animals (and cold leftover pizza!). Normally they eat insects, crawfish, bird eggs, small mammals, berries, etc. The raccoon is Tennessee's State Animal, so I will put it first on this gallery! Surprisingly, the flash from my camera didn't bother her, but if I moved very much she would run off. Raccoons should never be touched, they can inflict nasty bites and scratches. They can also carry rabies. 2194
2 Raccoon 

This raccoon was trying to get into my garbage can next to the house. I tried to scare her away, but she didn't want to leave the patio.

Raccoon This raccoon was trying to get into my garbage can next to the house. I tried to scare her away, but she didn't want to leave the patio.

Raccoon This raccoon was trying to get into my garbage can next to the house. I tried to scare her away, but she didn't want to leave the patio. 1658
3 No, this Raccoon is not possessed by some evil woodland spirit! The light from the  forward facing flash on my camera reflected off the back of her eyes. Being a nocturnal animal, raccoons have large eyes with many rods for taking in light in dim condi...

No, this Raccoon is not possessed by some evil woodland spirit! The light from the forward facing flash on my camera reflected off the back of her eyes. Being a nocturnal animal, raccoons have large eyes with many rods for taking in light in dim condi...

No, this Raccoon is not possessed by some evil woodland spirit! The light from the forward facing flash on my camera reflected off the back of her eyes. Being a nocturnal animal, raccoons have large eyes with many rods for taking in light in dim conditions. Too bad Photoshop doesn't have a "white eye reduction" feature like it does for red eye in people! 3868
4 <strong>Raccoon and Frog Tracks</strong><br>
I enjoy "reading" tracks in the snow and mud. It is interesting to try to figure out the actions and interactions of animals. Unfortunately, it appears the frog met with an unhappy ending in this case!

Raccoon and Frog Tracks
I enjoy "reading" tracks in the snow and mud. It is interesting to try to figure out the actions and interactions of animals. Unfortunately, it appears the frog met with an unhappy ending in this case!

Raccoon and Frog Tracks
I enjoy "reading" tracks in the snow and mud. It is interesting to try to figure out the actions and interactions of animals. Unfortunately, it appears the frog met with an unhappy ending in this case!
2707
5 <b>Striped Skunk</b>
<em>Mephitis mephitis</em>
Oak Ridge, TN

I was so excited to finally get a photo of a skunk! A friend called me and said he had one that came into his yard each evening, so I was able to snap a few shots before this guy ambled...

Striped Skunk Mephitis mephitis Oak Ridge, TN I was so excited to finally get a photo of a skunk! A friend called me and said he had one that came into his yard each evening, so I was able to snap a few shots before this guy ambled...

Striped Skunk Mephitis mephitis Oak Ridge, TN I was so excited to finally get a photo of a skunk! A friend called me and said he had one that came into his yard each evening, so I was able to snap a few shots before this guy ambled off into the woods. Skunks are beautiful animals and they are very inquisitive. They are omnivores and eat a variety of foods. Often they leave signs of their nocturnal hunting when they dig for grubs in the grass. 1724
6 Buck in Velvet at Cades Cove<br>
<strong>White-tailed Deer</strong> (<em>Odocoileus virginianus </em>) are quite numerous in Cades Cove in the Smoky Mountains. This young buck had medium-sized antlers in "velvet" in July; he should be quite a handsome...

Buck in Velvet at Cades Cove
White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus ) are quite numerous in Cades Cove in the Smoky Mountains. This young buck had medium-sized antlers in "velvet" in July; he should be quite a handsome...

Buck in Velvet at Cades Cove
White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus ) are quite numerous in Cades Cove in the Smoky Mountains. This young buck had medium-sized antlers in "velvet" in July; he should be quite a handsome deer by fall. The Smokies are also the home of recently introduced elk on the North Carolina side of the park.
3367
7 As my friend Amber, from Tremont, and I drove through Cades Cove, we saw this buck just a few feet from the car. It is easy to see the velvet on this 8-pointer's antlers. His antlers are still growing at this stage, the velvet is a layer of blood vesse...

As my friend Amber, from Tremont, and I drove through Cades Cove, we saw this buck just a few feet from the car. It is easy to see the velvet on this 8-pointer's antlers. His antlers are still growing at this stage, the velvet is a layer of blood vesse...

As my friend Amber, from Tremont, and I drove through Cades Cove, we saw this buck just a few feet from the car. It is easy to see the velvet on this 8-pointer's antlers. His antlers are still growing at this stage, the velvet is a layer of blood vessel-rich skin that feeds the underlying bone. Later in the fall the velvet dries up and sloughs off. Bucks rub their antlers on low branches to rub off the dead skin (this also gets them aroused to begin the rut). 2123
8 <strong>Deer Skull</strong>

This buck died in the prime of his life in the fall. He was a healthy specimen as can be determined by his large, multi-pronged rack (antlers) and his teeth. Male deer, elk, and moose have antlers made of bone. They shed ...

Deer Skull This buck died in the prime of his life in the fall. He was a healthy specimen as can be determined by his large, multi-pronged rack (antlers) and his teeth. Male deer, elk, and moose have antlers made of bone. They shed ...

Deer Skull This buck died in the prime of his life in the fall. He was a healthy specimen as can be determined by his large, multi-pronged rack (antlers) and his teeth. Male deer, elk, and moose have antlers made of bone. They shed the antlers in the late fall and grow new ones the following spring. This is a skull that I use in my science outreach programs, it was given to us by a TN Wildlife Resources Agency agent. 4785
9 Doe with Flame Azaleas on Gregory's Bald

Doe with Flame Azaleas on Gregory's Bald

Doe with Flame Azaleas on Gregory's Bald 1567
10 Newborn Fawn

Newborn Fawn

Newborn Fawn 1587
11 This White-tail Deer Fawn has ears like satellite dishes! The ears can move independently to help the deer determine where a sound is coming from.

This White-tail Deer Fawn has ears like satellite dishes! The ears can move independently to help the deer determine where a sound is coming from.

This White-tail Deer Fawn has ears like satellite dishes! The ears can move independently to help the deer determine where a sound is coming from. 3229
12 We saw this pretty doe and her spotted fawn in the woods at Norris Dam State Park in early August 2007. They were quite tame, but I took this photo from the car to try to keep from spooking them.

We saw this pretty doe and her spotted fawn in the woods at Norris Dam State Park in early August 2007. They were quite tame, but I took this photo from the car to try to keep from spooking them.

We saw this pretty doe and her spotted fawn in the woods at Norris Dam State Park in early August 2007. They were quite tame, but I took this photo from the car to try to keep from spooking them. 1960
13 There are 3 Deer in this photo, they are very well camouflaged. Can you spot all of them?  I didn't notice them until one of them stepped on a stick and I heard it crack. I wonder how long they had been watching me? :) 
Hint: If you didn't see all thr...

There are 3 Deer in this photo, they are very well camouflaged. Can you spot all of them? I didn't notice them until one of them stepped on a stick and I heard it crack. I wonder how long they had been watching me? :) Hint: If you didn't see all thr...

There are 3 Deer in this photo, they are very well camouflaged. Can you spot all of them? I didn't notice them until one of them stepped on a stick and I heard it crack. I wonder how long they had been watching me? :) Hint: If you didn't see all three, look for the black tail of the deer with its rump facing the camera. 2371
14 <strong>Elk</strong>
<em>Cervus canadensis</em>
Great Smoky Mountains National Park
October 8, 2009

Elk were reintroduced into Tennessee after being hunted into extinction nearly 150 years ago. By autumn the large males (bulls) sport huge antlers...

Elk Cervus canadensis Great Smoky Mountains National Park October 8, 2009 Elk were reintroduced into Tennessee after being hunted into extinction nearly 150 years ago. By autumn the large males (bulls) sport huge antlers...

Elk Cervus canadensis Great Smoky Mountains National Park October 8, 2009 Elk were reintroduced into Tennessee after being hunted into extinction nearly 150 years ago. By autumn the large males (bulls) sport huge antlers (which can grow up to 1" per day!), they will lose them in March. Elk are herbivores, they eat grass, low-growing plants, twigs and tree bark. Like deer, cattle, and goats, they are ruminant animals with a four-chambered stomach. In September through mid-October the males establish a "harem" of cows and their calves. They aggressively defend them from rival males through "bugling" (a shrill, high-pitched call that can be heard up to a mile) and by intimidating them with their large display of antlers. A full-grown bull can weigh up to 700 pounds and stand 5 feet tall at the shoulder. Cows average 500 pounds and although they do not have antlers, they will protect their calves. Elk should never be approached! 1561
15 Elk were native in Tennessee until they were hunted to extinction in the 1800's. In 2001 the National Park Service and the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) reintroduced these magnificent animals back into the state. We saw Elk No.2 in the Cat...

Elk were native in Tennessee until they were hunted to extinction in the 1800's. In 2001 the National Park Service and the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) reintroduced these magnificent animals back into the state. We saw Elk No.2 in the Cat...

Elk were native in Tennessee until they were hunted to extinction in the 1800's. In 2001 the National Park Service and the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) reintroduced these magnificent animals back into the state. We saw Elk No.2 in the Cataloochee Cove section of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. This fellow was one of the first group to be released. His ear tags and radio collar are easy to see in this photo. Unfortunately, he had been injured, so he was not moving around very much. We learned that he was to be treated by park biologists later that evening. 1810
16 In September through mid-October the elk go through the "rut," their mating season. A bull will claim a harem of cows and calves as his for breeding, he aggressively defends them from rival males. It is amazing to hear them bugle, a loud, shrill sound ...

In September through mid-October the elk go through the "rut," their mating season. A bull will claim a harem of cows and calves as his for breeding, he aggressively defends them from rival males. It is amazing to hear them bugle, a loud, shrill sound ...

In September through mid-October the elk go through the "rut," their mating season. A bull will claim a harem of cows and calves as his for breeding, he aggressively defends them from rival males. It is amazing to hear them bugle, a loud, shrill sound that attracts females and alerts other bulls of their presence. Elk spotters are reminded by signs and rangers to keep their distance from the elk, preferably near a vehicle in case the "testosterone-charged" bulls decide to take out their aggression on the spectators! We saw this bull chase away some younger, "spike" bulls. According to the rangers, this bull had just taken over the herd at the beginning of October, so he probably missed out on his chance to breed. 1619
17 This elk bull, cow and calf was photographed at Cataloochee Cove in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

This elk bull, cow and calf was photographed at Cataloochee Cove in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

This elk bull, cow and calf was photographed at Cataloochee Cove in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. 1716
18 I photographed this elk cow nursing her calf in the Smokies in Cataloochee.

I photographed this elk cow nursing her calf in the Smokies in Cataloochee.

I photographed this elk cow nursing her calf in the Smokies in Cataloochee. 1736
19 <strong>Black Bear </strong>
<em>Ursus americanus</em>
Great Smoky Mountains National Park
August 2009

We came across this bear while hiking on the Grotto Falls trail in the Smokies. It tore open a decayed log looking for grubs, termites, and ant...

Black Bear Ursus americanus Great Smoky Mountains National Park August 2009 We came across this bear while hiking on the Grotto Falls trail in the Smokies. It tore open a decayed log looking for grubs, termites, and ant...

Black Bear Ursus americanus Great Smoky Mountains National Park August 2009 We came across this bear while hiking on the Grotto Falls trail in the Smokies. It tore open a decayed log looking for grubs, termites, and ants. Bears are omnivores, they will eat a variety of foods. One food the rangers don't want them eating is human food, which they may get from picnic areas, campgrounds or garbage cans. There is a saying, "A fed bear is a dead bear," if they become habituated to human food, they become dangerous. 1624
20 <b>Bear cubs in tree</b>

Bear cubs in tree

Bear cubs in tree The fall of 2011 was a great time to see bears in the Smokies. A good mast crop (acorns and other nuts) had the bears foraging for food before they bedded down for the winter. We enjoyed seeing these two cubs napping in an oak tree after munching on acorns. 1352
21 <b>Bear sow</b>

Bear sow

Bear sow This mother bear was waiting for her cubs to join her. They were still grabbing acorns in the top of a large oak tree in Cades Cove in the Smokies. 1298
22 The most sought-after animal for visitors in the Smokies is the <strong>Black Bear</strong> (<em>Ursus americanus</em>). While driving through Cades Cove in July 2005 Amber and I saw this bear ambling along the road. Black bears may look cute and cuddl...

The most sought-after animal for visitors in the Smokies is the Black Bear (Ursus americanus). While driving through Cades Cove in July 2005 Amber and I saw this bear ambling along the road. Black bears may look cute and cuddl...

The most sought-after animal for visitors in the Smokies is the Black Bear (Ursus americanus). While driving through Cades Cove in July 2005 Amber and I saw this bear ambling along the road. Black bears may look cute and cuddly, but they must be treated with respect, they can be dangerous. This photo was taken from the car. 1876
23 A large number of cars stopped along Cades Cove road was an indication of something interesting. Amber and I were delayed by a traffic jam while we were on an orchid search. She was a bit annoyed because she works in the park and is accustomed to seein...

A large number of cars stopped along Cades Cove road was an indication of something interesting. Amber and I were delayed by a traffic jam while we were on an orchid search. She was a bit annoyed because she works in the park and is accustomed to seein...

A large number of cars stopped along Cades Cove road was an indication of something interesting. Amber and I were delayed by a traffic jam while we were on an orchid search. She was a bit annoyed because she works in the park and is accustomed to seeing deer, bears, and other animals. However, she got excited too when these three bear cubs ran across a clearing in Cades Cove! I know this isn't a great photo, but I never claimed to be a wildlife photographer! I really need to get a digital SLR with a good telephoto lens! :) 1905
24 <strong>Gray Squirrel</strong>
<em>Sciurus carolinensis</em>

I photographed this little guy eating unripe Black Gum fruits in the tree just outside my livingroom window. Birds help trees by swallowing fruits whole and then passing the seeds undamag...

Gray Squirrel Sciurus carolinensis I photographed this little guy eating unripe Black Gum fruits in the tree just outside my livingroom window. Birds help trees by swallowing fruits whole and then passing the seeds undamag...

Gray Squirrel Sciurus carolinensis I photographed this little guy eating unripe Black Gum fruits in the tree just outside my livingroom window. Birds help trees by swallowing fruits whole and then passing the seeds undamaged, squirrels eat all parts of the fruit. The next time you are in the woods in the fall, practice your tracking skills and see if you can find signs of where squirrels have eaten fruits or nuts. It's not hard to do, they are messy eaters! Squirrels are not picky eaters, they will eat not only nuts and acorns, but also fungi, insects, bird eggs, and sometimes even baby birds. They are rodents, like rats, mice,and beavers. Their long incisors never stop growing and must be kept worn down, this is why they can gnaw through acorn and hickory nut shells. My parents were preturbed to find that the squirrels in their yard had gnawed through the aluminum wires that held their chainlink fence to the top bar! A squirrel's tail may look thick, but it is actually thinner than a pencil. The tail protects the squirrel in the rain and it acts as a rudder when it jumps from branch to branch (or your roof). It is interesting to see the way a squirrel chatters and twitches its tail when it is upset by the presence of a dog, cat, or even a person. 2272
25 Gray Squirrel

Gray Squirrel

Gray Squirrel 1580
26 <b>Red Squirrel</b> <i>Tamiasciurus hudsonicus</i>

Red Squirrel Tamiasciurus hudsonicus

Red Squirrel Tamiasciurus hudsonicus Great Smoky Mountains NP April 2011 This active little guy was scurrying around the area below Ramsay Cascade in the Smokies. It was begging for handouts, but it didn't have any luck with us! It is against the law to feed animals in the national park, and besides, human food simply isn't good for them! Red squirrels are smaller than Gray Squirrels and they have a reddish color to their fur. In the summer they may have a black stripe. 1318
27 <strong>Red Squirrel</strong><em>Tamiasciurus hudsonicus</em>Great Smoky Mountains NPSept. 16, 2007This active little guy was scurrying around the area below Rainbow Falls. These squirrels are smaller than Gray Squirrels and they have a reddish...

Red SquirrelTamiasciurus hudsonicusGreat Smoky Mountains NPSept. 16, 2007This active little guy was scurrying around the area below Rainbow Falls. These squirrels are smaller than Gray Squirrels and they have a reddish...

Red Squirrel Tamiasciurus hudsonicus Great Smoky Mountains NP Sept. 16, 2007 This active little guy was scurrying around the area below Ramsay Cascade in the Smokies. It was begging for handouts, but it didn't have any luck with us! It is against the law to feed animals in the national park, and besides, human food simply isn't good for them! Red squirrels are smaller than Gray Squirrels and they have a reddish color to their fur. In the summer they may have a black stripe. 1702
28 <strong>Southern Flying Squirrel</strong>
<em>Glaucomys volans</em>
Milton, FL
August 30, 2008

I would much rather photograph animals in their natural environment, but in cases like this little critter, it would be nearly impossible. Photographin...

Southern Flying Squirrel Glaucomys volans Milton, FL August 30, 2008 I would much rather photograph animals in their natural environment, but in cases like this little critter, it would be nearly impossible. Photographin...

Southern Flying Squirrel Glaucomys volans Milton, FL August 30, 2008 I would much rather photograph animals in their natural environment, but in cases like this little critter, it would be nearly impossible. Photographing these nocturnal animals would involve strobe lights and a motion sensor to catch them in flight, which are a bit out of my price range! When one of my parents' neighbors mentioned that she had two flying squirrels that she was rehabilitating, I jumped at the chance to get a photo. She called at 9:00 p.m. when they came out of their box into their cage and we went down to see them. The flying membrane (called the patagium) is the white area between the front and hind legs, it stays "folded up" until the squirrel opens it out to glide from tree to tree. The wide, bushy tail is used like a rudder for maneuvering during a glide. These cute little rodents can become a problem for homeowners if they take up residence in their attic! 2463
29 <strong>Eastern Chipmunk</strong>
<em>Tamias striatus</em>
Chipmunks are perky little rodents with "racing stripes"! I was happy to find one sitting still long enough to get a photo of it! The stripes on its sides are a form of camouflage. Like many ...

Eastern Chipmunk Tamias striatus Chipmunks are perky little rodents with "racing stripes"! I was happy to find one sitting still long enough to get a photo of it! The stripes on its sides are a form of camouflage. Like many ...

Eastern Chipmunk Tamias striatus Chipmunks are perky little rodents with "racing stripes"! I was happy to find one sitting still long enough to get a photo of it! The stripes on its sides are a form of camouflage. Like many of the other wild animals at Bays Mountain Park in Kingsport, it was unafraid of people. Unfortunately, when people feed animals they lose their fear and often expect handouts. Feeding wild animals, no matter how small, cute and cuddly they may be, is dangerous for the "feeder" and the "feedee". It is unhealty for the animal to eat human food. Many rodents store food for the winter in their dens. If they take junk food, like potato chips or cheese puffs, back to the den it will rot, then when the animal needs it during the winter there is no food to eat. Feeding wild animals will eventually kill them! Some larger animals will expect to be fed and may become aggressive. Bears become a problem if they are fed, often they must be relocated (or worse!). Park Rangers say, "A fed bear is a dead bear." In some parts of the country small rodents can can transmit the Hanta virus and the Bubonic plague. 2246
30 <strong>White-footed Mouse</strong>
<em>Peromyscus leucopus</em>
Oak Ridge, TN
May 14, 2009

I found this little guy in the storage cabinet in the old cabin where we teach our outdoor classes. To be so cute, White-footed mice can sure be messy! Th...

White-footed Mouse Peromyscus leucopus Oak Ridge, TN May 14, 2009 I found this little guy in the storage cabinet in the old cabin where we teach our outdoor classes. To be so cute, White-footed mice can sure be messy! Th...

White-footed Mouse Peromyscus leucopus Oak Ridge, TN May 14, 2009 I found this little guy in the storage cabinet in the old cabin where we teach our outdoor classes. To be so cute, White-footed mice can sure be messy! They love to shred paper, tissues, and anything else they can use as nesting material. It is amazing to see what tiny openings they can get through! 2337
31 This large <strong>Groundhog (a.k.a. Woodchuck)</strong> (<em>Marmota monax</em>) was nibbling violet leaves in my back yard. I took this photo from the picture window in my living room. These rodents chow down all summer long to put on a thick layer o...

This large Groundhog (a.k.a. Woodchuck) (Marmota monax) was nibbling violet leaves in my back yard. I took this photo from the picture window in my living room. These rodents chow down all summer long to put on a thick layer o...

This large Groundhog (a.k.a. Woodchuck) (Marmota monax) was nibbling violet leaves in my back yard. I took this photo from the picture window in my living room. These rodents chow down all summer long to put on a thick layer of fat so they can spend the winter underground. Note to folks in the western U.S. --- this is not a gopher! :) 4285
32 I photographed this Groundhog eating in the lot behind our house. Groundhogs are rodents (like mice, rats, and squirrels), their incisors never stop growing. They nip off plants with their long incisors and then grind the food with their flat, ridged m...

I photographed this Groundhog eating in the lot behind our house. Groundhogs are rodents (like mice, rats, and squirrels), their incisors never stop growing. They nip off plants with their long incisors and then grind the food with their flat, ridged m...

I photographed this Groundhog eating in the lot behind our house. Groundhogs are rodents (like mice, rats, and squirrels), their incisors never stop growing. They nip off plants with their long incisors and then grind the food with their flat, ridged molars. 2467
33 This Groundhog came out of its' den a day early, on Feb. 1, 2007, to see the rare snowfall! It is probably the same animal in the previous photo. I took advantage of one of the first school snow days we've had in a long time to take some photos! Yes, t...

This Groundhog came out of its' den a day early, on Feb. 1, 2007, to see the rare snowfall! It is probably the same animal in the previous photo. I took advantage of one of the first school snow days we've had in a long time to take some photos! Yes, t...

This Groundhog came out of its' den a day early, on Feb. 1, 2007, to see the rare snowfall! It is probably the same animal in the previous photo. I took advantage of one of the first school snow days we've had in a long time to take some photos! Yes, this little bit of snow got us a day off, there was more than this earlier in the day! 1899
34 If I hadn't seen this with my own eyes, I wouldn't have believed it! The Groundhog must have been really hungry from spending a couple of months underground; it climbed up this wild cherry tree in the backyard and nibbled the bark! I never knew groundh...

If I hadn't seen this with my own eyes, I wouldn't have believed it! The Groundhog must have been really hungry from spending a couple of months underground; it climbed up this wild cherry tree in the backyard and nibbled the bark! I never knew groundh...

If I hadn't seen this with my own eyes, I wouldn't have believed it! The Groundhog must have been really hungry from spending a couple of months underground; it climbed up this wild cherry tree in the backyard and nibbled the bark! I never knew groundhogs could climb trees! This photo was taken through my living room window. 2880
35 <strong>Muskrat</strong>
<em>Ondatra zibethicus</em>
I snapped this photo of a Muskrat swimming in the Duck Pond at Fountain City. Unfortunately, I had to take it quickly with my little pocket camera, so the photo is a bit blurry. I didn't have room ...

Muskrat Ondatra zibethicus I snapped this photo of a Muskrat swimming in the Duck Pond at Fountain City. Unfortunately, I had to take it quickly with my little pocket camera, so the photo is a bit blurry. I didn't have room ...

Muskrat Ondatra zibethicus I snapped this photo of a Muskrat swimming in the Duck Pond at Fountain City. Unfortunately, I had to take it quickly with my little pocket camera, so the photo is a bit blurry. I didn't have room in my trunk to bring my good camera. The muskrat was diving for pieces of bread the ducks and geese didn't eat! Normally, they eat plants. It is common to see muskrat holes near lake and stream banks. 2612
36 This model Muskrat Skull shows the huge incisors that all rodents have. Rodents don't normally eat meat, so they have no canine teeth (rats do sometimes eat meat).

This model Muskrat Skull shows the huge incisors that all rodents have. Rodents don't normally eat meat, so they have no canine teeth (rats do sometimes eat meat).

This model Muskrat Skull shows the huge incisors that all rodents have. Rodents don't normally eat meat, so they have no canine teeth (rats do sometimes eat meat). 2351
37 This <strong>North American Porcupine - </strong> (<em>Erethizon dorsatum)</em> was seen at Snowbird Ski Resort in Utah in December 2004. I know it isn't from Tennessee, but it was so interesting I wanted to share it on this section. Porcupines are rod...

This North American Porcupine - (Erethizon dorsatum) was seen at Snowbird Ski Resort in Utah in December 2004. I know it isn't from Tennessee, but it was so interesting I wanted to share it on this section. Porcupines are rod...

This North American Porcupine - (Erethizon dorsatum) was seen at Snowbird Ski Resort in Utah in December 2004. I know it isn't from Tennessee, but it was so interesting I wanted to share it on this section. Porcupines are rodents, like squirrels, mice, and rats. It was easy to see where they had been eating, there were small pieces of spruce (or Fir?) twigs on the ground below the tree (they are messy eaters!). The porcupine's fur was interesting, I was really surprised to see the long yellow hairs that stuck out wildly among the more dense brown fur. The famous quills were barely visible. The yellow hairs may be for camoflage in the dry plants. At night they would come out of the trees to feed on the dry grass near the heated sidewalks. 3002
38 A beaver-eaten tree on the Bluff Trail at Norris Dam State Park. Beavers eat the bark, not the wood. Their gnawing can be fatal to the tree if they girdle the tree by eating through the bark all the way around the trunk. The tree will starve to death w...

A beaver-eaten tree on the Bluff Trail at Norris Dam State Park. Beavers eat the bark, not the wood. Their gnawing can be fatal to the tree if they girdle the tree by eating through the bark all the way around the trunk. The tree will starve to death w...

A beaver-eaten tree on the Bluff Trail at Norris Dam State Park. Beavers eat the bark, not the wood. Their gnawing can be fatal to the tree if they girdle the tree by eating through the bark all the way around the trunk. The tree will starve to death when it loses its' phloem layer which transports the sap. 2221
39 <strong>Eastern Cottontail Rabbit</strong> 
<em>Sylvilagus floridanus</em>
I photographed this little guy (or gal) from my living room window. It is easy to see how this rabbit got its common name. Rabbits are <u>not</u> rodents, they are <em>lagomor...

Eastern Cottontail Rabbit Sylvilagus floridanus I photographed this little guy (or gal) from my living room window. It is easy to see how this rabbit got its common name. Rabbits are not rodents, they are lagomor...

Eastern Cottontail Rabbit Sylvilagus floridanus I photographed this little guy (or gal) from my living room window. It is easy to see how this rabbit got its common name. Rabbits are not rodents, they are lagomorphs, meaning "hare-form"; they have double incisors. 2140
40 <b>Appalachian Cottontail</b>  <i>Sylvilagus obscurus</i>

Appalachian Cottontail Sylvilagus obscurus

Appalachian Cottontail Sylvilagus obscurus I enjoyed watching this Appalachian Cottontail rabbit on Gregory Bald in the Smokies. It was surprisingly unafraid of people, it was less than 10 feet away from me and just munched the grass contentedly. The uncommon Appalachian cottontails have a diffuse gray cheek patch, eastern cottontail rabbits do not. Rabbits are prey animals, one of the adaptations they have is movable ears. The ears move independently to pick up on sounds made by predators. Another adaptation is the side-set eyes; prey animals have their eyes on the side of their head for a wide angle of view. Meat-eating animals, like dogs, cats, owls (and humans!) have their eyes on the front of their heads for better depth of field. 3519
41 <strong>Little Brown Bat</strong>
<em>Myotis lucifugus</em>

This is one of the preserved Bats that I use in my outreach classes. I held it up so I could show a "see-through" view of the wing and leg bones. Bats have the same kinds of bones that hum...

Little Brown Bat Myotis lucifugus This is one of the preserved Bats that I use in my outreach classes. I held it up so I could show a "see-through" view of the wing and leg bones. Bats have the same kinds of bones that hum...

Little Brown Bat Myotis lucifugus This is one of the preserved Bats that I use in my outreach classes. I held it up so I could show a "see-through" view of the wing and leg bones. Bats have the same kinds of bones that humans have in their arms, hands and legs, they are just proportioned a lot differently. Bats are NOT rodents, they are in the order Chiroptera, meaning "hand winged". The humerus (upper arm) bone is about half the length of the ulna and radius (lower arm bones), the thumb is the small hook at the upper bend in the wing and the other 4 fingers are the long, thin bones in the flying part of the wings. A bat's wing membrane is extremely thin and can be damaged if people throw rocks or shoot BBs at them. Bats are extremely beneficial, they can eat thousands of insects in a night. They use their large ears to pick up the reflected sounds they make, called echolocation. That is why bats often have such an erratic flight pattern, because they fly to the insects they detect in the air. 2225
42 <strong>Shrew</strong>

I found this dead shrew while hiking at Haw Ridge. These tiny animals are voracious eaters for their size. To help them subdue their prey easier, their saliva is venomous. They eat insects and earthworms.

Shrew I found this dead shrew while hiking at Haw Ridge. These tiny animals are voracious eaters for their size. To help them subdue their prey easier, their saliva is venomous. They eat insects and earthworms.

Shrew I found this dead shrew while hiking at Haw Ridge. These tiny animals are voracious eaters for their size. To help them subdue their prey easier, their saliva is venomous. They eat insects and earthworms. 1936
43 <strong>North American Least Shrew</strong> - dead
<em>Cryptotis parva</em>

North American Least Shrew - dead Cryptotis parva

North American Least Shrew - dead Cryptotis parva 2208
44 Close-up of a Shrew's teeth

Shrews have "red" teeth due to iron deposits on the outer layer.

Close-up of a Shrew's teeth Shrews have "red" teeth due to iron deposits on the outer layer.

Close-up of a Shrew's teeth Shrews have "red" teeth due to iron deposits on the outer layer. 2670
45 This <strong>Opossum (a.k.a Possum)</strong> (<em>Didelphis virginiana</em>)  belongs to Marcella, one of my environmental education colleagues, a wildlife rehabilitator. She brought her to our summer science camp to show the kids. It is amazing to wat...

This Opossum (a.k.a Possum) (Didelphis virginiana) belongs to Marcella, one of my environmental education colleagues, a wildlife rehabilitator. She brought her to our summer science camp to show the kids. It is amazing to wat...

This Opossum (a.k.a Possum) (Didelphis virginiana) belongs to Marcella, one of my environmental education colleagues, a wildlife rehabilitator. She brought her to our summer science camp to show the kids. It is amazing to watch her eat a grape, she peels it in her mouth and then spits out the skin and the seeds! Opossums have 52 teeth, they are omnivores that will eat many different foods. Many dead opossums are seen along the roadsides is because of human trash, another reason not to litter! Note the wide-spread toes on the front feet, the hind feet have a thumb-like inside toe. It is very easy to identify opossum tracks. Although opossums have a "prehensile" tail, they can use it to hang by only when they are small. These strange creatures date back to the time of the dinosaurs in the Cretaceous period. They are the only marsupials found in North American. The baby opossums are born hairless and extrememly tiny, they crawl up to the mother's pouch, begin to nurse and then remain there until they are large enough exit. (see next photo) Mother opossums often carry larger babies on their back. 2364
46 I photographed these Opossum tracks in the mud at Haw Ridge, in Oak Ridge. The top print is the front, right foot; the lower print is the rear, right foot.

I photographed these Opossum tracks in the mud at Haw Ridge, in Oak Ridge. The top print is the front, right foot; the lower print is the rear, right foot.

I photographed these Opossum tracks in the mud at Haw Ridge, in Oak Ridge. The top print is the front, right foot; the lower print is the rear, right foot. 2365
47 I rescued this baby opossum from the jaws of our neighbor's cat in 2003. It was "playing possum" when I found it as I was taking out the compost. Its' mouth was agape and it was motionless, it really did look like it was dead! After shooing the cat awa...

I rescued this baby opossum from the jaws of our neighbor's cat in 2003. It was "playing possum" when I found it as I was taking out the compost. Its' mouth was agape and it was motionless, it really did look like it was dead! After shooing the cat awa...

I rescued this baby opossum from the jaws of our neighbor's cat in 2003. It was "playing possum" when I found it as I was taking out the compost. Its' mouth was agape and it was motionless, it really did look like it was dead! After shooing the cat away I put the possum in the empty compost bin and brought it into the house. After a few minutes it began to rally, so I put it in the deeper recycle bin with a towel. We couldn't resist holding the little guy for a while when it "came to". Opossums do not carry rabies, so we knew it would not be dangerous to pick it up. We enjoyed our short visit with this adorable little creature. The next day I took it to a wildlife rehabilitator at a local veterinarian's office. It is against the law to keep wild animals as pets in Tennessee. 2944
48 This model of a Skunk Skull shows the different teeth that an <em>omnivore</em> has. The small <u>incisors</u> in the front are used for nipping off small pieces of meat, the long <u>canines</u> (fangs) are used to rip and tear larger pieces of meat, t...

This model of a Skunk Skull shows the different teeth that an omnivore has. The small incisors in the front are used for nipping off small pieces of meat, the long canines (fangs) are used to rip and tear larger pieces of meat, t...

This model of a Skunk Skull shows the different teeth that an omnivore has. The small incisors in the front are used for nipping off small pieces of meat, the long canines (fangs) are used to rip and tear larger pieces of meat, the small molars are used to grind plant material and the larger molars are used to crush meat and bones. The forward-looking eyes give the skunk good depth perception for hunting food. 3621
49 <strong>River Otters</strong>
<em>Lutra canadensis</em>
These are the most hyperactive animals! I tried to photograph them at the Tennessee Aquarium in Chattanooga. I would love to see them in the wild where they have been released in the streams of ...

River Otters Lutra canadensis These are the most hyperactive animals! I tried to photograph them at the Tennessee Aquarium in Chattanooga. I would love to see them in the wild where they have been released in the streams of ...

River Otters Lutra canadensis These are the most hyperactive animals! I tried to photograph them at the Tennessee Aquarium in Chattanooga. I would love to see them in the wild where they have been released in the streams of the Smokies. River otters eat fish, frogs, crawfish, insects and birds. 2242
50 <strong>Mole</strong>
<em>Scapanus</em> spp. 
Seattle, WA
June 18, 2009

I hate to have to put a photo of a dead, bleeding <strong>Mole</strong> on here, but it does show a bit of the foot and pointed nose. I found this animal on the trail in a fi...

Mole Scapanus spp. Seattle, WA June 18, 2009 I hate to have to put a photo of a dead, bleeding Mole on here, but it does show a bit of the foot and pointed nose. I found this animal on the trail in a fi...

Mole Scapanus spp. Seattle, WA June 18, 2009 I hate to have to put a photo of a dead, bleeding Mole on here, but it does show a bit of the foot and pointed nose. I found this animal on the trail in a field at Samammish State Park in Seattle, it had probably been dug up by one of the many dogs we saw during our hike. Moles are insectivores, they eat earthworms, sowbugs, snails, and even a little bit of plant material. The huge front feet are adapted for digging and pushing soil aside. 1927
51 <b>Red Fox</b>

Red Fox

Red Fox Vulpes vulpes 1626
52 <b>Cougar</b> <i>Puma concolor</i>

Cougar Puma concolor

Cougar Puma concolor 1843
53 <b>Red Wolf</b> <i>Canis rufus</i>

Red Wolf Canis rufus

Red Wolf Canis rufus 1749
54 Squirrel acrobatics copy

Squirrel acrobatics copy

Squirrel acrobatics copy 1145

Adsense