All photographs copyright (2003-2013) by Kris H. Light

<strong>Little Brown Bat</strong>
<em>Myotis lucifugus</em>

This is one of the preserved Bats that I use in my outreach classes. I held it up so I could show a "see-through" view of the wing and leg bones. Bats have the same kinds of bones that hum...
Little Brown Bat
Myotis lucifugus

This is one of the preserved Bats that I use in my outreach classes. I held it up so I could show a "see-through" view of the wing and leg bones. Bats have the same kinds of bones that humans have in their arms, hands and legs, they are just proportioned a lot differently. Bats are NOT rodents, they are in the order Chiroptera, meaning "hand winged". The humerus (upper arm) bone is about half the length of the ulna and radius (lower arm bones), the thumb is the small hook at the upper bend in the wing and the other 4 fingers are the long, thin bones in the flying part of the wings.
A bat's wing membrane is extremely thin and can be damaged if people throw rocks or shoot BBs at them.
Bats are extremely beneficial, they can eat thousands of insects in a night. They use their large ears to pick up the reflected sounds they make, called echolocation. That is why bats often have such an erratic flight pattern, because they fly to the insects they detect in the air.

Adsense