All photographs copyright (2003-2013) by Kris H. Light

The <strong>Bagworm</strong> <em>(Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis #0457)</em> is a moth pupa. During the caterpillar phase, the larva bites off pieces of plants and adds them to the case as a form of camouflage. The caterpillar attaches the case to a bra...
The Bagworm (Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis #0457) is a moth pupa. During the caterpillar phase, the larva bites off pieces of plants and adds them to the case as a form of camouflage. The caterpillar attaches the case to a branch when it gets ready to pupate. If the moth is a male he will emerge from the bag and fly away to find a female. The female moths are true "bag ladies," because they have no wings they are confined to their cocoons. They give off an inticing pheremone to attract a male. In order for the male to have an encounter with the female he has to crawl into the bag with her. After mating, he leaves, she lays her eggs in the bag and then she dies. Later, the eggs hatch and the caterpillars leave the bag to start the cycle all over again.

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