Seashores - Florida, California and Washington coasts

This gallery contains information on seashells, sea animals, tides, and shorelines.
Image Number Image (Click to Enlarge)CaptionImage Viewed
1 Gulls on Navarre Beach at at the Gulf Islands National Seashore
The water in the Gulf of Mexico along the Panhandle of Florida is often a spectacular spectrum of aquamarine hues. The brilliant white sand in that area is nearly pure quartz, its origin ...

Gulls on Navarre Beach at at the Gulf Islands National Seashore The water in the Gulf of Mexico along the Panhandle of Florida is often a spectacular spectrum of aquamarine hues. The brilliant white sand in that area is nearly pure quartz, its origin ...

Gulls on Navarre Beach at at the Gulf Islands National Seashore The water in the Gulf of Mexico along the Panhandle of Florida is often a spectacular spectrum of aquamarine hues. The brilliant white sand in that area is nearly pure quartz, its origin was from the Appalachian mountains many millions of years ago. map... 19619
2 This was West Beach Resort at high tide the afternoon we arrived on Orcas Island, Washington. I was very surprised the next morning to see the beach at low tide! (see next photo)
Tides are caused by the gravitational pull of the moon and the sun on th...

This was West Beach Resort at high tide the afternoon we arrived on Orcas Island, Washington. I was very surprised the next morning to see the beach at low tide! (see next photo) Tides are caused by the gravitational pull of the moon and the sun on th...

This was West Beach Resort at high tide the afternoon we arrived on Orcas Island, Washington. I was very surprised the next morning to see the beach at low tide! (see next photo) Tides are caused by the gravitational pull of the moon and the sun on the water in the Earth's oceans. A bulge of water is pulled around the Earth 2 - 4 times a day, depending on the location. 3226
3 West Beach Resort at low tide the next morning revealed many interesting animals --- tiny crabs, hermit crabs and sculpins in the tidepools, beach hoppers and shore birds. It was amazing how far out the water was at low tide.

West Beach Resort at low tide the next morning revealed many interesting animals --- tiny crabs, hermit crabs and sculpins in the tidepools, beach hoppers and shore birds. It was amazing how far out the water was at low tide.

West Beach Resort at low tide the next morning revealed many interesting animals --- tiny crabs, hermit crabs and sculpins in the tidepools, beach hoppers and shore birds. It was amazing how far out the water was at low tide. 2555
4 The berm on a Sanibel Island beach after a storm. The berm is the where the average highest tide reaches on the beach. Because there had been large waves from a storm, there was a pronounced dropoff in the sand. Waves move the sand around a lot each ye...

The berm on a Sanibel Island beach after a storm. The berm is the where the average highest tide reaches on the beach. Because there had been large waves from a storm, there was a pronounced dropoff in the sand. Waves move the sand around a lot each ye...

The berm on a Sanibel Island beach after a storm. The berm is the where the average highest tide reaches on the beach. Because there had been large waves from a storm, there was a pronounced dropoff in the sand. Waves move the sand around a lot each year, bringing it in at times and taking it back out to sea at other times. 1986
5 <strong>Sea Oats</strong>
<em>Uniola paniculata</em> /Grass Family
Pensacola, FL<br>
Sea Oats are so vitally important to the dune ecosystems that many communities will impose $500 fines to people who pick, dig, or otherwise damage them. These plant...

Sea Oats Uniola paniculata /Grass Family Pensacola, FL
Sea Oats are so vitally important to the dune ecosystems that many communities will impose $500 fines to people who pick, dig, or otherwise damage them. These plant...

Sea Oats Uniola paniculata /Grass Family Pensacola, FL
Sea Oats are so vitally important to the dune ecosystems that many communities will impose $500 fines to people who pick, dig, or otherwise damage them. These plants have an extensive root system which helps hold the sand grains of the dunes, thus preventing erosion by wind and water. I doubt if these dunes or the the pier in the background at Pensacola Beach survived Hurricane Ivan's 20-foot storm surge and huge waves in September 2004. ***Update Dec. 2004 --- The pier is gone, as are miles of dunes and their protective sea oats.
2896
6 <strong>Striped Hermit Crab</strong>
<em>Clibanarius vittatus</em>
Santa Rosa Co., FL (Fundy Bay)
Aug. 31, 2007
These cute little hermit crabs live in empty snail shells. When I was a child I once caught a larger hermit crab and I held it the wrong...

Striped Hermit Crab Clibanarius vittatus Santa Rosa Co., FL (Fundy Bay) Aug. 31, 2007 These cute little hermit crabs live in empty snail shells. When I was a child I once caught a larger hermit crab and I held it the wrong...

Striped Hermit Crab Clibanarius vittatus Santa Rosa Co., FL (Fundy Bay) Aug. 31, 2007 These cute little hermit crabs live in empty snail shells. When I was a child I once caught a larger hermit crab and I held it the wrong way, it grabbed my hand with its pincher and wouldn't let go for over an hour. These crabs are marine organisms and should not be taken out of the water for extended periods of time, they must keep their gills wet in order to breathe. The Hermit crabs sold in pet stores are terrestrial and can survive on land. 3060
7 <strong>Striped Hermit crab</strong>
<em>Clibanarius vittatus</em>

Striped Hermit crab Clibanarius vittatus

Striped Hermit crab Clibanarius vittatus 2260
8 <strong>Giant Red Hermit Crab</strong>
<em>Petrochirus diogenes</em>
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 18, 2009

I photographed this crab in a touch tank at Tarpon Bay, but earlier in the week a teenage boy found one in a tide pool on the beach near our hot...

Giant Red Hermit Crab Petrochirus diogenes Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 18, 2009 I photographed this crab in a touch tank at Tarpon Bay, but earlier in the week a teenage boy found one in a tide pool on the beach near our hot...

Giant Red Hermit Crab Petrochirus diogenes Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 18, 2009 I photographed this crab in a touch tank at Tarpon Bay, but earlier in the week a teenage boy found one in a tide pool on the beach near our hotel. I wouldn't want to have this guy pinch me! This species can grow up to 7 inches! Hermit crabs inhabit empty gastropod shells, they are one of the original recyclers, nothing goes to waste in the ocean. :) 2896
9 I don't know the species of this tiny Hermit crab, I was amazed I even noticed it while beachcombing early one morning. The shell it occupied was only 1" long!

I don't know the species of this tiny Hermit crab, I was amazed I even noticed it while beachcombing early one morning. The shell it occupied was only 1" long!

I don't know the species of this tiny Hermit crab, I was amazed I even noticed it while beachcombing early one morning. The shell it occupied was only 1" long! 1906
10 <strong>Mud Fiddler Crab</strong> - female with eggs
<em>Uca pugnax</em>
Spanish - Cangrejo Violinista 
These little crabs live in holes in the sand and emerge at low tide to eat detritus. This crab is loaded down with thousands of tiny eggs that sh...

Mud Fiddler Crab - female with eggs Uca pugnax Spanish - Cangrejo Violinista These little crabs live in holes in the sand and emerge at low tide to eat detritus. This crab is loaded down with thousands of tiny eggs that sh...

Mud Fiddler Crab - female with eggs Uca pugnax Spanish - Cangrejo Violinista These little crabs live in holes in the sand and emerge at low tide to eat detritus. This crab is loaded down with thousands of tiny eggs that she will deposit in the water. 3204
11 <strong>Male Mud Fiddler Crab</strong>
<em>Uca pugnax</em>
These little crabs literally walk on their tiptoes but they sure can move fast! Males have one much larger claw that they use to attract the attention of the females. So, I guess with fiddler...

Male Mud Fiddler Crab Uca pugnax These little crabs literally walk on their tiptoes but they sure can move fast! Males have one much larger claw that they use to attract the attention of the females. So, I guess with fiddler...

Male Mud Fiddler Crab Uca pugnax These little crabs literally walk on their tiptoes but they sure can move fast! Males have one much larger claw that they use to attract the attention of the females. So, I guess with fiddler crabs, size does matter! ;) 3685
12 <strong>Red-jointed Fiddler Crab</strong> - male
<em>Uca minax</em>
Santa Rosa Co., FL Fundy Bay
August 31, 2007
The male fiddler crab uses its oversized claw to attract a female for mating and to intimidate other males. The smaller claw is used fo...

Red-jointed Fiddler Crab - male Uca minax Santa Rosa Co., FL Fundy Bay August 31, 2007 The male fiddler crab uses its oversized claw to attract a female for mating and to intimidate other males. The smaller claw is used fo...

Red-jointed Fiddler Crab - male Uca minax Santa Rosa Co., FL Fundy Bay August 31, 2007 The male fiddler crab uses its oversized claw to attract a female for mating and to intimidate other males. The smaller claw is used for eating because the larger one extends beyond the crab's mouth. Like many other burrowing crabs, this crab has special sockets where the eyes fit when the crab is in its hole. 2379
13 These holes and sandballs were made by Fiddler Crabs. The large balls were made during excavation of the hole, the small ones were made during feeding. The crabs roll balls of sand in front of their mouth to extract bits of organic material to eat. The...

These holes and sandballs were made by Fiddler Crabs. The large balls were made during excavation of the hole, the small ones were made during feeding. The crabs roll balls of sand in front of their mouth to extract bits of organic material to eat. The...

These holes and sandballs were made by Fiddler Crabs. The large balls were made during excavation of the hole, the small ones were made during feeding. The crabs roll balls of sand in front of their mouth to extract bits of organic material to eat. The beach can be covered by these small balls of sand at low tide. The tunnel in the upper right corner was made by a mole cricket. 2320
14 <strong>Male Atlantic Blue Crab</strong> - A "Jimmy"
<em>Callinectes sapidus</em>
Fundy Bay, FL
Aug. 31, 2007
I photographed this big guy at the edge of Fundy Bay, he had been having a territorial dispute with another male just minutes earlier, the...

Male Atlantic Blue Crab - A "Jimmy" Callinectes sapidus Fundy Bay, FL Aug. 31, 2007 I photographed this big guy at the edge of Fundy Bay, he had been having a territorial dispute with another male just minutes earlier, the...

Male Atlantic Blue Crab - A "Jimmy" Callinectes sapidus Fundy Bay, FL Aug. 31, 2007 I photographed this big guy at the edge of Fundy Bay, he had been having a territorial dispute with another male just minutes earlier, then my parents' dog came to investigate, so he was not a happy crab! The following website has a good way of showing how to tell male blue crabs from the females. 2711
15 No, these blue crabs are not hugging or dancing! We saw these two Blue Crabs fighting with each other in a territory dispute at Grassy Cove beach.

No, these blue crabs are not hugging or dancing! We saw these two Blue Crabs fighting with each other in a territory dispute at Grassy Cove beach.

No, these blue crabs are not hugging or dancing! We saw these two Blue Crabs fighting with each other in a territory dispute at Grassy Cove beach. 2796
16 <strong>Female Atlantic Blue Crab</strong> - a "Sally" or "Sook"
<em>Callinectes sapidus</em>
Female Atlantic Blue Crabs are more "dainty" and they have red tips on their claws like fingernail polish! The immature females are called a "She-crab" or a...

Female Atlantic Blue Crab - a "Sally" or "Sook" Callinectes sapidus Female Atlantic Blue Crabs are more "dainty" and they have red tips on their claws like fingernail polish! The immature females are called a "She-crab" or a...

Female Atlantic Blue Crab - a "Sally" or "Sook" Callinectes sapidus Female Atlantic Blue Crabs are more "dainty" and they have red tips on their claws like fingernail polish! The immature females are called a "She-crab" or a "Sally" and the mature females are called a "Sook". It is possible to identify them by looking at the pattern on the lower part of the shell called the apron, the female has a wide center section to accomodate her eggs. I didn't catch this one to look at her underparts, so I don't know which she is. Maybe she was why the two males were fighting! :) 2114
17 <strong>Ghost Crab</strong>
<em>Ocypode quadrata</em>
Navarre Beach, FL
July 28, 2009

These little white crabs exit their holes in the sand at dusk to scavenge and filter feed each evening. They are very skittish and quickly run back to their bur...

Ghost Crab Ocypode quadrata Navarre Beach, FL July 28, 2009 These little white crabs exit their holes in the sand at dusk to scavenge and filter feed each evening. They are very skittish and quickly run back to their bur...

Ghost Crab Ocypode quadrata Navarre Beach, FL July 28, 2009 These little white crabs exit their holes in the sand at dusk to scavenge and filter feed each evening. They are very skittish and quickly run back to their burrows if they feel threatened. I had to stand very still to get this shot with my telephoto lens. When I moved slowly to get a better angle, the crab retreated into its hole and I didn't see it again. The burrows can go as deep as 4 feet, so it would be difficult to try to dig a crab out! Note how the eyes are on stalks. When the crab is in its burrow, the eyes swivel down and fit into the hollow areas of the shell. 2939
18 Juvenile Ghost Crabs are small and extremely well-camouflaged. It is fun to sit quietly and watch them come out of their holes. They are very sensitive to motion, any movement will send them racing to the safety to their burrow in a split second.

Juvenile Ghost Crabs are small and extremely well-camouflaged. It is fun to sit quietly and watch them come out of their holes. They are very sensitive to motion, any movement will send them racing to the safety to their burrow in a split second.

Juvenile Ghost Crabs are small and extremely well-camouflaged. It is fun to sit quietly and watch them come out of their holes. They are very sensitive to motion, any movement will send them racing to the safety to their burrow in a split second. 1859
19 I spotted this adult male Crab Ghost Crab on the beach at low tide early one morning on Sanibel Island. They are most active before sunrise. They eat coquina clams, mole crabs and goodies that wash up high on the beach.

I spotted this adult male Crab Ghost Crab on the beach at low tide early one morning on Sanibel Island. They are most active before sunrise. They eat coquina clams, mole crabs and goodies that wash up high on the beach.

I spotted this adult male Crab Ghost Crab on the beach at low tide early one morning on Sanibel Island. They are most active before sunrise. They eat coquina clams, mole crabs and goodies that wash up high on the beach. 2391
20 At night, Ghost Crabs run down to the surf to to feed. It was fun to go out with our flashlights and watch them scurry down into the water! They eat dead fish, Coquina clam animals, and tiny creatures that live in the sand washed over by the surf.

At night, Ghost Crabs run down to the surf to to feed. It was fun to go out with our flashlights and watch them scurry down into the water! They eat dead fish, Coquina clam animals, and tiny creatures that live in the sand washed over by the surf.

At night, Ghost Crabs run down to the surf to to feed. It was fun to go out with our flashlights and watch them scurry down into the water! They eat dead fish, Coquina clam animals, and tiny creatures that live in the sand washed over by the surf. 1858
21 <strong>Calico Crab</strong>
<em>Hepatus epheliticus</em>
St. George Island, FL
Dec. 20, 2009

Unfortunately, this beautiful crab was dead on the beach. What a striking pattern it has!

Calico Crab Hepatus epheliticus St. George Island, FL Dec. 20, 2009 Unfortunately, this beautiful crab was dead on the beach. What a striking pattern it has!

Calico Crab Hepatus epheliticus St. George Island, FL Dec. 20, 2009 Unfortunately, this beautiful crab was dead on the beach. What a striking pattern it has! 2513
22 <strong>Portly Spider Crab</strong>
<em>Libinia emarginata</em>
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 15, 2009

This was another "overnight casualty" that had washed up on the beach. Before this trip, I didn't realize how many different kinds of crabs can be fo...

Portly Spider Crab Libinia emarginata Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 15, 2009 This was another "overnight casualty" that had washed up on the beach. Before this trip, I didn't realize how many different kinds of crabs can be fo...

Portly Spider Crab Libinia emarginata Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 15, 2009 This was another "overnight casualty" that had washed up on the beach. Before this trip, I didn't realize how many different kinds of crabs can be found in Florida. 2315
23 <strong>Spotted Mangrove Crab</strong>
<em>Goniopsis cruentata</em>
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 18, 2009

It was quite a surprise to see these little crabs scurrying around on the branches and roots of the red mangrove trees. They were quite shy and w...

Spotted Mangrove Crab Goniopsis cruentata Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 18, 2009 It was quite a surprise to see these little crabs scurrying around on the branches and roots of the red mangrove trees. They were quite shy and w...

Spotted Mangrove Crab Goniopsis cruentata Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 18, 2009 It was quite a surprise to see these little crabs scurrying around on the branches and roots of the red mangrove trees. They were quite shy and would move to the opposite side of the branch pretty quickly, I had to snap my pictures fast! 3175
24 <strong>Tube of Parchment Worm</strong>
<em>Chaetopterus variopedatus</em>
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 15, 2009

This tube was the former home of a worm that had buried in the sand. This is a common sight on many beaches.

Tube of Parchment Worm Chaetopterus variopedatus Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 15, 2009 This tube was the former home of a worm that had buried in the sand. This is a common sight on many beaches.

Tube of Parchment Worm Chaetopterus variopedatus Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 15, 2009 This tube was the former home of a worm that had buried in the sand. This is a common sight on many beaches. 2935
25 <strong>Plumed Worm</strong> and tube
Family - Onuphidae
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 15, 2009

I didn't realize I had photographed the worm with the tube until I downloaded and enlarged this picture. The worm is the thin brown object on the left side ...

Plumed Worm and tube Family - Onuphidae Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 15, 2009 I didn't realize I had photographed the worm with the tube until I downloaded and enlarged this picture. The worm is the thin brown object on the left side ...

Plumed Worm and tube Family - Onuphidae Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 15, 2009 I didn't realize I had photographed the worm with the tube until I downloaded and enlarged this picture. The worm is the thin brown object on the left side of the tube. These worms live in tubes in the sand that are about the size of a soda straw, they often glue bits of shells and other small pieces of "beach junk" on the ends of the tubes. 2882
26 <strong>Calcareous tube worms</strong> and barnacles on a large Cockle shell

Calcareous tube worms and barnacles on a large Cockle shell

Calcareous tube worms and barnacles on a large Cockle shell 2707
27 I found several of these inch-long translucent worms on the beach at low tide. I'm sure they made tasty little morsels for the shore birds and other beach animals.

I found several of these inch-long translucent worms on the beach at low tide. I'm sure they made tasty little morsels for the shore birds and other beach animals.

I found several of these inch-long translucent worms on the beach at low tide. I'm sure they made tasty little morsels for the shore birds and other beach animals. 3924
28 <strong>Sandy fecal cast of an Acorn "Worm"</strong>
<em>Balanoglossus aurantiacus</em>
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 17, 2009

All that is visible of the worm in this photo is the pale yellow tube which is extruding the sandy fecal cast. The animal is ...

Sandy fecal cast of an Acorn "Worm" Balanoglossus aurantiacus Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 17, 2009 All that is visible of the worm in this photo is the pale yellow tube which is extruding the sandy fecal cast. The animal is ...

Sandy fecal cast of an Acorn "Worm" Balanoglossus aurantiacus Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 17, 2009 All that is visible of the worm in this photo is the pale yellow tube which is extruding the sandy fecal cast. The animal is not a true worm, but a hemichordate. 3052
29 <strong>Nine-armed Sea star</strong>
<em>Luidia senegalensis</em>
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 16, 2009

I found this seastar in the water of a tidepool, I took it out long enough to photograph it, then returned it to the water.

Nine-armed Sea star Luidia senegalensis Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 16, 2009 I found this seastar in the water of a tidepool, I took it out long enough to photograph it, then returned it to the water.

Nine-armed Sea star Luidia senegalensis Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 16, 2009 I found this seastar in the water of a tidepool, I took it out long enough to photograph it, then returned it to the water. 2548
30 <strong>Thorny Starfish</strong>
<em>Echinaster spinulosus</em>
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 15, 2009

This little sea star was only about 2" across. I always pitched the animals I thought might still be alive back into the surf in hopes they would mak...

Thorny Starfish Echinaster spinulosus Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 15, 2009 This little sea star was only about 2" across. I always pitched the animals I thought might still be alive back into the surf in hopes they would mak...

Thorny Starfish Echinaster spinulosus Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 15, 2009 This little sea star was only about 2" across. I always pitched the animals I thought might still be alive back into the surf in hopes they would make it another day. Live animals should never be removed from the beach, not only because they will die out of their natural environment, but they also stink to high heaven later on!!! I have seen stacks of sand dollars left on the beach or on picnic tables that people have removed from the water only to find out they reek before the people leave for the day. What a shame to kill the animals and then just leave them to rot. 2751
31 This Sea Star is using its orange tube feet to force open an oyster shell for its dinner. Once the sea star gets the shell open just a tiny bit, it will extrude its stomach into the oyster and eat the animal inside.

This Sea Star is using its orange tube feet to force open an oyster shell for its dinner. Once the sea star gets the shell open just a tiny bit, it will extrude its stomach into the oyster and eat the animal inside.

This Sea Star is using its orange tube feet to force open an oyster shell for its dinner. Once the sea star gets the shell open just a tiny bit, it will extrude its stomach into the oyster and eat the animal inside. 2081
32 Part of a of Sea Urchin shell

Part of a of Sea Urchin shell

Part of a of Sea Urchin shell 1829
33 <strong>Short-spined Sea Urchin</strong> (varigated)
<em>Lytechinus variegatus</em>
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 15, 2009

These pretty little urchins were often seen on the beach at low tide. I found lots of their shells at the high tide line too. The...

Short-spined Sea Urchin (varigated) Lytechinus variegatus Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 15, 2009 These pretty little urchins were often seen on the beach at low tide. I found lots of their shells at the high tide line too. The...

Short-spined Sea Urchin (varigated) Lytechinus variegatus Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 15, 2009 These pretty little urchins were often seen on the beach at low tide. I found lots of their shells at the high tide line too. The spines break off easily after the animal dies, leaving a shell with bumps and holes. 3403
34 I flipped this Sea Urchin over to show the mouth in the middle of its underside. The 5 white parts are called "Aristotle's Lantern", similar to the 5 white "doves" in the center of a Sand Dollar or Keyhole Urchin. Note the tiny brown tube feet visible ...

I flipped this Sea Urchin over to show the mouth in the middle of its underside. The 5 white parts are called "Aristotle's Lantern", similar to the 5 white "doves" in the center of a Sand Dollar or Keyhole Urchin. Note the tiny brown tube feet visible ...

I flipped this Sea Urchin over to show the mouth in the middle of its underside. The 5 white parts are called "Aristotle's Lantern", similar to the 5 white "doves" in the center of a Sand Dollar or Keyhole Urchin. Note the tiny brown tube feet visible between the thicker spines. The urchins use these feet to carry food to their mouth. 2435
35 <strong>Purple Sea Whip</strong>
<em>Leptogorgia virgulata</em>
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 16, 2009

This common soft coral is often found washed up on the beach.

Purple Sea Whip Leptogorgia virgulata Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 16, 2009 This common soft coral is often found washed up on the beach.

Purple Sea Whip Leptogorgia virgulata Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 16, 2009 This common soft coral is often found washed up on the beach. 2223
36 This close-up of the Purple Sea Whip coral shows the holes where the polyps lived when it was alive.
The brown, stalked organism is the remains of a colony of bryozoans.

This close-up of the Purple Sea Whip coral shows the holes where the polyps lived when it was alive. The brown, stalked organism is the remains of a colony of bryozoans.

This close-up of the Purple Sea Whip coral shows the holes where the polyps lived when it was alive. The brown, stalked organism is the remains of a colony of bryozoans. 1781
37 <strong>Red Sponge</strong>
<em>Haliclona rubens</em>
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 25, 2009

No matter how tempting it may be to collect an interesting beach artifact like this, just leave it where you found it. The smell of dead sea creatures is awful...

Red Sponge Haliclona rubens Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 25, 2009 No matter how tempting it may be to collect an interesting beach artifact like this, just leave it where you found it. The smell of dead sea creatures is awful...

Red Sponge Haliclona rubens Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 25, 2009 No matter how tempting it may be to collect an interesting beach artifact like this, just leave it where you found it. The smell of dead sea creatures is awful! The Gulf Coast is famous for commercial sponge collecting. 2408
38 A Yellow Sponge

A Yellow Sponge

A Yellow Sponge 1615
39 <strong>Sargassum weed; Gulfweed, Rockweed, or Sea Holly</strong> (Seaweed)
<em>Sargassum</em> spp. 
Navarre Beach, FL
Sept. 2, 2007
This is a marine alga, it is not a plant. Sargassum provides an important marine habitat for many small animals. It...

Sargassum weed; Gulfweed, Rockweed, or Sea Holly (Seaweed) Sargassum spp. Navarre Beach, FL Sept. 2, 2007 This is a marine alga, it is not a plant. Sargassum provides an important marine habitat for many small animals. It...

Sargassum weed; Gulfweed, Rockweed, or Sea Holly (Seaweed) Sargassum spp. Navarre Beach, FL Sept. 2, 2007 This is a marine alga, it is not a plant. Sargassum provides an important marine habitat for many small animals. It is fun to look for tiny crabs in floating pieces! 3273
40 <strong>Common Bugula</strong> (brown) and <strong>Sargassum Sea Mat Bryozoans</strong> (white) 
<em>Bugula neritina</em>  and <em>Membranipora tuberculata</em>

These are the remains of two types of Bryozoans, minute colonial filter-feeding animals...

Common Bugula (brown) and Sargassum Sea Mat Bryozoans (white) Bugula neritina and Membranipora tuberculata These are the remains of two types of Bryozoans, minute colonial filter-feeding animals...

Common Bugula (brown) and Sargassum Sea Mat Bryozoans (white) Bugula neritina and Membranipora tuberculata These are the remains of two types of Bryozoans, minute colonial filter-feeding animals. The tiny animals that lived in the little openings were called zooids. The brown Bugula remains could easily be mistaken for a brown or reddish seaweed, but it is neither a plant nor an alga. 1887
41 A white Bryozoan 
<em>Bugula</em> spp.?

This was hard to photograph with a macro lens because it was nearly spherical. The tiny zooids lived in the little white branches.

A white Bryozoan Bugula spp.? This was hard to photograph with a macro lens because it was nearly spherical. The tiny zooids lived in the little white branches.

A white Bryozoan Bugula spp.? This was hard to photograph with a macro lens because it was nearly spherical. The tiny zooids lived in the little white branches. 1584
42 <strong>Sea Purslane</strong>
<em>Sesuvium portulacastrum</em>
Navarre Beach, FL
Sept. 2, 2007
This plant was growing at the base of a dune-retaining fence on the beach. The dunes were washed away during the storm surge of Hurricane Dennis in 2005....

Sea Purslane Sesuvium portulacastrum Navarre Beach, FL Sept. 2, 2007 This plant was growing at the base of a dune-retaining fence on the beach. The dunes were washed away during the storm surge of Hurricane Dennis in 2005....

Sea Purslane Sesuvium portulacastrum Navarre Beach, FL Sept. 2, 2007 This plant was growing at the base of a dune-retaining fence on the beach. The dunes were washed away during the storm surge of Hurricane Dennis in 2005. Sand was pumped onto the beach in 2006 and Sea Oats these plants were planted to stabilize the dunes. 1974
43 <strong>Seagrape</strong> fruits
<em>Coccoloba uvifera</em> / Buckwheat family
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 15, 2009

Seagrapes are edible when ripe and can be made into jam and jelly. The thick, leathery leaves allow the trees to live in the adverse c...

Seagrape fruits Coccoloba uvifera / Buckwheat family Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 15, 2009 Seagrapes are edible when ripe and can be made into jam and jelly. The thick, leathery leaves allow the trees to live in the adverse c...

Seagrape fruits Coccoloba uvifera / Buckwheat family Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 15, 2009 Seagrapes are edible when ripe and can be made into jam and jelly. The thick, leathery leaves allow the trees to live in the adverse conditions of the beach and near mangrove swamps. 1665
44 <strong>Sea Nettle Jellyfish</strong>
<em>Chrysaora quinquecirrha</em>
Navarre Beach, FL

Sea Nettle Jellyfish Chrysaora quinquecirrha Navarre Beach, FL

Sea Nettle Jellyfish Chrysaora quinquecirrha Navarre Beach, FL 3384
45 <strong>Moon Jellyfish</strong> - male
<em>Aurelia aurita</em>
This beautiful jellyfish was washed up on Navarre beach. It is best to just enjoy these animals at a distance, they can still sting when they are dead. Normally, the stingers are used to ...

Moon Jellyfish - male Aurelia aurita This beautiful jellyfish was washed up on Navarre beach. It is best to just enjoy these animals at a distance, they can still sting when they are dead. Normally, the stingers are used to ...

Moon Jellyfish - male Aurelia aurita This beautiful jellyfish was washed up on Navarre beach. It is best to just enjoy these animals at a distance, they can still sting when they are dead. Normally, the stingers are used to paralyze small fish. This specimen was the size of a dinner plate. The "flower-like" structure is the reproductive parts of the jellyfish, they are pink in males and yellow in females. 3034
46 The Bailey-Matthews Shell Musem on Sanibel Island is a "must-do" for visitors to the island. It has an extensive collection of beautiful shells from south Florida and all over the world.

The Bailey-Matthews Shell Musem on Sanibel Island is a "must-do" for visitors to the island. It has an extensive collection of beautiful shells from south Florida and all over the world.

The Bailey-Matthews Shell Musem on Sanibel Island is a "must-do" for visitors to the island. It has an extensive collection of beautiful shells from south Florida and all over the world. 1669
47 This display in the Shell Musem shows how the bivalve clams and cockles use their foot to dig into the sand and their siphons to filter food particles from the water.

This display in the Shell Musem shows how the bivalve clams and cockles use their foot to dig into the sand and their siphons to filter food particles from the water.

This display in the Shell Musem shows how the bivalve clams and cockles use their foot to dig into the sand and their siphons to filter food particles from the water. 1928
48 A display of a buried Pen Shell (left) and Dosina at the Shell Museum. The Pen shell uses the brown "byssal threads" to attach itself in the sand.

A display of a buried Pen Shell (left) and Dosina at the Shell Museum. The Pen shell uses the brown "byssal threads" to attach itself in the sand.

A display of a buried Pen Shell (left) and Dosina at the Shell Museum. The Pen shell uses the brown "byssal threads" to attach itself in the sand. 1718
49 <strong>The "Sanibel Stoop"</strong>

This is an every day sight on the beaches of Sanibel Island. Each morning many people are out scouring the sand to see what the tide brought in overnight.

The "Sanibel Stoop" This is an every day sight on the beaches of Sanibel Island. Each morning many people are out scouring the sand to see what the tide brought in overnight.

The "Sanibel Stoop" This is an every day sight on the beaches of Sanibel Island. Each morning many people are out scouring the sand to see what the tide brought in overnight. 1555
50 A small sample of the mix of shells on Sanibel Island's beaches. Sanibel is a beachcomber's paradise! :) It is the best beach in America and the 3rd best in the world for shells. Most of the shells are halves of bivalves since they are preyed upon by t...

A small sample of the mix of shells on Sanibel Island's beaches. Sanibel is a beachcomber's paradise! :) It is the best beach in America and the 3rd best in the world for shells. Most of the shells are halves of bivalves since they are preyed upon by t...

A small sample of the mix of shells on Sanibel Island's beaches. Sanibel is a beachcomber's paradise! :) It is the best beach in America and the 3rd best in the world for shells. Most of the shells are halves of bivalves since they are preyed upon by the single-shelled gastropods, crabs, sea stars and other animals. 1505
51 <strong>Variable Coquinas</strong> 
<em>Donax variabilis</em> / Bivalve
Navarre Beach, FL
July 2008 

Coquinas are molluscs that live just along the waterline, they get exposed by waves and must quickly dig into the sand to avoid being eaten by sh...

Variable Coquinas Donax variabilis / Bivalve Navarre Beach, FL July 2008 Coquinas are molluscs that live just along the waterline, they get exposed by waves and must quickly dig into the sand to avoid being eaten by sh...

Variable Coquinas Donax variabilis / Bivalve Navarre Beach, FL July 2008 Coquinas are molluscs that live just along the waterline, they get exposed by waves and must quickly dig into the sand to avoid being eaten by shore birds and Ghost Crabs. The strong, muscular foot is visible in this photo. These little animals are very fast, it is not easy to photograph them before they disappear beneath the sand. There is a type of rock called coquina that is made of compressed seashells. My guess is that it would eventually turn to limestone. 2725
52 The siphons of this live Variable Coquina are visible on the right, it soon buried into the sand and disappeared from sight. The strong brown ligament visible in the middle of the shell often remains after the animal dies, the shells look like small bu...

The siphons of this live Variable Coquina are visible on the right, it soon buried into the sand and disappeared from sight. The strong brown ligament visible in the middle of the shell often remains after the animal dies, the shells look like small bu...

The siphons of this live Variable Coquina are visible on the right, it soon buried into the sand and disappeared from sight. The strong brown ligament visible in the middle of the shell often remains after the animal dies, the shells look like small butterflies. 1794
53 <strong>Giant Bittersweet Clam</strong> 
<em>Glycymeris americana</em> / Bivalve
Navarre Beach, FL
July 2008

I found this shell on the edge of the beach in the water. Although all bivalves start out life with 2 shells, most are found on the beach...

Giant Bittersweet Clam Glycymeris americana / Bivalve Navarre Beach, FL July 2008 I found this shell on the edge of the beach in the water. Although all bivalves start out life with 2 shells, most are found on the beach...

Giant Bittersweet Clam Glycymeris americana / Bivalve Navarre Beach, FL July 2008 I found this shell on the edge of the beach in the water. Although all bivalves start out life with 2 shells, most are found on the beach with just one shell because the ligament that holds them together breaks apart after they die. 2601
54 <strong>Atlantic Calico Scallop shell</strong>
<em>Argopecten gibbus</em> / Bivalve
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 15, 2009

These beautiful maroon, white and pink shells were very common on the beach. Since they are <em>bivalves</em>, live scallops have...

Atlantic Calico Scallop shell Argopecten gibbus / Bivalve Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 15, 2009 These beautiful maroon, white and pink shells were very common on the beach. Since they are bivalves, live scallops have...

Atlantic Calico Scallop shell Argopecten gibbus / Bivalve Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 15, 2009 These beautiful maroon, white and pink shells were very common on the beach. Since they are bivalves, live scallops have 2 shells. They have tiny blue eyes at the edge of their mantle and can move away from danger quickly by "jet propulsion" opening and closing their shells rapidly. 2887
55 <strong>Southern Surf Clam</strong> - live
<em>Spisula raveneli</em> / Bivalve
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 16, 2009

I found this live animal on a sandbar at low tide. It can bury into the sand with a strong foot. Clams are filter feeders that pull wa...

Southern Surf Clam - live Spisula raveneli / Bivalve Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 16, 2009 I found this live animal on a sandbar at low tide. It can bury into the sand with a strong foot. Clams are filter feeders that pull wa...

Southern Surf Clam - live Spisula raveneli / Bivalve Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 16, 2009 I found this live animal on a sandbar at low tide. It can bury into the sand with a strong foot. Clams are filter feeders that pull water into their body through one siphon and expel it out the other siphon. 2450
56 <strong>Southern Surf Clam</strong> siphons just barely visible sticking out of the sand. Sometimes it is possible to see water squirting from the valves.

Southern Surf Clam siphons just barely visible sticking out of the sand. Sometimes it is possible to see water squirting from the valves.

Southern Surf Clam siphons just barely visible sticking out of the sand. Sometimes it is possible to see water squirting from the valves. 1640
57 <strong>Cross-barred Venus Clam</strong>
<em>Chione elevata</em> / Bivalve
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 16, 2009

These shells are very easy to identify due to their distinctive cross-hatched lines. The lines may help deter predatory snails that cut th...

Cross-barred Venus Clam Chione elevata / Bivalve Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 16, 2009 These shells are very easy to identify due to their distinctive cross-hatched lines. The lines may help deter predatory snails that cut th...

Cross-barred Venus Clam Chione elevata / Bivalve Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 16, 2009 These shells are very easy to identify due to their distinctive cross-hatched lines. The lines may help deter predatory snails that cut through the shells to eat the animal inside. 2248
58 <strong>Sunray Venus Clam</strong>
<em>Macrocallista maculata</em> / Bivalve
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 16, 2009

The man who found these two shells together really hit the jackpot! The odds of finding the matching shells are astronomical!

Sunray Venus Clam Macrocallista maculata / Bivalve Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 16, 2009 The man who found these two shells together really hit the jackpot! The odds of finding the matching shells are astronomical!

Sunray Venus Clam Macrocallista maculata / Bivalve Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 16, 2009 The man who found these two shells together really hit the jackpot! The odds of finding the matching shells are astronomical! 2331
59 <strong>Giant Atlantic Cockle; Heart Cockle</strong>
<em>Dinocardium robustum</em> / Bivalve
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 16, 2009

These were some of the largest bivalve shells I found on the beach (other than the Pen shells).

Giant Atlantic Cockle; Heart Cockle Dinocardium robustum / Bivalve Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 16, 2009 These were some of the largest bivalve shells I found on the beach (other than the Pen shells).

Giant Atlantic Cockle; Heart Cockle Dinocardium robustum / Bivalve Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 16, 2009 These were some of the largest bivalve shells I found on the beach (other than the Pen shells). 2127
60 <strong>Sawtooth Penshell</strong>
<em>Atrina serrata</em> / Bivalve
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 15, 2009

These large shells are found along the high tide line on the beach. The insides of the penshells has a beautiful bluish iridescent <em>nacre</em>.

Sawtooth Penshell Atrina serrata / Bivalve Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 15, 2009 These large shells are found along the high tide line on the beach. The insides of the penshells has a beautiful bluish iridescent nacre.

Sawtooth Penshell Atrina serrata / Bivalve Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 15, 2009 These large shells are found along the high tide line on the beach. The insides of the penshells has a beautiful bluish iridescent nacre. 2678
61 <strong>Stiff Penshell</strong>
<em>Atrina rigida</em> / Bivalve
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 18, 2009

Stiff Pen shells have sharp points on the upper edges. The white foot of this live Pen Shell is visible. The animal uses the foot to bury into the s...

Stiff Penshell Atrina rigida / Bivalve Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 18, 2009 Stiff Pen shells have sharp points on the upper edges. The white foot of this live Pen Shell is visible. The animal uses the foot to bury into the s...

Stiff Penshell Atrina rigida / Bivalve Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 18, 2009 Stiff Pen shells have sharp points on the upper edges. The white foot of this live Pen Shell is visible. The animal uses the foot to bury into the sand. I photographed it in the touch tank at the Tarpon Bay Education Center. 2425
62 <strong>Disc Dosina</strong>
<em>Dosina discus</em>
St. George Island, FL
Dec. 20, 2009

The hinge that holds the shells together when the animal is alive is quite strong in these shells, therefore it is possible to find them still attached on the...

Disc Dosina Dosina discus St. George Island, FL Dec. 20, 2009 The hinge that holds the shells together when the animal is alive is quite strong in these shells, therefore it is possible to find them still attached on the...

Disc Dosina Dosina discus St. George Island, FL Dec. 20, 2009 The hinge that holds the shells together when the animal is alive is quite strong in these shells, therefore it is possible to find them still attached on the beach after the animal has died. I separated these two so I could get a better photo. The small hole in the shell on the right is an indication that a predatory snail killed and ate the clam. 2767
63 <strong>Atlantic Kitten Paw</strong>
<em>Plicatula gibbosa</em> / Bivalve
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 15, 2009

I just love these little shells, they really do look like tiny cats' feet! :) Usually only the left shell is found, the right one often rem...

Atlantic Kitten Paw Plicatula gibbosa / Bivalve Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 15, 2009 I just love these little shells, they really do look like tiny cats' feet! :) Usually only the left shell is found, the right one often rem...

Atlantic Kitten Paw Plicatula gibbosa / Bivalve Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 15, 2009 I just love these little shells, they really do look like tiny cats' feet! :) Usually only the left shell is found, the right one often remains on the object the animal was attached to. 2574
64 <strong>Florida Spiny Jewelbox</strong>
<em>Arcinella cornuta</em> / Bivalve

Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 15, 2009

By the time these shells wash up on the beach they have lost their long spines, only the knobs are left. The shells are often a pretty...

Florida Spiny Jewelbox Arcinella cornuta / Bivalve Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 15, 2009 By the time these shells wash up on the beach they have lost their long spines, only the knobs are left. The shells are often a pretty...

Florida Spiny Jewelbox Arcinella cornuta / Bivalve Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 15, 2009 By the time these shells wash up on the beach they have lost their long spines, only the knobs are left. The shells are often a pretty pink on the inside. 1999
65 <strong>Broad-ribbed Cardita</strong>
<em>Carditamera floridana</em> / Bivalve
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 15, 2009

These thick, tough shells are very common on Florida Gulf beaches.

Broad-ribbed Cardita Carditamera floridana / Bivalve Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 15, 2009 These thick, tough shells are very common on Florida Gulf beaches.

Broad-ribbed Cardita Carditamera floridana / Bivalve Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 15, 2009 These thick, tough shells are very common on Florida Gulf beaches. 2447
66 Seashells become blackened by iron sulfide after being buried in sulfurous mud. Fossil sharks' teeth are blackened for the same reason.

Seashells become blackened by iron sulfide after being buried in sulfurous mud. Fossil sharks' teeth are blackened for the same reason.

Seashells become blackened by iron sulfide after being buried in sulfurous mud. Fossil sharks' teeth are blackened for the same reason. 1654
67 It is common to find Seashells with round holes in them washed up on the beach. The animal that had been in this shell was eaten by a marine snail. These snails have a rasping mouthpart called a <em>radula</em> which can drill through the hard shell.

It is common to find Seashells with round holes in them washed up on the beach. The animal that had been in this shell was eaten by a marine snail. These snails have a rasping mouthpart called a radula which can drill through the hard shell.

It is common to find Seashells with round holes in them washed up on the beach. The animal that had been in this shell was eaten by a marine snail. These snails have a rasping mouthpart called a radula which can drill through the hard shell. 2199
68 This shell has been bored by polychaete worms.

This shell has been bored by polychaete worms.

This shell has been bored by polychaete worms. 1702
69 A sponge-bored shell 

I had always wondered why some shells had lots of little holes, like this one. The <em>Florida's Living Beaches</em> book explains it was once the attachment for a boring sponge which secreted an acid to make the holes. The lit...

A sponge-bored shell I had always wondered why some shells had lots of little holes, like this one. The Florida's Living Beaches book explains it was once the attachment for a boring sponge which secreted an acid to make the holes. The lit...

A sponge-bored shell I had always wondered why some shells had lots of little holes, like this one. The Florida's Living Beaches book explains it was once the attachment for a boring sponge which secreted an acid to make the holes. The little brown cylinders are Ghost Shrimp feces. The small hole is the shrimp's home. 3082
70 Tunicate or anemone(?) on Lightning Whelk shell

Although the animal in the shell is gone, it still a home for many other animals.

Tunicate or anemone(?) on Lightning Whelk shell Although the animal in the shell is gone, it still a home for many other animals.

Tunicate or anemone(?) on Lightning Whelk shell Although the animal in the shell is gone, it still a home for many other animals. 2297
71 <strong>Seahorse</strong> - female

I photographed this seahorse in an aquarium at the education center at Tarpon Bay on Sanibel Island. The educator pointed out some small orange eggs that she had tried to lay in her partner's pouch earlier in the d...

Seahorse - female I photographed this seahorse in an aquarium at the education center at Tarpon Bay on Sanibel Island. The educator pointed out some small orange eggs that she had tried to lay in her partner's pouch earlier in the d...

Seahorse - female I photographed this seahorse in an aquarium at the education center at Tarpon Bay on Sanibel Island. The educator pointed out some small orange eggs that she had tried to lay in her partner's pouch earlier in the day -- she missed! 1618
72 This model of a Shark's Eye snail in a display at the Shell Musem shows what the living animal looks like. It is amazing that so much animal can fit into the little shell! Shark's Eyes and Moon Snails use their sharp radula (tongue) to rasp a round hol...

This model of a Shark's Eye snail in a display at the Shell Musem shows what the living animal looks like. It is amazing that so much animal can fit into the little shell! Shark's Eyes and Moon Snails use their sharp radula (tongue) to rasp a round hol...

This model of a Shark's Eye snail in a display at the Shell Musem shows what the living animal looks like. It is amazing that so much animal can fit into the little shell! Shark's Eyes and Moon Snails use their sharp radula (tongue) to rasp a round hole in the shells of bivalves (and sometimes other gastropods) to eat the animal in side. 2485
73 <strong>Shark's Eye</strong>
<em>Neverita duplicata</em> / Gastropod
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 16, 2009

I wish I could say I found this shell, but someone else did and I photographed it. These snails are responsible for many of the clam shells that...

Shark's Eye Neverita duplicata / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 16, 2009 I wish I could say I found this shell, but someone else did and I photographed it. These snails are responsible for many of the clam shells that...

Shark's Eye Neverita duplicata / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 16, 2009 I wish I could say I found this shell, but someone else did and I photographed it. These snails are responsible for many of the clam shells that wash up on the beach with a beveled, round hole in them. The snail drills a hole with its radula, injects an enzyme to digest the clam inside the shell and then it eats the "clam soup". Gastropod means "stomach footed"; these animals have just one shell. 2343
74 I had to laugh when I saw this Florida Fighting Conch emerge from the sand at low tide. It was so comical-looking with its long proboscis and eyestalks.

I had to laugh when I saw this Florida Fighting Conch emerge from the sand at low tide. It was so comical-looking with its long proboscis and eyestalks.

I had to laugh when I saw this Florida Fighting Conch emerge from the sand at low tide. It was so comical-looking with its long proboscis and eyestalks. 1797
75 <strong>Florida Fighting Conch</strong>
<em>Strombus alatus</em> / Gastropod
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 15, 2009

I got out on the beach on Sanibel Island early one morning at low tide and was amazed at the amount of animals that emerged from the san...

Florida Fighting Conch Strombus alatus / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 15, 2009 I got out on the beach on Sanibel Island early one morning at low tide and was amazed at the amount of animals that emerged from the san...

Florida Fighting Conch Strombus alatus / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 15, 2009 I got out on the beach on Sanibel Island early one morning at low tide and was amazed at the amount of animals that emerged from the sandbar. This Florida Fighting Conch had been buried in the sand and came out to feed. I had to laugh when I zoomed in on it with my macro lens and saw the little eyes on the end of the stalks and the long, brown proboscis. The "fighting" part of its name comes from the way the foot thrashes around if the animal gets turned upside down or it it picked up. I never knew a "snail" could move so fast! 2007
76 <strong>Dwarf Olive</strong> (?)
<em>Olivella</em> spp. / Gastropod
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 16, 2009

This is what made the strange convoluted marks in the sand! The little snail was crawling about hunting for tiny morsels to eat for breakfast!

Dwarf Olive (?) Olivella spp. / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 16, 2009 This is what made the strange convoluted marks in the sand! The little snail was crawling about hunting for tiny morsels to eat for breakfast!

Dwarf Olive (?) Olivella spp. / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 16, 2009 This is what made the strange convoluted marks in the sand! The little snail was crawling about hunting for tiny morsels to eat for breakfast! 1825
77 <strong>Dwarf Olive snail trail</strong>

I was fascinated by these strange lines in the sand as I was walking on the beach early one morning. When I investigated more closely, I noticed a tiny Dwarf Olive snail working its way over the sand in searc...

Dwarf Olive snail trail I was fascinated by these strange lines in the sand as I was walking on the beach early one morning. When I investigated more closely, I noticed a tiny Dwarf Olive snail working its way over the sand in searc...

Dwarf Olive snail trail I was fascinated by these strange lines in the sand as I was walking on the beach early one morning. When I investigated more closely, I noticed a tiny Dwarf Olive snail working its way over the sand in search of food. 2110
78 <strong>Lettered Olive</strong> - live animal
<em>Oliva sayana</em> / Gastropod
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 16, 2009

I was delighted to find this Lettered Olive plowing through the sand early one morning at low tide. I was out on the beach before sun...

Lettered Olive - live animal Oliva sayana / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 16, 2009 I was delighted to find this Lettered Olive plowing through the sand early one morning at low tide. I was out on the beach before sun...

Lettered Olive - live animal Oliva sayana / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 16, 2009 I was delighted to find this Lettered Olive plowing through the sand early one morning at low tide. I was out on the beach before sunrise each morning, I was amazed at the number of animals that emerged from the sand to forage for food. I gently pulled this animal out of the sand to get a photo, then I put it back so it could resume hunting for breakfast. The large tan and white-splotched foot, antennae and proboscis is visible. Many people are surprised to learn the "pointed" end of the shell is the back, the open end is the front and the direction the animal moves. The following photo shows the olive snail plowing through the sand. 2585
79 The Lettered Olive plowing through the sand in search of food. Note the long tan proboscis extending from its head. These animals are the "speedsters" of the gastropods, they can move quite rapidly on their single foot!

The Lettered Olive plowing through the sand in search of food. Note the long tan proboscis extending from its head. These animals are the "speedsters" of the gastropods, they can move quite rapidly on their single foot!

The Lettered Olive plowing through the sand in search of food. Note the long tan proboscis extending from its head. These animals are the "speedsters" of the gastropods, they can move quite rapidly on their single foot! 1690
80 <strong>Florida Horse Conch</strong> - live
<em>Triplofusus giganteus</em> / Gastropod
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 18, 2009

On our last day in Sanibel, it was very rainy and windy, so we were unable to do some of the outside activities we had planned...

Florida Horse Conch - live Triplofusus giganteus / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 18, 2009 On our last day in Sanibel, it was very rainy and windy, so we were unable to do some of the outside activities we had planned...

Florida Horse Conch - live Triplofusus giganteus / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 18, 2009 On our last day in Sanibel, it was very rainy and windy, so we were unable to do some of the outside activities we had planned. Plan B was a visit to the Tarpon Bay Education Center, an affiliate of the J. Ding Darling Wildlife Refuge. The center offered a touch tank program on the lower floor of the building. All participants are required to wash their hands prior to handling the animals (they don't do well with bug spray, sunscreen, etc.). I was too busy taking photos to do much handling of the animals, however. This large (up to 19") Florida Horse Conch is one of the local gastropods, it eats other marine snails. It uses its large orange foot to slide across the sandy seafloor. 3341
81 The operculum of a closed Horse conch.

The operculum of a closed Horse conch.

The operculum of a closed Horse conch. 2941
82 I found this small shell of a juvenile Horse conch on the beach at Sanibel Island.

I found this small shell of a juvenile Horse conch on the beach at Sanibel Island.

I found this small shell of a juvenile Horse conch on the beach at Sanibel Island. 1912
83 <strong>Scotch Bonnet</strong>
<em>Phalium granulatum</em> / Gastropod
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 16, 2009

The brown squares on this shell are a good identifying mark.

Scotch Bonnet Phalium granulatum / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 16, 2009 The brown squares on this shell are a good identifying mark.

Scotch Bonnet Phalium granulatum / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 16, 2009 The brown squares on this shell are a good identifying mark. 1682
84 <strong>Common American Auger</strong> (center)
<em>Terebra dislocata</em> / Gastropod
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 15, 2009

This is a common little gastropod on the south Gulf Coast beaches.

Common American Auger (center) Terebra dislocata / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 15, 2009 This is a common little gastropod on the south Gulf Coast beaches.

Common American Auger (center) Terebra dislocata / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 15, 2009 This is a common little gastropod on the south Gulf Coast beaches. 1949
85 <strong>Banded Tulip Shell</strong>
<em>Fasciolaria lilium</em> / Gastropod
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 17, 2009

The Banded Tulip is a <em>gastropod</em>, meaning "stomach-footed". These animals have one shell. Many gastropods are carnivores or scave...

Banded Tulip Shell Fasciolaria lilium / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 17, 2009 The Banded Tulip is a gastropod, meaning "stomach-footed". These animals have one shell. Many gastropods are carnivores or scave...

Banded Tulip Shell Fasciolaria lilium / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 17, 2009 The Banded Tulip is a gastropod, meaning "stomach-footed". These animals have one shell. Many gastropods are carnivores or scavengers, but some are herbivores that eat algae. 2049
86 The foot and flat, brown <em>operculum</em> are visible on this live Banded Tulip snail. The operculum is like a "door" to seal the animal safely into its shell.

The foot and flat, brown operculum are visible on this live Banded Tulip snail. The operculum is like a "door" to seal the animal safely into its shell.

The foot and flat, brown operculum are visible on this live Banded Tulip snail. The operculum is like a "door" to seal the animal safely into its shell. 2510
87 <strong>Atlantic Slippersnail</strong>
<em>Crepidula fornicata</em> / Gastropod
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 16, 2009

These animals have an interesting life! They start out life as males and later become females. If that wasn't strange enough, they al...

Atlantic Slippersnail Crepidula fornicata / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 16, 2009 These animals have an interesting life! They start out life as males and later become females. If that wasn't strange enough, they al...

Atlantic Slippersnail Crepidula fornicata / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 16, 2009 These animals have an interesting life! They start out life as males and later become females. If that wasn't strange enough, they also live in chains, stacked one on top of another, making reproduction even easier (perhaps explaining its "racy" species name!). Slippersnail shells are easy to identify because of the little shelf. 1980
88 <strong>Tuskshell</strong>
<em>Dentalium</em> spp. / Gastropod
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 16, 2009

Finding these little shells was a challenge, they are only up to 1.4 inches. I noticed they were often found in certain areas of the beach; fortunatel...

Tuskshell Dentalium spp. / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 16, 2009 Finding these little shells was a challenge, they are only up to 1.4 inches. I noticed they were often found in certain areas of the beach; fortunatel...

Tuskshell Dentalium spp. / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 16, 2009 Finding these little shells was a challenge, they are only up to 1.4 inches. I noticed they were often found in certain areas of the beach; fortunately, one of those areas was right by our hotel! 2153
89 <strong>Brown-banded Wenteltrap</strong>
<em>Epitonium rupicola</em> / Gastropod
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 16, 2009

This little shell was not much bigger than a grain of rice!

Brown-banded Wenteltrap Epitonium rupicola / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 16, 2009 This little shell was not much bigger than a grain of rice!

Brown-banded Wenteltrap Epitonium rupicola / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 16, 2009 This little shell was not much bigger than a grain of rice! 1931
90 <strong>Humphrey's 
Wenteltrap</strong>
<em>Epitonium humphreysii</em> / Gastropod
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 17, 2009 

I put these tiny shells next to a dime on a mirror to show how minute they are. It was quite a challenge to find them on the beach!

Humphrey's Wenteltrap Epitonium humphreysii / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 17, 2009 I put these tiny shells next to a dime on a mirror to show how minute they are. It was quite a challenge to find them on the beach!

Humphrey's Wenteltrap Epitonium humphreysii / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 17, 2009 I put these tiny shells next to a dime on a mirror to show how minute they are. It was quite a challenge to find them on the beach! 1649
91 <strong>Chestnut Turban</strong>
<em>Turbo castanea</em> / Gastropod
Sanibel Island, FL
No date available
A wonderful lady named Carol, a "snowbird" from Oregon spending the winter on Sanibel Island, gave me this shell. I photographed it on a mirro...

Chestnut Turban Turbo castanea / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL No date available A wonderful lady named Carol, a "snowbird" from Oregon spending the winter on Sanibel Island, gave me this shell. I photographed it on a mirro...

Chestnut Turban Turbo castanea / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL No date available A wonderful lady named Carol, a "snowbird" from Oregon spending the winter on Sanibel Island, gave me this shell. I photographed it on a mirror for an interesting effect. 1473
92 <strong>Lightning Whelk</strong>
<em>Busycon sinistrum</em> / Gastropod
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 18, 2009

Lightning Whelk Busycon sinistrum / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 18, 2009

Lightning Whelk Busycon sinistrum / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 18, 2009 1451
93 <strong>Ribbed Cantharus</strong>
<em>Cantharus multangulus</em>
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 18, 2009

Ribbed Cantharus Cantharus multangulus Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 18, 2009

Ribbed Cantharus Cantharus multangulus Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 18, 2009 1505
94 <strong>Sharp-ribbed Drill</strong>
<em>Eupleura sulcidentata</em> / Gastropod
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 18, 2009

These little shells look as though they have been crudely carved.

Sharp-ribbed Drill Eupleura sulcidentata / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 18, 2009 These little shells look as though they have been crudely carved.

Sharp-ribbed Drill Eupleura sulcidentata / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 18, 2009 These little shells look as though they have been crudely carved. 1427
95 <strong>West Indian Wormshell</strong>
<em>Vermicularia fargoi</em> / Gastropod
Sanibel Island, FL
Dec. 16, 2009

West Indian Wormshell Vermicularia fargoi / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 16, 2009

West Indian Wormshell Vermicularia fargoi / Gastropod Sanibel Island, FL Dec. 16, 2009 1579
96 Waves occur when offshore winds push across the top of the ocean water. On the last 2 days of our stay on Sanibel Island, the wind blew at sustained speeds of 20 miles per hour and gusts up to 30 mph. The waves were quite spectacular, no glassy surface...

Waves occur when offshore winds push across the top of the ocean water. On the last 2 days of our stay on Sanibel Island, the wind blew at sustained speeds of 20 miles per hour and gusts up to 30 mph. The waves were quite spectacular, no glassy surface...

Waves occur when offshore winds push across the top of the ocean water. On the last 2 days of our stay on Sanibel Island, the wind blew at sustained speeds of 20 miles per hour and gusts up to 30 mph. The waves were quite spectacular, no glassy surface was seen on this evening! 1364
97 <strong>Seafoam</strong>

I bought an excellent book from the Shell Museum on Sanibel Island called <em>Florida's Living Beaches</em> by Blair and Dawn Witherington. The book has photos and explanations of things often found on the beach. They explai...

Seafoam I bought an excellent book from the Shell Museum on Sanibel Island called Florida's Living Beaches by Blair and Dawn Witherington. The book has photos and explanations of things often found on the beach. They explai...

Seafoam I bought an excellent book from the Shell Museum on Sanibel Island called Florida's Living Beaches by Blair and Dawn Witherington. The book has photos and explanations of things often found on the beach. They explained that seafoam is caused when microscopic plants and animals (plankton) are broken up by the waves during a storm, their fat eventually is mixed with air and turns into suds. I thought that was very interesting. Although it looks pretty disgusting sometimes, it is harmless! 1541
98 The Shell Museum had "Sailor's Valentines" on display. These spectacular shell crafts were originally made by the wives and sweethearts of sailors while they were on long voyages at sea. The women must have had incredible patience to put such detail in...

The Shell Museum had "Sailor's Valentines" on display. These spectacular shell crafts were originally made by the wives and sweethearts of sailors while they were on long voyages at sea. The women must have had incredible patience to put such detail in...

The Shell Museum had "Sailor's Valentines" on display. These spectacular shell crafts were originally made by the wives and sweethearts of sailors while they were on long voyages at sea. The women must have had incredible patience to put such detail into these beautiful pieces made from nothing but seashells! 1332
99 Another "Sailor's Valentine" at the Bailey - Matthews Shell Museum. The coiled white shells come from a Ramshorn Squid.

Another "Sailor's Valentine" at the Bailey - Matthews Shell Museum. The coiled white shells come from a Ramshorn Squid.

Another "Sailor's Valentine" at the Bailey - Matthews Shell Museum. The coiled white shells come from a Ramshorn Squid. 1517
100 Different parts of the country have different kinds of coastlines. The Big Sur area of the <strong>California</strong> coast has spectacular views of rocky cliffs. This part of the coast has lots of tide pools and kelp forests just off shore. Because o...

Different parts of the country have different kinds of coastlines. The Big Sur area of the California coast has spectacular views of rocky cliffs. This part of the coast has lots of tide pools and kelp forests just off shore. Because o...

Different parts of the country have different kinds of coastlines. The Big Sur area of the California coast has spectacular views of rocky cliffs. This part of the coast has lots of tide pools and kelp forests just off shore. Because of the clockwise currents in the northern Pacific Ocean, the water comes down from Alaska, it is always quite cold. 1775
101 The beach below Bixby Creek Bridge along Highway 1 is a fabulous view.

The beach below Bixby Creek Bridge along Highway 1 is a fabulous view.

The beach below Bixby Creek Bridge along Highway 1 is a fabulous view. 2031
102 On the first morning of the trip Kenny and I woke up at 5:00 due to the 3-hour time difference. We didn't have to meet at my cousin's house until 9:00 AM, so we decided to go to the beach. <strong>Salinas River State Beach</strong> was nearby, we drove...

On the first morning of the trip Kenny and I woke up at 5:00 due to the 3-hour time difference. We didn't have to meet at my cousin's house until 9:00 AM, so we decided to go to the beach. Salinas River State Beach was nearby, we drove...

On the first morning of the trip Kenny and I woke up at 5:00 due to the 3-hour time difference. We didn't have to meet at my cousin's house until 9:00 AM, so we decided to go to the beach. Salinas River State Beach was nearby, we drove there for our first of many visits to the shore. The fog was very thick, but we could still see some shore birds. This Curlew was working the surfline hunting for crabs and other crustaceans. 1405
103 I photographed this <strong>Long-billed Curlew</strong> (<em>Numenius americanus</em>) eating crabs in the sand at the Moss Landing Marina. Curlews use their long, thin beaks to extract crabs from the sand.

I photographed this Long-billed Curlew (Numenius americanus) eating crabs in the sand at the Moss Landing Marina. Curlews use their long, thin beaks to extract crabs from the sand.

I photographed this Long-billed Curlew (Numenius americanus) eating crabs in the sand at the Moss Landing Marina. Curlews use their long, thin beaks to extract crabs from the sand. 1663
104 This large frond of <strong>Bull Kelp</strong> (<em>Nereocystis luetkeana</em>) had washed up on the beach. The round, hollow end of the frond keeps the end of the kelp frond near the surface. I was surprised to learn that 10% of the gas in the float i...

This large frond of Bull Kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana) had washed up on the beach. The round, hollow end of the frond keeps the end of the kelp frond near the surface. I was surprised to learn that 10% of the gas in the float i...

This large frond of Bull Kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana) had washed up on the beach. The round, hollow end of the frond keeps the end of the kelp frond near the surface. I was surprised to learn that 10% of the gas in the float is comprised of carbon monoxide! The root-like holdfasts anchor the fronds to the rocks. Kelp (and other seaweeds) is not a plant, it is a type of brown algae in the Kingdom Protista. Some types of kelp contain chemicals such as carrageenan and algin, many people would be amazed to know that a lot of the foods they eat and their toothpaste contain these chemicals! Kudzu, the "vine that ate the South", has nothing on this kelp, it can grow up to 10 inches a day! It grows up to 115 feet long. According to the Monterey Bay Aquarium's website, the genus name, Nereocystis means "mermaid's bladder"! Who says taxonomists (people who name organisms) don't have a sense of humor! :) 1660
105 Fronds and a holdfast of giant kelp. This was a large wad of seaweed that had washed up on the beach.

Fronds and a holdfast of giant kelp. This was a large wad of seaweed that had washed up on the beach.

Fronds and a holdfast of giant kelp. This was a large wad of seaweed that had washed up on the beach. 1752
106 <strong>Beach Hopper</strong>
<em>Orchestia</em> or <em>Orchestoidea</em> spp.
Castroville, CA

When I picked up a bunch of washed up seaweed hundreds of these little creatures hopped around until they could bury in the sand. They hide under the se...

Beach Hopper Orchestia or Orchestoidea spp. Castroville, CA When I picked up a bunch of washed up seaweed hundreds of these little creatures hopped around until they could bury in the sand. They hide under the se...

Beach Hopper Orchestia or Orchestoidea spp. Castroville, CA When I picked up a bunch of washed up seaweed hundreds of these little creatures hopped around until they could bury in the sand. They hide under the seaweed to keep from drying out in the hot sun. This one was large as Beach Hoppers go, about 1 inch long. 2108
107 <strong>American Avocets</strong> (<em>Recurvirostrata americana</em>) are another common shorebird on the Pacific Coast, these were resting in a shallow slough in the Salinas River near the beach. The beaks of Avocets curve up, Curlews beaks curve down.

American Avocets (Recurvirostrata americana) are another common shorebird on the Pacific Coast, these were resting in a shallow slough in the Salinas River near the beach. The beaks of Avocets curve up, Curlews beaks curve down.

American Avocets (Recurvirostrata americana) are another common shorebird on the Pacific Coast, these were resting in a shallow slough in the Salinas River near the beach. The beaks of Avocets curve up, Curlews beaks curve down. 1693
108 It is uncommon to find whole <strong>Pacific Sand Dollar</strong> (<em>Dendraster excentricus</em>)
   shells, called <em>tests</em>, washed up on the beach, so we were amazed to see many of them in one area. This is a <u>true</u> Sand Dollar, it does...

It is uncommon to find whole Pacific Sand Dollar (Dendraster excentricus) shells, called tests, washed up on the beach, so we were amazed to see many of them in one area. This is a true Sand Dollar, it does...

It is uncommon to find whole Pacific Sand Dollar (Dendraster excentricus) shells, called tests, washed up on the beach, so we were amazed to see many of them in one area. This is a true Sand Dollar, it does not have the 5 holes found in Key Hole Urchins. These echinoderms are related to sea urchins, sea cucumbers, and sea stars (a.k.a. "starfish"). The "doves" found in the inside of sand dollars are actually their "teeth"! Inside the living animal, they are arranged in the shape of a star in an organ called "Aristotle's Lantern". The live animals have a grayish-brown fuzz on the outside of the shell. The "flower" shape on the top of the test where the animals breathes. The little lines (channels) on the under side of the test funnel to a hole in the center, the mouth. Tiny feet move small pieces of food along these channels to the mouth. A second, smaller hole at the edge of the shell is the anus. The living animals should never be collected and removed from the water, dead urchins stink! I've seen stacks of dead urchins left on picnic tables at eastern beaches because parents wouldn't let their kids take them. I don't buy shells from shell shops, most likely the animals were taken from the ocean alive and then killed, "perfect" seashells are seldom found on the beach. 2202
109 The first morning that we walked on the beach we were excited to see these Sea Turtle tracks. We had arrived at low tide, it was obvious that the turtle had come out of the ocean during the night and returned to the water at low tide because there was ...

The first morning that we walked on the beach we were excited to see these Sea Turtle tracks. We had arrived at low tide, it was obvious that the turtle had come out of the ocean during the night and returned to the water at low tide because there was ...

The first morning that we walked on the beach we were excited to see these Sea Turtle tracks. We had arrived at low tide, it was obvious that the turtle had come out of the ocean during the night and returned to the water at low tide because there was just one set of tracks. Hopefully, the eggs will be unmolested by raccoons and other animals and in a couple of months the tiny hatchlings will make a mad nighttime dash to the ocean. 1417
110 The sand dunes along the California beaches are important barriers. Plants are essential for dunes, without them the dunes would blow away in the constant coastal breezes or wash away during strong storms. It is crucial for people to stay off the dunes...

The sand dunes along the California beaches are important barriers. Plants are essential for dunes, without them the dunes would blow away in the constant coastal breezes or wash away during strong storms. It is crucial for people to stay off the dunes...

The sand dunes along the California beaches are important barriers. Plants are essential for dunes, without them the dunes would blow away in the constant coastal breezes or wash away during strong storms. It is crucial for people to stay off the dunes to protect the plants, hundreds of footsteps will trample the roots and kill them. No plants, no dunes! 1697
111 Coast Indian Paintbrush adds a splash of bright color to the subdued dunes.

Coast Indian Paintbrush adds a splash of bright color to the subdued dunes.

Coast Indian Paintbrush adds a splash of bright color to the subdued dunes. 1674
112 We saw these <strong>Harbor Seals</strong> across the inlet of the marina at Moss Landing on another of our early morning beach excursions. It was fun to watch the seals slide into the water and then flop back up on the beach. Seals can often be heard ...

We saw these Harbor Seals across the inlet of the marina at Moss Landing on another of our early morning beach excursions. It was fun to watch the seals slide into the water and then flop back up on the beach. Seals can often be heard ...

We saw these Harbor Seals across the inlet of the marina at Moss Landing on another of our early morning beach excursions. It was fun to watch the seals slide into the water and then flop back up on the beach. Seals can often be heard or smelled before they are seen! There are differences between seals and sea lions --- seals have external ear flaps and they flop along when they exit the water; sea lions are the "circus seals", they have no external earflaps and they use their front flippers to get around out of the water. 1505
113 This was one of my favorite photos of the trip! I was literally walking up to my waist in wildflowers at this stop along Hwy. 1!

This was one of my favorite photos of the trip! I was literally walking up to my waist in wildflowers at this stop along Hwy. 1!

This was one of my favorite photos of the trip! I was literally walking up to my waist in wildflowers at this stop along Hwy. 1! 1743
114 This <strong>Green Anemone</strong> (<em>Anthopleura xanthogrammica</em>) has its tentacles open. It was found in a tide pool. Anemones are related to jellyfish, corals, and freshwater hydras, like them, they have stingers called "nematocysts" in their...

This Green Anemone (Anthopleura xanthogrammica) has its tentacles open. It was found in a tide pool. Anemones are related to jellyfish, corals, and freshwater hydras, like them, they have stingers called "nematocysts" in their...

This Green Anemone (Anthopleura xanthogrammica) has its tentacles open. It was found in a tide pool. Anemones are related to jellyfish, corals, and freshwater hydras, like them, they have stingers called "nematocysts" in their tentacles for catching fish. 1691
115 When the tide goes out the anemone pulls its tentacles in and awaits the rising water. They are well-camoflaged in this state. Sea anemones feel "sticky" due to the nematocysts.

When the tide goes out the anemone pulls its tentacles in and awaits the rising water. They are well-camoflaged in this state. Sea anemones feel "sticky" due to the nematocysts.

When the tide goes out the anemone pulls its tentacles in and awaits the rising water. They are well-camoflaged in this state. Sea anemones feel "sticky" due to the nematocysts. 1816
116 <strong>Acorn Barnacles</strong> (<em>Semibalanus balanoides</em>) are arthropods that attach themselves to rocks, shells, pilings, and even whales and sea turtles. When they are submersed, they reach out for zooplankton with tiny arms.

Acorn Barnacles (Semibalanus balanoides) are arthropods that attach themselves to rocks, shells, pilings, and even whales and sea turtles. When they are submersed, they reach out for zooplankton with tiny arms.

Acorn Barnacles (Semibalanus balanoides) are arthropods that attach themselves to rocks, shells, pilings, and even whales and sea turtles. When they are submersed, they reach out for zooplankton with tiny arms. 1686
117 The <strong>Hole-in-the-Rock</strong> is an interesting formation at Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Park. We enjoyed watching the waves crash through the large rectangular hole. Over time, it will get larger and larger and the large rock will become two.
...

The Hole-in-the-Rock is an interesting formation at Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Park. We enjoyed watching the waves crash through the large rectangular hole. Over time, it will get larger and larger and the large rock will become two. ...

The Hole-in-the-Rock is an interesting formation at Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Park. We enjoyed watching the waves crash through the large rectangular hole. Over time, it will get larger and larger and the large rock will become two. map... 1660
118 Ken enjoyed looking for creatures in the tidepools at Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Beach. We had to watch where we walked so we could avoid stepping on the fragile animals.

Ken enjoyed looking for creatures in the tidepools at Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Beach. We had to watch where we walked so we could avoid stepping on the fragile animals.

Ken enjoyed looking for creatures in the tidepools at Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Beach. We had to watch where we walked so we could avoid stepping on the fragile animals. 1636
119 <strong>Large-flowered or Sticky Sand Spurrey</strong>
<em>Spergularia macrotheca</em> / Pink Family
June 26, 2006<br>
I found these pretty flowers blooming on a cliff at Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Beach. These flowers are much bigger than most othe...

Large-flowered or Sticky Sand Spurrey Spergularia macrotheca / Pink Family June 26, 2006
I found these pretty flowers blooming on a cliff at Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Beach. These flowers are much bigger than most othe...

Large-flowered or Sticky Sand Spurrey Spergularia macrotheca / Pink Family June 26, 2006
I found these pretty flowers blooming on a cliff at Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Beach. These flowers are much bigger than most other sand spurreys.
1847
120 <strong>Limpets</strong> are molluscs that live on rocks. They graze on algae. These animals move slowly, so they have to be able to clamp down on the rocks during low tide. The shells have a single hole in the top, making them look like tiny volcanoes.

Limpets are molluscs that live on rocks. They graze on algae. These animals move slowly, so they have to be able to clamp down on the rocks during low tide. The shells have a single hole in the top, making them look like tiny volcanoes.

Limpets are molluscs that live on rocks. They graze on algae. These animals move slowly, so they have to be able to clamp down on the rocks during low tide. The shells have a single hole in the top, making them look like tiny volcanoes. 1673
121 We thought it was interesting how this Sea Palm had attached its holdfast to a Blue Mussel! It had washed up on the beach. Most solid substrates in the low tide zone have some type of organism living on them, even organisms can have something living on...

We thought it was interesting how this Sea Palm had attached its holdfast to a Blue Mussel! It had washed up on the beach. Most solid substrates in the low tide zone have some type of organism living on them, even organisms can have something living on...

We thought it was interesting how this Sea Palm had attached its holdfast to a Blue Mussel! It had washed up on the beach. Most solid substrates in the low tide zone have some type of organism living on them, even organisms can have something living on them! 1477
122 We were amazed to see this Purple sand on the beach at Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Beach. We traced it to purple-colored rocks in the cliffs at the surf line.

We were amazed to see this Purple sand on the beach at Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Beach. We traced it to purple-colored rocks in the cliffs at the surf line.

We were amazed to see this Purple sand on the beach at Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Beach. We traced it to purple-colored rocks in the cliffs at the surf line. 1576
123 My cousin Sam, from New Mexico, is holding a clump of orange <strong>tunicates</strong> that I had found on the beach. It was growing on a clump of sea grass. Tunicates are a colonial animal that feed by filtering water through little pores.

My cousin Sam, from New Mexico, is holding a clump of orange tunicates that I had found on the beach. It was growing on a clump of sea grass. Tunicates are a colonial animal that feed by filtering water through little pores.

My cousin Sam, from New Mexico, is holding a clump of orange tunicates that I had found on the beach. It was growing on a clump of sea grass. Tunicates are a colonial animal that feed by filtering water through little pores. 1628
124 Close-up of the orange tunicates on seagrass.

Close-up of the orange tunicates on seagrass.

Close-up of the orange tunicates on seagrass. 1673
125 <strong>Sea Palms</strong>
<em>Postelsia palmaeformis</em><br>
These brown algae grow on rocks near the shoreline. It is possible to see them exposed at low tide. They look like small brown trees growing on the rocks.

Sea Palms Postelsia palmaeformis
These brown algae grow on rocks near the shoreline. It is possible to see them exposed at low tide. They look like small brown trees growing on the rocks.

Sea Palms Postelsia palmaeformis
These brown algae grow on rocks near the shoreline. It is possible to see them exposed at low tide. They look like small brown trees growing on the rocks.
1790
126 Multi-colored Seaweeds at low tide

Multi-colored Seaweeds at low tide

Multi-colored Seaweeds at low tide 1592
127 We didn't stay at Pebble Beach for long because we wanted to go to Pt. Lobos State Preserve. At $9.00 for the entrance fee, we barely got our money's worth, since we could only stay for about an hour. However, gorgeous views like this one made it worth...

We didn't stay at Pebble Beach for long because we wanted to go to Pt. Lobos State Preserve. At $9.00 for the entrance fee, we barely got our money's worth, since we could only stay for about an hour. However, gorgeous views like this one made it worth...

We didn't stay at Pebble Beach for long because we wanted to go to Pt. Lobos State Preserve. At $9.00 for the entrance fee, we barely got our money's worth, since we could only stay for about an hour. However, gorgeous views like this one made it worth the fee! map... 1409
128 Seaweed, like this giant kelp, grows very close to the shore. Scuba divers can get permits to dive here. It would be fascinating to dive in a place to see the fish, algae, and other organisms.

Seaweed, like this giant kelp, grows very close to the shore. Scuba divers can get permits to dive here. It would be fascinating to dive in a place to see the fish, algae, and other organisms.

Seaweed, like this giant kelp, grows very close to the shore. Scuba divers can get permits to dive here. It would be fascinating to dive in a place to see the fish, algae, and other organisms. 1592
129 We enjoyed watching this harbor seal as it swam around the rock. Another seal was sleeping on top of the rock. They are quite well camoflaged, so they can be a challenge to see.

We enjoyed watching this harbor seal as it swam around the rock. Another seal was sleeping on top of the rock. They are quite well camoflaged, so they can be a challenge to see.

We enjoyed watching this harbor seal as it swam around the rock. Another seal was sleeping on top of the rock. They are quite well camoflaged, so they can be a challenge to see. 1545
130 This <strong>Harbor Seal</strong> (<em>Phoca vitulina</em>) was resting on the large rock below the cliffs of Pt. Lobos. The name of the preserve comes from the seals which are known as "Wolves of the Sea", "Lobos" means wolf in Spanish.

This Harbor Seal (Phoca vitulina) was resting on the large rock below the cliffs of Pt. Lobos. The name of the preserve comes from the seals which are known as "Wolves of the Sea", "Lobos" means wolf in Spanish.

This Harbor Seal (Phoca vitulina) was resting on the large rock below the cliffs of Pt. Lobos. The name of the preserve comes from the seals which are known as "Wolves of the Sea", "Lobos" means wolf in Spanish. 1666
131 These Harbor Seals were hauled out on the rocks off the point. We counted a total of 32 seals on the rocks.

These Harbor Seals were hauled out on the rocks off the point. We counted a total of 32 seals on the rocks.

These Harbor Seals were hauled out on the rocks off the point. We counted a total of 32 seals on the rocks. 1559
132 I enjoyed seeing the varied colors of the beach rocks.

I enjoyed seeing the varied colors of the beach rocks.

I enjoyed seeing the varied colors of the beach rocks. 1974
133 <strong>Ochre Sea stars</strong>
<em>Pisaster ochraceus</em>
The correct name for these 5-armed echinoderms is <em>sea star</em>, not "starfish" since they are not related to fish in any way. Sea stars are often left exposed on the rocks and pier pil...

Ochre Sea stars Pisaster ochraceus The correct name for these 5-armed echinoderms is sea star, not "starfish" since they are not related to fish in any way. Sea stars are often left exposed on the rocks and pier pil...

Ochre Sea stars Pisaster ochraceus The correct name for these 5-armed echinoderms is sea star, not "starfish" since they are not related to fish in any way. Sea stars are often left exposed on the rocks and pier pilings during low tide; Sea stars breathe through their skin, as long as they stay wet from the spray they can survive until the next high tide. Some of these sea stars are orange and others are purple. 1635
134 <strong>Ochre Sea Star</strong>
<em>Pisaster ochraceus</em>
Sea Stars are related to sea urchins, sea cucumbers, and sand dollars, they are echinoderms, meaning "spiny skinned". They move about on tiny tube feet and they have to breathe through their...

Ochre Sea Star Pisaster ochraceus Sea Stars are related to sea urchins, sea cucumbers, and sand dollars, they are echinoderms, meaning "spiny skinned". They move about on tiny tube feet and they have to breathe through their...

Ochre Sea Star Pisaster ochraceus Sea Stars are related to sea urchins, sea cucumbers, and sand dollars, they are echinoderms, meaning "spiny skinned". They move about on tiny tube feet and they have to breathe through their skin. Sea Stars eat mussels, scallops, clams and other mollusks by grasping the shells and slowly pulling them apart. When they get a small opening between the shells, the sea star pushes its stomach out of its' mouth and into the mollusk. The stomach digests the animal out of the shell, leaving just the empty shells behind. Sea stars can regenerate lost body parts. If one loses a leg, it will grow another. Sometimes a lost leg may even grow a new sea star! 1988
135 It may have been a crazy thing to do, but we went to the beach anyway despite the 50 mph sustained winds. It turned out to be a lot of fun, we were the only people on the beach and we could lean into the wind without falling down!

It may have been a crazy thing to do, but we went to the beach anyway despite the 50 mph sustained winds. It turned out to be a lot of fun, we were the only people on the beach and we could lean into the wind without falling down!

It may have been a crazy thing to do, but we went to the beach anyway despite the 50 mph sustained winds. It turned out to be a lot of fun, we were the only people on the beach and we could lean into the wind without falling down! 1662
136 We were delighted to come upon this wonderful tide pool when we went to the beach in Malibu. We found hermit crabs, sea anemones, and I found this huge sea urchin.  When I got back to school in TN the following week, I was telling some of the teachers ...

We were delighted to come upon this wonderful tide pool when we went to the beach in Malibu. We found hermit crabs, sea anemones, and I found this huge sea urchin. When I got back to school in TN the following week, I was telling some of the teachers ...

We were delighted to come upon this wonderful tide pool when we went to the beach in Malibu. We found hermit crabs, sea anemones, and I found this huge sea urchin. When I got back to school in TN the following week, I was telling some of the teachers about my trip. When I mentioned that we went to Malibu, one of the teachers excitedly asked if I saw any of the movie stars homes. I answered, "Uh, no, we went to a tide pool!" She said, "Kris, you do exactly what I would NOT do on my vacation!" :) I'll take a good tide pool over a movie star's home any time! 1583
137 <strong>Giant Red Sea Urchin</strong>
<em>Strongylocentrotus franciscanus</em>
Malibu, CA
March 28, 2007
Sea Urchins are <em>echinoderms</em> and are related to sea stars. They move on tiny tube feet. Their mouth is in the center of the lower part ...

Giant Red Sea Urchin Strongylocentrotus franciscanus Malibu, CA March 28, 2007 Sea Urchins are echinoderms and are related to sea stars. They move on tiny tube feet. Their mouth is in the center of the lower part ...

Giant Red Sea Urchin Strongylocentrotus franciscanus Malibu, CA March 28, 2007 Sea Urchins are echinoderms and are related to sea stars. They move on tiny tube feet. Their mouth is in the center of the lower part of their body. Sea urchins eat seaweeds, if their numbers are not kept in check by sea otters and other animals, they can do a lot of damage to the kelp forests. The spines on the upper part of the sea urchin's shell are moveable. As I was photographing it, I heard Kenny yell, "Come here and look at this big snail!" (see next photo) 1723
138 <strong>Sea Hare</strong>
<em>Aplysia californica</em> 
Malibu, CA
March 28, 2007
Kenny first saw this Sea Hare as we walked along the rocks at the beach in Malibu. We were so lucky to get there at low tide so we could see these strange mollusks, s...

Sea Hare Aplysia californica Malibu, CA March 28, 2007 Kenny first saw this Sea Hare as we walked along the rocks at the beach in Malibu. We were so lucky to get there at low tide so we could see these strange mollusks, s...

Sea Hare Aplysia californica Malibu, CA March 28, 2007 Kenny first saw this Sea Hare as we walked along the rocks at the beach in Malibu. We were so lucky to get there at low tide so we could see these strange mollusks, sea anemones, hermit crabs, chitons, and limpets. Sea hares are herbivores, they eat seaweeds. It is interesting that they eat only seaweeds that are the same color as their bodies. Talk about picky eaters! They have poisonous skin that deters predators such as sea anemones. They can also produce an ink if disturbed, like their relatives the squid and octopus. 1624
139 <strong>Willet</strong>
<em>Catoptrophorus semipalmatus</em>
These birds are fun to watch as they run in the surf and poke around in the rocks as they search for food. Their long legs and long beak enable them to move easily among the rocks and in th...

Willet Catoptrophorus semipalmatus These birds are fun to watch as they run in the surf and poke around in the rocks as they search for food. Their long legs and long beak enable them to move easily among the rocks and in th...

Willet Catoptrophorus semipalmatus These birds are fun to watch as they run in the surf and poke around in the rocks as they search for food. Their long legs and long beak enable them to move easily among the rocks and in the surf to find small animals to eat. 1646
140 The <strong>Pt. Loma Tide Pool</strong> is located below the cliffs. It was so trampled by numerous visitors, we didn't see as many animals as we had in Malibu.

The Pt. Loma Tide Pool is located below the cliffs. It was so trampled by numerous visitors, we didn't see as many animals as we had in Malibu.

The Pt. Loma Tide Pool is located below the cliffs. It was so trampled by numerous visitors, we didn't see as many animals as we had in Malibu. 1588
141 <strong>Goose Barnacles</strong> and Mussels
<em>Lepas</em> sp. 
Goose barnacles grow on a stalk (like a goose neck). They are exposed to the air for a few hours during low tide. They close their shells tightly until the water rises again. Barnacles ...

Goose Barnacles and Mussels Lepas sp. Goose barnacles grow on a stalk (like a goose neck). They are exposed to the air for a few hours during low tide. They close their shells tightly until the water rises again. Barnacles ...

Goose Barnacles and Mussels Lepas sp. Goose barnacles grow on a stalk (like a goose neck). They are exposed to the air for a few hours during low tide. They close their shells tightly until the water rises again. Barnacles are filter feeders, they extend 5 "fingers" which they wave in the water to catch small animals. Note the small barnacles growing on the mussel shells, no space is wasted in a tide pool! 2102
142 <strong>Piddock Clam</strong>
<em>Penitella penita</em>
These Rock-burrowing mollusks have a shell with a rough set of ridges that they use to grind holes in solid rock, a pretty good way to protect themselves! Clams are filter feeders. These animals...

Piddock Clam Penitella penita These Rock-burrowing mollusks have a shell with a rough set of ridges that they use to grind holes in solid rock, a pretty good way to protect themselves! Clams are filter feeders. These animals...

Piddock Clam Penitella penita These Rock-burrowing mollusks have a shell with a rough set of ridges that they use to grind holes in solid rock, a pretty good way to protect themselves! Clams are filter feeders. These animals can live in the rocks up to 8 years. When they die, they leave an empty hole that can be used by crabs, sea anemones and other animals (called "metabiosis". 4455
143 These <strong>Limpets </strong> scour holes in the sandstone to secure a home for themselves.
<em></em>

These Limpets scour holes in the sandstone to secure a home for themselves.

These Limpets scour holes in the sandstone to secure a home for themselves. 1656
144 These Anemones found the old limpet holes to be a great home. They were safe from the hundreds of trampling feet of the tourists. These anemones stick small rocks, shells, and pieces of seaweed on the outside of their bodies to protect themselves. They...

These Anemones found the old limpet holes to be a great home. They were safe from the hundreds of trampling feet of the tourists. These anemones stick small rocks, shells, and pieces of seaweed on the outside of their bodies to protect themselves. They...

These Anemones found the old limpet holes to be a great home. They were safe from the hundreds of trampling feet of the tourists. These anemones stick small rocks, shells, and pieces of seaweed on the outside of their bodies to protect themselves. They close up when the tide goes out and they are exposed to the air. 1421
145 <strong>Solitary Green Anemone</strong>
<em>Anthopleura sola</em>
Sometimes it is hard to get out of the "teacher mode" when I am away from school, I had to bite my tongue to keep from saying something when I saw a middle school-aged girl poke her fi...

Solitary Green Anemone Anthopleura sola Sometimes it is hard to get out of the "teacher mode" when I am away from school, I had to bite my tongue to keep from saying something when I saw a middle school-aged girl poke her fi...

Solitary Green Anemone Anthopleura sola Sometimes it is hard to get out of the "teacher mode" when I am away from school, I had to bite my tongue to keep from saying something when I saw a middle school-aged girl poke her finger into the middle of an anemone like this one. I thought to myself, "Too bad it doesn't have teeth so it could bite her!" 1455
146 <strong>California Horn snail</strong>
<em>Cerithidea californica</em>

These snails were quite numerous in the mudflats at the Palo Alto Baylands. I was surprised to see how quickly they could move. Their mouth is located in the long black tube nea...

California Horn snail Cerithidea californica These snails were quite numerous in the mudflats at the Palo Alto Baylands. I was surprised to see how quickly they could move. Their mouth is located in the long black tube nea...

California Horn snail Cerithidea californica These snails were quite numerous in the mudflats at the Palo Alto Baylands. I was surprised to see how quickly they could move. Their mouth is located in the long black tube near the opening of the shell. These snails are the first of three steps in the life cycle of several species of parasitic trematode worms. The snails are eaten by fish, which are then eaten by birds, where the worms lay their eggs, birds excrete the eggs into the water to be ingested by the snails, and cycle is then completed. 1773
147 A California Horn snail at low tide leaves a track in the mud as it searches for food.

A California Horn snail at low tide leaves a track in the mud as it searches for food.

A California Horn snail at low tide leaves a track in the mud as it searches for food. 1735
148 A fog bank off the central California coast.

A fog bank off the central California coast.

A fog bank off the central California coast. 1412
149 The <strong>Natural Bridge</strong> (the namesake of the park) in the surf. Constant pounding from the surf has eroded a hole through the rock to form the bridge. The rock is home to lots of gulls and cormorants. The white stuff on the top of the rock ...

The Natural Bridge (the namesake of the park) in the surf. Constant pounding from the surf has eroded a hole through the rock to form the bridge. The rock is home to lots of gulls and cormorants. The white stuff on the top of the rock ...

The Natural Bridge (the namesake of the park) in the surf. Constant pounding from the surf has eroded a hole through the rock to form the bridge. The rock is home to lots of gulls and cormorants. The white stuff on the top of the rock is not snow!;) map... 1163
150 Our daughter-in-law, Jeanie, gets a surprise when she walks into the 50 degree F surf! The water of the Pacific is uncomfortably cold along most of California's coast due to the frigid Alaska current.

Our daughter-in-law, Jeanie, gets a surprise when she walks into the 50 degree F surf! The water of the Pacific is uncomfortably cold along most of California's coast due to the frigid Alaska current.

Our daughter-in-law, Jeanie, gets a surprise when she walks into the 50 degree F surf! The water of the Pacific is uncomfortably cold along most of California's coast due to the frigid Alaska current. 1235
151 Every trip has a "favorite photo", this is the one from our 2008 trip! I like the waves breaking on the rocks, the birds, and the gazebo at Natural Bridges SP. The people living on the cliff above the rock beach have a fabulous view!

Every trip has a "favorite photo", this is the one from our 2008 trip! I like the waves breaking on the rocks, the birds, and the gazebo at Natural Bridges SP. The people living on the cliff above the rock beach have a fabulous view!

Every trip has a "favorite photo", this is the one from our 2008 trip! I like the waves breaking on the rocks, the birds, and the gazebo at Natural Bridges SP. The people living on the cliff above the rock beach have a fabulous view! 1274
152 I love to watch the power of waves as they crash on the rocks along the California coast. This was on a day when the water was quite calm, I can't imagine what the waves generated by winter storms must be like!

I love to watch the power of waves as they crash on the rocks along the California coast. This was on a day when the water was quite calm, I can't imagine what the waves generated by winter storms must be like!

I love to watch the power of waves as they crash on the rocks along the California coast. This was on a day when the water was quite calm, I can't imagine what the waves generated by winter storms must be like! 1296
153 <strong>Aggregating Anemone</strong>
<em>Anthopleura elegantissima</em>
Santa Cruz, CA
July 6, 2008

These small anemones can become large colonies by splitting and cloning themselves. These were photographed in a tiny tide pool at Natural Bridges...

Aggregating Anemone Anthopleura elegantissima Santa Cruz, CA July 6, 2008 These small anemones can become large colonies by splitting and cloning themselves. These were photographed in a tiny tide pool at Natural Bridges...

Aggregating Anemone Anthopleura elegantissima Santa Cruz, CA July 6, 2008 These small anemones can become large colonies by splitting and cloning themselves. These were photographed in a tiny tide pool at Natural Bridges SP. During low tide the anemones pull in their tentacles and look much like mushy rocks. They often have pieces of broken seashells and sand attached to their top side. 1556
154 <strong>Pacific Harbor Seal</strong>
<em>Phoca vitulina richardsi</em>
Santa Cruz, CA
July 6, 2008

Seals don't have the external earflaps that California Sealions have. They have a more rounded snout too.

Pacific Harbor Seal Phoca vitulina richardsi Santa Cruz, CA July 6, 2008 Seals don't have the external earflaps that California Sealions have. They have a more rounded snout too.

Pacific Harbor Seal Phoca vitulina richardsi Santa Cruz, CA July 6, 2008 Seals don't have the external earflaps that California Sealions have. They have a more rounded snout too. 1304
155 A Giant Kelp frond I saw floating in Monterey Bay from the Santa Cruz pier. The air bladders help the kelp float.

A Giant Kelp frond I saw floating in Monterey Bay from the Santa Cruz pier. The air bladders help the kelp float.

A Giant Kelp frond I saw floating in Monterey Bay from the Santa Cruz pier. The air bladders help the kelp float. 1357
156 We enjoyed watching this Sea Otter as it dived and ate on the surface. I noticed it would pop up and look around before diving. Otters wrap up in the kelp fronds at night to keep from drifting away.

We enjoyed watching this Sea Otter as it dived and ate on the surface. I noticed it would pop up and look around before diving. Otters wrap up in the kelp fronds at night to keep from drifting away.

We enjoyed watching this Sea Otter as it dived and ate on the surface. I noticed it would pop up and look around before diving. Otters wrap up in the kelp fronds at night to keep from drifting away. 1394
157 Santa Cruz beach on a busy July 4th weekend!

Santa Cruz beach on a busy July 4th weekend!

Santa Cruz beach on a busy July 4th weekend! 1462
158 <strong>California Sea Lion</strong>
<em>Zalophus californianus</em>
Santa Cruz, CA
July 6, 2008

A California Sealion swims in Monterey Bay near the Santa Cruz pier. The tiny ear flap is just visible in the water behind the seal's eye. These high...

California Sea Lion Zalophus californianus Santa Cruz, CA July 6, 2008 A California Sealion swims in Monterey Bay near the Santa Cruz pier. The tiny ear flap is just visible in the water behind the seal's eye. These high...

California Sea Lion Zalophus californianus Santa Cruz, CA July 6, 2008 A California Sealion swims in Monterey Bay near the Santa Cruz pier. The tiny ear flap is just visible in the water behind the seal's eye. These highly intelligent sealions have been trained by the US Navy and as "Circus seals". 1472
159 Our son and his girfriend, Jeanie, flew to Seattle on Thursday night and the next day we drove to Anacortes, WA. We met the ferry and Jeanie's parents in Anacortes. While we waited for the ferry the tide was dropping, so we entertained ourselves lookin...

Our son and his girfriend, Jeanie, flew to Seattle on Thursday night and the next day we drove to Anacortes, WA. We met the ferry and Jeanie's parents in Anacortes. While we waited for the ferry the tide was dropping, so we entertained ourselves lookin...

Our son and his girfriend, Jeanie, flew to Seattle on Thursday night and the next day we drove to Anacortes, WA. We met the ferry and Jeanie's parents in Anacortes. While we waited for the ferry the tide was dropping, so we entertained ourselves looking at the little crabs that scuttled out from under the rocks. Crabs are scavengers, they hunt for food on the beach. They in turn, are also eaten by other animals. 1009
160 Curtis found this little crab among the rocks on the beach. One of the nice things about liking nature is you can be entertained just about anywhere outside! :)

Curtis found this little crab among the rocks on the beach. One of the nice things about liking nature is you can be entertained just about anywhere outside! :)

Curtis found this little crab among the rocks on the beach. One of the nice things about liking nature is you can be entertained just about anywhere outside! :) 1214
161 <strong>Beach Hopper </strong>

These little creatures are very difficult to photograph because they are constantly jumping! I managed to shoot this one on a rock before it somersaulted off.

Beach Hopper These little creatures are very difficult to photograph because they are constantly jumping! I managed to shoot this one on a rock before it somersaulted off.

Beach Hopper These little creatures are very difficult to photograph because they are constantly jumping! I managed to shoot this one on a rock before it somersaulted off. 1281
162 These Beach hoppers were scavenging on sea lettuce at West Beach Resort, this was one of the few times they stayed still!

These Beach hoppers were scavenging on sea lettuce at West Beach Resort, this was one of the few times they stayed still!

These Beach hoppers were scavenging on sea lettuce at West Beach Resort, this was one of the few times they stayed still! 1264
163 A marine Isopod is a saltwater version of a roly poly.

A marine Isopod is a saltwater version of a roly poly.

A marine Isopod is a saltwater version of a roly poly. 1696
164 There were many of these purple Clam shells on the beach at low tide in the morning. My guess is they were probably eaten during the night by skates.

There were many of these purple Clam shells on the beach at low tide in the morning. My guess is they were probably eaten during the night by skates.

There were many of these purple Clam shells on the beach at low tide in the morning. My guess is they were probably eaten during the night by skates. 1730
165 <strong>Dungeness Crab</strong>
<em>Cancer magister</em>
Orcas Island, WA
June 20, 2009

I found this crab on the beach at low tide, for some reason it had not survived the night. There were lots of these crabs on ice at the Public Market in Seatt...

Dungeness Crab Cancer magister Orcas Island, WA June 20, 2009 I found this crab on the beach at low tide, for some reason it had not survived the night. There were lots of these crabs on ice at the Public Market in Seatt...

Dungeness Crab Cancer magister Orcas Island, WA June 20, 2009 I found this crab on the beach at low tide, for some reason it had not survived the night. There were lots of these crabs on ice at the Public Market in Seattle. Crabs are scavengers that eat dead fish and other marine organisms. This crab has barnacles on its carapace. 1139
166 An assortment of Seaweed was left on the beach overnight, stranded at low tide.

An assortment of Seaweed was left on the beach overnight, stranded at low tide.

An assortment of Seaweed was left on the beach overnight, stranded at low tide. 1345
167 I found this huge sheet of seaweed, called <strong>Sea Lettuce</strong>, floating in the bay. I've read that this is edible, but I wasn't interested in munching on it! The long tube floating in the water next to the kayak is a loose frond of Bull Kelp....

I found this huge sheet of seaweed, called Sea Lettuce, floating in the bay. I've read that this is edible, but I wasn't interested in munching on it! The long tube floating in the water next to the kayak is a loose frond of Bull Kelp....

I found this huge sheet of seaweed, called Sea Lettuce, floating in the bay. I've read that this is edible, but I wasn't interested in munching on it! The long tube floating in the water next to the kayak is a loose frond of Bull Kelp. The photo is a bit cloudy because the camera had just been used underwater minutes before. 1001
168 The scenic North Head Lighthouse is located near the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center. It is built on a cliff of lava.

The scenic North Head Lighthouse is located near the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center. It is built on a cliff of lava.

The scenic North Head Lighthouse is located near the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center. It is built on a cliff of lava. 1208
169 The <strong>Cape Disappointment Lighthouse</strong> is at the mouth of the Columbia River,it is the last lighthouse on the southwest Washington coast.

The Cape Disappointment Lighthouse is at the mouth of the Columbia River,it is the last lighthouse on the southwest Washington coast.

The Cape Disappointment Lighthouse is at the mouth of the Columbia River,it is the last lighthouse on the southwest Washington coast. 1129
170 <strong>Gooseneck Barnacles</strong>
<em>Pollicipes polymerus</em>
Ilwaco, WA
June 27, 2009

The feeding arms were out of the shells when the tide went out. Barnacles use these feathery appendages to capture small organisms in the water. These ani...

Gooseneck Barnacles Pollicipes polymerus Ilwaco, WA June 27, 2009 The feeding arms were out of the shells when the tide went out. Barnacles use these feathery appendages to capture small organisms in the water. These ani...

Gooseneck Barnacles Pollicipes polymerus Ilwaco, WA June 27, 2009 The feeding arms were out of the shells when the tide went out. Barnacles use these feathery appendages to capture small organisms in the water. These animals were attached to a log that had washed up on the beach. 1214
171 <strong>Sea Sacs Seaweed </strong>
<em>Halosaccion glandiforme</em>
Ilwaco, WA
June 27, 2009

These hollow seaweeds were washed up on the beach. Even though they are green, they are in the Red Seaweed family (Rhodophyta).

Sea Sacs Seaweed Halosaccion glandiforme Ilwaco, WA June 27, 2009 These hollow seaweeds were washed up on the beach. Even though they are green, they are in the Red Seaweed family (Rhodophyta).

Sea Sacs Seaweed Halosaccion glandiforme Ilwaco, WA June 27, 2009 These hollow seaweeds were washed up on the beach. Even though they are green, they are in the Red Seaweed family (Rhodophyta). 1429
172 This Cross-barred Venus Clam Shell has a bore hole that was most likely made by a Shark's Eye snail, indicated by the countersunk opening.

This Cross-barred Venus Clam Shell has a bore hole that was most likely made by a Shark's Eye snail, indicated by the countersunk opening.

This Cross-barred Venus Clam Shell has a bore hole that was most likely made by a Shark's Eye snail, indicated by the countersunk opening. 1901
173 These are not chocolate sprinkles dropped on the beach by a messy kid, they are <strong>fecal pellets</strong> made by Ghost Shrimp that live deep in the sand. The round, often stained-looking holes nearby are their homes. Don't try to dig them out tho...

These are not chocolate sprinkles dropped on the beach by a messy kid, they are fecal pellets made by Ghost Shrimp that live deep in the sand. The round, often stained-looking holes nearby are their homes. Don't try to dig them out tho...

These are not chocolate sprinkles dropped on the beach by a messy kid, they are fecal pellets made by Ghost Shrimp that live deep in the sand. The round, often stained-looking holes nearby are their homes. Don't try to dig them out though, the holes can go as deep as 6 feet! 1407
174 <strong>Gulf White Beach Tiger Beetle</strong>
<em>Cicindela dorsalis</em> / Coleoptera
St. George Is., FL
May 21, 2010

I never could get a good, sharp photo of these beetles, they just wouldn't stay still long enough to focus on them! They have ...

Gulf White Beach Tiger Beetle Cicindela dorsalis / Coleoptera St. George Is., FL May 21, 2010 I never could get a good, sharp photo of these beetles, they just wouldn't stay still long enough to focus on them! They have ...

Gulf White Beach Tiger Beetle Cicindela dorsalis / Coleoptera St. George Is., FL May 21, 2010 I never could get a good, sharp photo of these beetles, they just wouldn't stay still long enough to focus on them! They have to be fast to catch the beachhoppers and flies they prey on. They are extremely well camouflaged, it would be easy to pass them by as you walk on the beach. 1214
175 A beach Fly

A beach Fly

A beach Fly 1229
176 A <strong>Mermaid's Purse</strong> is actually an empty Clearnose Skate egg case. The little tendrils wrap around rocks, corals or other objects on the sea floor.

A Mermaid's Purse is actually an empty Clearnose Skate egg case. The little tendrils wrap around rocks, corals or other objects on the sea floor.

A Mermaid's Purse is actually an empty Clearnose Skate egg case. The little tendrils wrap around rocks, corals or other objects on the sea floor. 3844
177 <strong>Cow-nosed Ray </strong>
<em>Rhinoptera bonasus</em>
St. George Is., FL
May 21, 2010

We were excited to see a school of 8 - 10 of these rays feeding at the edge of the surfline. Like a stingray, Cownose Rays have a spine on the tail that c...

Cow-nosed Ray Rhinoptera bonasus St. George Is., FL May 21, 2010 We were excited to see a school of 8 - 10 of these rays feeding at the edge of the surfline. Like a stingray, Cownose Rays have a spine on the tail that c...

Cow-nosed Ray Rhinoptera bonasus St. George Is., FL May 21, 2010 We were excited to see a school of 8 - 10 of these rays feeding at the edge of the surfline. Like a stingray, Cownose Rays have a spine on the tail that can inflict a mild sting. 1799
178 <strong>Beachhopper</strong>
<em>Talorchestia</em> spp.
St. George Is., FL
May 16, 2010

I enjoyed watching the beachhoppers emerge from their little holes in the sand to feed. It was quite a challenge to photograph something this small without a ...

Beachhopper Talorchestia spp. St. George Is., FL May 16, 2010 I enjoyed watching the beachhoppers emerge from their little holes in the sand to feed. It was quite a challenge to photograph something this small without a ...

Beachhopper Talorchestia spp. St. George Is., FL May 16, 2010 I enjoyed watching the beachhoppers emerge from their little holes in the sand to feed. It was quite a challenge to photograph something this small without a tripod. They are in nearly constant movement as they bounce around the sand, making a tripod very difficult to use! These tiny creatures provide a food source for ghost crabs and many shore birds. 1300
179 I photographed these Oyster shells outside a restaurant in Apalachicola, FL (which explains the lemon rind!). Oysters live in shallow beds in the bay and are harvested by fishermen. The animals are filter feeders and are highly sensitive to pollutants ...

I photographed these Oyster shells outside a restaurant in Apalachicola, FL (which explains the lemon rind!). Oysters live in shallow beds in the bay and are harvested by fishermen. The animals are filter feeders and are highly sensitive to pollutants ...

I photographed these Oyster shells outside a restaurant in Apalachicola, FL (which explains the lemon rind!). Oysters live in shallow beds in the bay and are harvested by fishermen. The animals are filter feeders and are highly sensitive to pollutants in the water. The beds were opened early in May 2010 to allow the fishermen to begin harvesting the oysters before the oil spill reached the beds. 1270
180 These two Oyster fishermen were in just one of the hundred or so boats we saw in Apalachicola Bay. These guys were out early each morning harvesting the oysters from the shallow water. They used long, rake-like tongs to scoop the shellfish off the bott...

These two Oyster fishermen were in just one of the hundred or so boats we saw in Apalachicola Bay. These guys were out early each morning harvesting the oysters from the shallow water. They used long, rake-like tongs to scoop the shellfish off the bott...

These two Oyster fishermen were in just one of the hundred or so boats we saw in Apalachicola Bay. These guys were out early each morning harvesting the oysters from the shallow water. They used long, rake-like tongs to scoop the shellfish off the bottom and then deposit them into the boat. I ate some fried oysters at a restaurant one evening, they were the best I've ever tasted! They melted in my mouth! :) I hope the 2010 oil spill will not adversely affect the oyster beds. They were opened early to allow the fishermen to harvest as many as possible before the oil arrives. 1234

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