Spiders, Ticks, and Mites

This site contains many kinds of interesting spiders and their webs. Arachniphobes beware!
Image Number Image (Click to Enlarge)CaptionImage Viewed
1 (American) <b>Funnel-web spider</strong> </b><br><i>Agelenopsis</i> spp. <br>

(American) Funnel-web spider
Agelenopsis spp.

(American) Funnel-web spider
Agelenopsis spp.
We found this large funnel web while hiking on the Lake Trail in Big Ridge State Park. The spider's funnel opening was about the size of a silver dollar! My husband found an insect to put into the opening to draw out the spider. Within a few seconds she pounced on the insect and began to wrap it with silk before biting it and injecting her venom. Check out the size of those fangs! All spiders are venomous to a degree, their venom is used to immobilize and then to partially digest their prey. In Tennessee only the Black Widow and Brown Recluse are dangerously venomous. Animals that are venomous inject their poison by either biting or stinging. To help remember this, think of the pointed bottom end of a "V" as being a single stinger and the 2 top ends as fangs. Poison has to be eaten or touched and absorbed through the skin. Think of a "P" as being round like the end of your finger or tongue. Ladybugs, Monarch caterpillars and butterflies and Poison Dart Frogs are poisonous. Spiders are Arachnids, they have 8 legs and 2 body parts (head and cephalothorax). The Australian Funnel Web spider is extremely dangerous.
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2 <strong>Brown Recluse</strong>
WARNING: Highly Venomous!
<em>Loxosceles reclusa</em>
Knoxville, TN
August 21, 2008

Thanks to Jessica, a brave reader of my website and spider enthusiast, for supplying me with this spider! She caught her in her ap...

Brown Recluse WARNING: Highly Venomous! Loxosceles reclusa Knoxville, TN August 21, 2008 Thanks to Jessica, a brave reader of my website and spider enthusiast, for supplying me with this spider! She caught her in her ap...

Brown Recluse WARNING: Highly Venomous! Loxosceles reclusa Knoxville, TN August 21, 2008 Thanks to Jessica, a brave reader of my website and spider enthusiast, for supplying me with this spider! She caught her in her apartment and kept her for me. I have been wanting to get a photo of a live Brown Recluse for years! Fortunately, the spider could not climb the slippery sides of the plastic critter box I had her in. If the Black Widow makes me nervous, this spider really gives me the jitters to photograph! This is one of the 2 dangerously venomous spiders in North America. The venom is necrotic, causing death of the affected tissue near the bite. This spider is pretty easy to identify because of the distinctive "violin" pattern on the cephalothorax. They are one of the few spiders that have 6 eyes, arranged in pairs, most spiders have 8 eyes. Of course, not many people are willing to get close enough to a Brown Recluse to look at its eyes! :) Brown Recluse information 17990
3 <strong>Black Widow</strong> - male<br> <em>Lactrodectus mactans</em><br>

Black Widow - male
Lactrodectus mactans

Black Widow - male
Lactrodectus mactans
This fascinating spider was photographed at the Rarity Ridge development in western Oak Ridge. My first reaction was that it was a Black Widow, but I realized it was not completely black on top and on the legs, and the red marks were on top of the abdomen instead of the lower side. Thanks to Dr. Riechert, an arachnologist (spider specialist) at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville, I learned that my assumption was half correct, she informed me that it is a male Black Widow (Lactrodectus mactans)! The bite of the male, unlike that of his "spouse", is harmless. Male spiders have large pedipalps which are used for mating (I won't go into the details since this is a family-friendly site! If you are interested, check out a biology book.). I tell my students if a spider has what looks like boxing gloves near the head, it is a male. Kids love being able to tell the difference between a female and male animals. (But the boys are disappointed when they find out that male bees, wasps, ants, and hornets can't sting!)
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4 <strong>Black Widow</strong> - female <em>
Lactrodectus mactans</em>
WARNING: Highly venomous!
April 24, 2008<br>
You know you have found a true friend when you get a call and she says she has captured a female Black Widow spider for you! My friend...

Black Widow - female Lactrodectus mactans WARNING: Highly venomous! April 24, 2008
You know you have found a true friend when you get a call and she says she has captured a female Black Widow spider for you! My friend...

Black Widow - female Lactrodectus mactans WARNING: Highly venomous! April 24, 2008
You know you have found a true friend when you get a call and she says she has captured a female Black Widow spider for you! My friend Diana found this spider in the crawlspace under her house and captured her by coaxing her onto a Swiffer (c) duster! Now that was imaginative! Getting a photo of a highly agitated and highly venomous spider is not an easy task! I tried three different containers until I found something that had a big enough opening I could put my macro lens into but she she couldn't climb out. A slippery-sided glass goldfish bowl worked great! Black Widows are highly venomous so I had to be very careful. I used a pair of tongs to move her from one container to another. These spiders have a neurotoxic venom which is rarely fatal when they bite. However, the venom can cause severe pain. Black Widows are often found near homes in dark corners of basements, under flower pots, wood piles, in water meters, in porch light fixtures, etc. They are cobweb weavers and make a messy nest. Despite their foreboding name, these lovely spiders rarely eat their mate! For more information regarding Black Widow spiders, visit this website: Black Widow Information
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5 <strong>Black Widow</strong> - female <em>
Lactrodectus mactans</em>
WARNING: Highly venomous!
April 24, 2008<br>
This is the distinctive red hourglass pattern on the lower abdomen of a female black widow. Getting this photo was even more difficult...

Black Widow - female Lactrodectus mactans WARNING: Highly venomous! April 24, 2008
This is the distinctive red hourglass pattern on the lower abdomen of a female black widow. Getting this photo was even more difficult...

Black Widow - female Lactrodectus mactans WARNING: Highly venomous! April 24, 2008
This is the distinctive red hourglass pattern on the lower abdomen of a female black widow. Getting this photo was even more difficult than getting the top view! I had to carefully transfer her into a petri dish, flip it over, focus and snap the picture before she righted herself. This was one time she did not like being upside down!
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6 Close-up of a Black Widow's spinneret

Close-up of a Black Widow's spinneret

Close-up of a Black Widow's spinneret with a strand of web. Note the tiny hairs on the inside of her rear "foot". My spider finally caught one of the flies I had put in her enclosure! It seems Black Widows must have poor vision and have to detect their prey by feeling the movement on their web. Another fly I had put in with her previously walked right in front of her and she never noticed it! This fly got caught in her web and she will soon dine on it! Kenny and I named her "Arachne" since we've had her for 3 months and we've become attached to her (as long as she doesn't become physically attached to us, we'll have a successful relationship!). :) 3513
7 When we came home from a week-long vacation in early July 2008, Kenny looked at the Black Widow's container and exclaimed, "You won't believe what Arachne has done!" It didn't take too much imagination to think what a female spider might do! I received...

When we came home from a week-long vacation in early July 2008, Kenny looked at the Black Widow's container and exclaimed, "You won't believe what Arachne has done!" It didn't take too much imagination to think what a female spider might do! I received...

When we came home from a week-long vacation in early July 2008, Kenny looked at the Black Widow's container and exclaimed, "You won't believe what Arachne has done!" It didn't take too much imagination to think what a female spider might do! I received her in late April and she has not been with another spider since, so she had mated before Diana caught her. I guess the large number of flies that Kenny caught for her before we left gave her the burst of nutrition she needed to lay her eggs. I'm not yet sure what I'm going to do with her "little bundles of joy" when they make their entrance into the world! :-0 She is highly protective of the egg case. 3315
8 <strong>Black Widow babies </strong>
Sometime during the wee hours of Aug. 3, 2008 the Black Widow's first egg case hatched. When I saw them their case was on the floor of their enclosure (a sealed plastic corsage box), presumably bitten off by their ...

Black Widow babies Sometime during the wee hours of Aug. 3, 2008 the Black Widow's first egg case hatched. When I saw them their case was on the floor of their enclosure (a sealed plastic corsage box), presumably bitten off by their ...

Black Widow babies Sometime during the wee hours of Aug. 3, 2008 the Black Widow's first egg case hatched. When I saw them their case was on the floor of their enclosure (a sealed plastic corsage box), presumably bitten off by their mother after they hatched. I assume the spiderlings with the larger abdomens are females and the thinner ones are males. I was surprised that they were orange with a black dot on the abdomen, just the opposite of what I had assumed they would look like! That's what makes studying nature interesting, you often learn your preconceived notions aren't always correct. Later today I will release these little critters far away from civilization so they can live, but not hurt anyone. 15108
9 <strong>Orchard Orbweaver</strong> <br><em>Leucauge venusta</em>

Orchard Orbweaver
Leucauge venusta

Orchard Orbweaver
Leucauge venusta I photographed this pretty Spider with red spots in my parents' yard in Florida. When I moved in with my camera she turned up her abdomen to expose the red spots.
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10 Close-up of Orchard Spider

Close-up of Orchard Spider

Close-up of Orchard Spider 3725
11 <strong>Basilica Spider</strong> with egg sacks
<em>Mecynogea lemniscata</em>
Some spiders take their prey to the center part of their web to eat at a later time, but she won't be eating these, they are her egg sacks!

Basilica Spider with egg sacks Mecynogea lemniscata Some spiders take their prey to the center part of their web to eat at a later time, but she won't be eating these, they are her egg sacks!

Basilica Spider with egg sacks Mecynogea lemniscata Some spiders take their prey to the center part of their web to eat at a later time, but she won't be eating these, they are her egg sacks! 4238
12 Spiders take advantage of any convenient structure they can find! This orbweb was strung between the old barbed wire on a fence. Many spiders build a new web every day.

Spiders take advantage of any convenient structure they can find! This orbweb was strung between the old barbed wire on a fence. Many spiders build a new web every day.

Spiders take advantage of any convenient structure they can find! This orbweb was strung between the old barbed wire on a fence. Many spiders build a new web every day. 3233
13 <strong>Florida Banded Argiope</strong> <br> <em>Argiope florida </em>

Florida Banded Argiope
Argiope florida

Florida Banded Argiope
Argiope florida This spider caught my attention because of the X-shaped web. We saw it while hiking at Blackwater River State Park in Munson, FL. It is in the same genus as the Garden Spider.
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14 <strong>Black & Yellow Argiope; Garden Spider; Writing Spider</strong>
<em>Argiope aurantia</em>
This is my favorite spider! Garden Spiders are beautiful, they build large, interesting webs. This is the spider of <u>Charlotte's Web</u> fame, so it ca...

Black & Yellow Argiope; Garden Spider; Writing Spider Argiope aurantia This is my favorite spider! Garden Spiders are beautiful, they build large, interesting webs. This is the spider of Charlotte's Web fame, so it ca...

Black & Yellow Argiope; Garden Spider; Writing Spider Argiope aurantia This is my favorite spider! Garden Spiders are beautiful, they build large, interesting webs. This is the spider of Charlotte's Web fame, so it can't be too bad! :) I photographed this one at my parents' house in Florida. 7061
15 Garden Spiders are big and beautiful, they are one of my favorite arachnids! Their bright yellow and black markings are warning signals to birds not to eat them. The zigzag lines on the web may be an attractant for insects or they may be to help repel ...

Garden Spiders are big and beautiful, they are one of my favorite arachnids! Their bright yellow and black markings are warning signals to birds not to eat them. The zigzag lines on the web may be an attractant for insects or they may be to help repel ...

Garden Spiders are big and beautiful, they are one of my favorite arachnids! Their bright yellow and black markings are warning signals to birds not to eat them. The zigzag lines on the web may be an attractant for insects or they may be to help repel birds. I've had students tell me, "If a Writin' Spider writes your name in its web, you'll die!" My response is a smile and I say, "Well, unless your name is 'ZZZZZZZ', you don't have to worry about it!" 4392
16 Spiders can control the amount of stickiness of their webs by adding tiny dots of what I call "Spiderweb glue." The web's spokes and the central part of the web where the spider stays doesn't have the sticky substance. Insects that get caught in the "g...

Spiders can control the amount of stickiness of their webs by adding tiny dots of what I call "Spiderweb glue." The web's spokes and the central part of the web where the spider stays doesn't have the sticky substance. Insects that get caught in the "g...

Spiders can control the amount of stickiness of their webs by adding tiny dots of what I call "Spiderweb glue." The web's spokes and the central part of the web where the spider stays doesn't have the sticky substance. Insects that get caught in the "glue" become entrapped, when the spider detects a struggle she runs up and wraps them in a blanket of silk. (see next photo) 2312
17 A Garden Spider spinning silk around an insect. Spiders can control the type of silk they spin depending on the function it will serve. This wide band of several strands is different than the sticky, prey-catching strands used in web building.

A Garden Spider spinning silk around an insect. Spiders can control the type of silk they spin depending on the function it will serve. This wide band of several strands is different than the sticky, prey-catching strands used in web building.

A Garden Spider spinning silk around an insect. Spiders can control the type of silk they spin depending on the function it will serve. This wide band of several strands is different than the sticky, prey-catching strands used in web building. 3356
18 <strong>Golden Silk Spider</strong>
<em>Nephila clavipes</em>
Milton, FL
August 30, 2008

Wow, what a beautiful spider this is! I found her in the woods in my parents' yard. The local people call them "Banana spiders". I tried to measure her with ...

Golden Silk Spider Nephila clavipes Milton, FL August 30, 2008 Wow, what a beautiful spider this is! I found her in the woods in my parents' yard. The local people call them "Banana spiders". I tried to measure her with ...

Golden Silk Spider Nephila clavipes Milton, FL August 30, 2008 Wow, what a beautiful spider this is! I found her in the woods in my parents' yard. The local people call them "Banana spiders". I tried to measure her with my finger, she was about 3" long from the tip of her front legs to the tip of her hind legs! The only other time I had seen one of these spiders was in the Everglades several years ago. 3084
19 This photo shows the great difference in size between the male (smaller) and female Golden Silk Spiders. I noticed 5 males on her web, quite a little harem she had! :) This guy seemed to be the most persistent of them all. One other male had just 5 leg...

This photo shows the great difference in size between the male (smaller) and female Golden Silk Spiders. I noticed 5 males on her web, quite a little harem she had! :) This guy seemed to be the most persistent of them all. One other male had just 5 leg...

This photo shows the great difference in size between the male (smaller) and female Golden Silk Spiders. I noticed 5 males on her web, quite a little harem she had! :) This guy seemed to be the most persistent of them all. One other male had just 5 legs, I guess he was a "survivor" of previous mating attempts. 2912
20 This close -up of Golden silk spider web shows the tiny amber-colored drops of "spider glue" that gives the web its distinctive color.

This close -up of Golden silk spider web shows the tiny amber-colored drops of "spider glue" that gives the web its distinctive color.

This close -up of Golden silk spider web shows the tiny amber-colored drops of "spider glue" that gives the web its distinctive color. 2021
21 <strong>Dewdrop Spider</strong> - female
<em>Argyrodes elevatus</em>
Milton, FL
August 30, 2008

I first noticed this little silver spider as a white spot on the photos I had taken of the Golden Silk Spider. When I looked for the cause of the spot...

Dewdrop Spider - female Argyrodes elevatus Milton, FL August 30, 2008 I first noticed this little silver spider as a white spot on the photos I had taken of the Golden Silk Spider. When I looked for the cause of the spot...

Dewdrop Spider - female Argyrodes elevatus Milton, FL August 30, 2008 I first noticed this little silver spider as a white spot on the photos I had taken of the Golden Silk Spider. When I looked for the cause of the spots, I saw this one and several others like it. Thanks to Eric at Bugguide for identifying her for me! He also told me that these spiders have an interesting, if not very risky, habit of living on other spiders' webs and stealing their prey from the often very large webs. 2573
22 "Cross Spider" 
<em>Neoscona crucifera</em>
Milton, FL
August 31, 2008

We watched this spider spin her web on a friend's porch. It is amazing how fast they can put such a complicated web together. Many orb weavers spin a new web every night, eati...

"Cross Spider" Neoscona crucifera Milton, FL August 31, 2008 We watched this spider spin her web on a friend's porch. It is amazing how fast they can put such a complicated web together. Many orb weavers spin a new web every night, eati...

"Cross Spider" Neoscona crucifera Milton, FL August 31, 2008 We watched this spider spin her web on a friend's porch. It is amazing how fast they can put such a complicated web together. Many orb weavers spin a new web every night, eating the old one in the morning. I can't find a common name for this spider; I'm calling it a "Cross spider" since crucifera means cross. Notice the cross shape on the top of her abdomen. 5987
23 So many bugs, so little time! These two spiders certainly won't go hungry! If you don't see them, they are at the lower right corner of each web. I photographed these webs along the Melton Lake walking trail in Oak Ridge.

So many bugs, so little time! These two spiders certainly won't go hungry! If you don't see them, they are at the lower right corner of each web. I photographed these webs along the Melton Lake walking trail in Oak Ridge.

So many bugs, so little time! These two spiders certainly won't go hungry! If you don't see them, they are at the lower right corner of each web. I photographed these webs along the Melton Lake walking trail in Oak Ridge. 2440
24 This spider (<em>Cyclosa</em> spp.) was camouflaged to look like a bird dropping, it is the whitish "blob" in the center! It had its dried food in the middle of the web. I found it on a window at school.

This spider (Cyclosa spp.) was camouflaged to look like a bird dropping, it is the whitish "blob" in the center! It had its dried food in the middle of the web. I found it on a window at school.

This spider (Cyclosa spp.) was camouflaged to look like a bird dropping, it is the whitish "blob" in the center! It had its dried food in the middle of the web. I found it on a window at school. 3076
25 <strong>Crab or Flower spider</strong>
<em>Misumena or Misumenops genus</em><br>
These are beautiful, colorful spiders that can be many different colors often matching the flower on which they are hiding. I've seen them pink, green, yellow, and brown...

Crab or Flower spider Misumena or Misumenops genus
These are beautiful, colorful spiders that can be many different colors often matching the flower on which they are hiding. I've seen them pink, green, yellow, and brown...

Crab or Flower spider Misumena or Misumenops genus
These are beautiful, colorful spiders that can be many different colors often matching the flower on which they are hiding. I've seen them pink, green, yellow, and brown. The little black beetle must not have interested the spider since she didn't even flinch when it crawled over her!
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26 I found this well-camouflaged Crab Spider eating a butterfly at Haw Ridge. The disk flowers are infected with a white fungus. So much drama on a single plant!

I found this well-camouflaged Crab Spider eating a butterfly at Haw Ridge. The disk flowers are infected with a white fungus. So much drama on a single plant!

I found this well-camouflaged Crab Spider eating a butterfly at Haw Ridge. The disk flowers are infected with a white fungus. So much drama on a single plant! 3189
27 This Crab spider was devouring a fly on a Buttercup flower at Frozen Head State Park. Since the petals of buttercups are so shiny, they reflect a lot of light (which explains the bad glare behind the spider!).

This Crab spider was devouring a fly on a Buttercup flower at Frozen Head State Park. Since the petals of buttercups are so shiny, they reflect a lot of light (which explains the bad glare behind the spider!).

This Crab spider was devouring a fly on a Buttercup flower at Frozen Head State Park. Since the petals of buttercups are so shiny, they reflect a lot of light (which explains the bad glare behind the spider!). 3010
28 A Crab spider eating a fly

A Crab spider eating a fly

A Crab spider eating a fly 2506
29 I was amazed to see this Crab Spider eating <u>another spider</u> between the leaves of a Tiger Lily in my garden!

I was amazed to see this Crab Spider eating another spider between the leaves of a Tiger Lily in my garden!

I was amazed to see this Crab Spider eating another spider between the leaves of a Tiger Lily in my garden! 2077
30 If you've ever wondered how to tell a male spider from a female, this photo will help! The 2 <em>pedipalps</em> up near the head are enlarged and often pointed on a male spider, they are used for mating.

If you've ever wondered how to tell a male spider from a female, this photo will help! The 2 pedipalps up near the head are enlarged and often pointed on a male spider, they are used for mating.

If you've ever wondered how to tell a male spider from a female, this photo will help! The 2 pedipalps up near the head are enlarged and often pointed on a male spider, they are used for mating. 4964
31 A Male Crab spider

Note the enlarged pedipalps ("boxing gloves") next to the fangs. This picture was taken with 2+ and 4+ diopter attachments on my wide angle lens, so the depth of field is extremely narrow! The spider was running around on a picnic...

A Male Crab spider Note the enlarged pedipalps ("boxing gloves") next to the fangs. This picture was taken with 2+ and 4+ diopter attachments on my wide angle lens, so the depth of field is extremely narrow! The spider was running around on a picnic...

A Male Crab spider Note the enlarged pedipalps ("boxing gloves") next to the fangs. This picture was taken with 2+ and 4+ diopter attachments on my wide angle lens, so the depth of field is extremely narrow! The spider was running around on a picnic table while we were eating lunch at Haw Ridge. I never pass up a good photographic moment if I don't have to! 3085
32 This <strong>Jumping Spider</strong> (<em>Phidippus</em> spp.) had found a meal of a beetle on some Pinxterflowers. Check out those cool eyes! Jumping spiders are not web builders, they have large eyes for hunting their prey. These spiders will spin a ...

This Jumping Spider (Phidippus spp.) had found a meal of a beetle on some Pinxterflowers. Check out those cool eyes! Jumping spiders are not web builders, they have large eyes for hunting their prey. These spiders will spin a ...

This Jumping Spider (Phidippus spp.) had found a meal of a beetle on some Pinxterflowers. Check out those cool eyes! Jumping spiders are not web builders, they have large eyes for hunting their prey. These spiders will spin a single silk dragline. 4205
33 A close-up photo of a Jumping Spider. Notice the 2 large eyes. These spiders are hunters, they don't spin webs. They have well-developed vision due to their large eyes. All spiders spin a silk "safety line" to protect them from falling. Jumping spiders...

A close-up photo of a Jumping Spider. Notice the 2 large eyes. These spiders are hunters, they don't spin webs. They have well-developed vision due to their large eyes. All spiders spin a silk "safety line" to protect them from falling. Jumping spiders...

A close-up photo of a Jumping Spider. Notice the 2 large eyes. These spiders are hunters, they don't spin webs. They have well-developed vision due to their large eyes. All spiders spin a silk "safety line" to protect them from falling. Jumping spiders are in the family Salticidae, "saltar" means "to jump" in Spanish! 4070
34 <strong>Ant Mimic Spider</strong>
<em>Peckhamia pictata</em>
Oak Ridge, TN
May 4, 2008

I'd seen drawings and photos of these spiders in books, so I recognized it when I found it while hiking at Haw Ridge. It is amazing how much these spiders look...

Ant Mimic Spider Peckhamia pictata Oak Ridge, TN May 4, 2008 I'd seen drawings and photos of these spiders in books, so I recognized it when I found it while hiking at Haw Ridge. It is amazing how much these spiders look...

Ant Mimic Spider Peckhamia pictata Oak Ridge, TN May 4, 2008 I'd seen drawings and photos of these spiders in books, so I recognized it when I found it while hiking at Haw Ridge. It is amazing how much these spiders look and act like an ant. The constriction between the cephalothorax and the abdomen looks just like that of an ant. I noticed the spider moved its front legs the way an ant does its antennae. 3431
35 This is possibly a <b>Woodlouse Spider</b>, I found it crawling on a decaying log in the Smokies. These spiders eat woodlice, a.k.a. "pillbugs". Their bite is painful, although not lethal. I don't know why the abdomen is so wrinkled, perhaps it is a fe...

This is possibly a Woodlouse Spider, I found it crawling on a decaying log in the Smokies. These spiders eat woodlice, a.k.a. "pillbugs". Their bite is painful, although not lethal. I don't know why the abdomen is so wrinkled, perhaps it is a fe...

This is possibly a Woodlouse Spider, I found it crawling on a decaying log in the Smokies. These spiders eat woodlice, a.k.a. "pillbugs". Their bite is painful, although not lethal. I don't know why the abdomen is so wrinkled, perhaps it is a female who just laid eggs. 4447
36 <strong>Green Lynx Spider</strong> female 
<em>Peucetia viridans</em>
This is a common spider in the southeast. I found this one living in my parents' yard on a Passionflower vine in Florida. They don't spin a web, they wait for their prey to come to...

Green Lynx Spider female Peucetia viridans This is a common spider in the southeast. I found this one living in my parents' yard on a Passionflower vine in Florida. They don't spin a web, they wait for their prey to come to...

Green Lynx Spider female Peucetia viridans This is a common spider in the southeast. I found this one living in my parents' yard on a Passionflower vine in Florida. They don't spin a web, they wait for their prey to come to them. I saw one eating a bee. 2709
37 <strong>Green Lynx Spider</strong> male 
<em>Peucetia viridans</em>
Notice how the abdomen is thinner on the male than the female in the previous photo. The male also has large <em>pedipalps</em> which are used for mating.

Green Lynx Spider male Peucetia viridans Notice how the abdomen is thinner on the male than the female in the previous photo. The male also has large pedipalps which are used for mating.

Green Lynx Spider male Peucetia viridans Notice how the abdomen is thinner on the male than the female in the previous photo. The male also has large pedipalps which are used for mating. 2092
38 <strong>Spiny-backed Orb Weaver Spider </strong>
<em>Gasteracantha</em> spp.
Milton, FL
August 31, 2008

I nearly walked into this spider's web while touring my parents' yard. What an interesting pattern she has on her abdomen.

Spiny-backed Orb Weaver Spider Gasteracantha spp. Milton, FL August 31, 2008 I nearly walked into this spider's web while touring my parents' yard. What an interesting pattern she has on her abdomen.

Spiny-backed Orb Weaver Spider Gasteracantha spp. Milton, FL August 31, 2008 I nearly walked into this spider's web while touring my parents' yard. What an interesting pattern she has on her abdomen. 3467
39 <strong>Spined Micrathena Spider</strong>
<em>Micrathena gracilis</em><br>
Micrathena Spiders are among the strangest-looking spiders you might encounter in the woods. The abdomen has stripes and spikes, probably as a deterrent to birds. I'm an "arac...

Spined Micrathena Spider Micrathena gracilis
Micrathena Spiders are among the strangest-looking spiders you might encounter in the woods. The abdomen has stripes and spikes, probably as a deterrent to birds. I'm an "arac...

Spined Micrathena Spider Micrathena gracilis
Micrathena Spiders are among the strangest-looking spiders you might encounter in the woods. The abdomen has stripes and spikes, probably as a deterrent to birds. I'm an "arachnophile," I like spiders, they are so interesting! My husband had to put his hat behind the web so I could focus my camera on the spider.
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40 <strong>Arrowshaped Micrathena</strong>
<em>Micrathena sagitatta</em>
I think these are the most interesting looking spiders, it almost looks like a creature from a science fiction movie! This one was seen along a trail at the University of Tennessee...

Arrowshaped Micrathena Micrathena sagitatta I think these are the most interesting looking spiders, it almost looks like a creature from a science fiction movie! This one was seen along a trail at the University of Tennessee...

Arrowshaped Micrathena Micrathena sagitatta I think these are the most interesting looking spiders, it almost looks like a creature from a science fiction movie! This one was seen along a trail at the University of Tennessee Arboretum. This is a lower view of the spider (I needed a leaf to use a backdrop for focusing). 3381
41 <strong>Arrowhead Spider</strong>
<em>Verrucosa arenata</em>
This pretty Spider has a Yellow triangle on her abdomen. It is common to find these orb weavers with webs across the middle of hiking trails.

Arrowhead Spider Verrucosa arenata This pretty Spider has a Yellow triangle on her abdomen. It is common to find these orb weavers with webs across the middle of hiking trails.

Arrowhead Spider Verrucosa arenata This pretty Spider has a Yellow triangle on her abdomen. It is common to find these orb weavers with webs across the middle of hiking trails. 6170
42 Look closely at this "Deadly Daisy." Do you see 3 hungry critters waiting for a meal? There are 2 <strong>crab spiders</strong> hiding on the back side of the "petals" (ray flowers) and the brown, skinny-legged <strong>stilt bug</strong> (<em>Jalysus</...

Look closely at this "Deadly Daisy." Do you see 3 hungry critters waiting for a meal? There are 2 crab spiders hiding on the back side of the "petals" (ray flowers) and the brown, skinny-legged stilt bug (Jalysus

Look closely at this "Deadly Daisy." Do you see 3 hungry critters waiting for a meal? There are 2 crab spiders hiding on the back side of the "petals" (ray flowers) and the brown, skinny-legged stilt bug (Jalysus spp.) ready to pounce on an unsuspecting small bee or fly. Thanks to the folks at the Mantidforum for setting me straight on the stilt bug, I thought it was a thread-legged bug. I guess since there are over 1 million named insects and the fact that I'm not an entomologist, I'm due to make a few mistakes! :) I will always try to rectify my mistake if I can verify what someone else says. 3337
43 This Wolf spider with her egg case caused quite a bit of excitement one day during the 2008 Science Camp. I caught her in a collection jar so I could photograph her. Later in the day she moved the egg case to her abdomen and attached it with a strand o...

This Wolf spider with her egg case caused quite a bit of excitement one day during the 2008 Science Camp. I caught her in a collection jar so I could photograph her. Later in the day she moved the egg case to her abdomen and attached it with a strand o...

This Wolf spider with her egg case caused quite a bit of excitement one day during the 2008 Science Camp. I caught her in a collection jar so I could photograph her. Later in the day she moved the egg case to her abdomen and attached it with a strand of silk. I released her after the kids left. In a few days the spiderlings will hatch and crawl up onto her back to be protected. So see, even creepy, crawly things can be good mothers! :) Wolf spiders are hunting spiders, they have highly developed eyes, notice her 2 large eyes and the 4 smaller ones below. She has 2 more on top of her head that can't be seen in this photo. 5424
44 <strong>An "arachniphobe's" worst nightmare!</strong>

As I was packing my car for science camp one evening, I spotted this Wolf Spider with spiderlings on her back crawling on the carport. I captured her in a jar and took her the next day, she cause...

An "arachniphobe's" worst nightmare! As I was packing my car for science camp one evening, I spotted this Wolf Spider with spiderlings on her back crawling on the carport. I captured her in a jar and took her the next day, she cause...

An "arachniphobe's" worst nightmare! As I was packing my car for science camp one evening, I spotted this Wolf Spider with spiderlings on her back crawling on the carport. I captured her in a jar and took her the next day, she caused quite a bit of excitement! I have no idea how many babies she had, but they completely covered her abdomen and much of her cephalothorax. What an exciting sight! 5540
45 <strong>Spider eyeshine</strong>

A fun thing to do on a warm spring or summer night is to go outside with a bright flashlight and hunt for spiders. Hold the flashlight above your head and scan the grass. If you see a tiny white light shining back at...

Spider eyeshine A fun thing to do on a warm spring or summer night is to go outside with a bright flashlight and hunt for spiders. Hold the flashlight above your head and scan the grass. If you see a tiny white light shining back at...

Spider eyeshine A fun thing to do on a warm spring or summer night is to go outside with a bright flashlight and hunt for spiders. Hold the flashlight above your head and scan the grass. If you see a tiny white light shining back at you, it will be the reflected eyeshine of a spider (kind of like the "deer in the headlights" effect). The bigger the spider, the bigger the reflection; this Wolf Spider was really easy to find! The hard part of getting this photo was the position I had to get in to be at the right angle to catch the reflection! My husband held the light and I had to lay flat on the ground! This photo was taken at my parents' house in Florida. 3259
46 This is a view of the underside of the male Grass Spider.

This is a view of the underside of the male Grass Spider.

This is a view of the underside of the male Grass Spider. 2194
47 <strong>Bowl and Doily Spider Web</strong>
<em>Frontinella pyramitela</em>
Spiders build a fascinating variety of webs. This kind is called a "Cup and Saucer" (or Bowl and Doily) web, built by the Bowl and Doily Spider. These are often found in weeds...

Bowl and Doily Spider Web Frontinella pyramitela Spiders build a fascinating variety of webs. This kind is called a "Cup and Saucer" (or Bowl and Doily) web, built by the Bowl and Doily Spider. These are often found in weeds...

Bowl and Doily Spider Web Frontinella pyramitela Spiders build a fascinating variety of webs. This kind is called a "Cup and Saucer" (or Bowl and Doily) web, built by the Bowl and Doily Spider. These are often found in weeds about 2 - 3 feet above the ground. The spider stays just beneath the top web, the "bowl." Small insects get caught in the upper web and get eaten. I found this one in a field on a foggy June morning during the Science Camp where I teach. 2797
48 <strong>Bowl and Doily Spider; Cup and Saucer Spider</strong>
<em>Frontinella pyramitela </em> 

These are rather small spiders, so you have to get down low and look up to get a good view of them! The spider makes her web on weeds and small bushes. ...

Bowl and Doily Spider; Cup and Saucer Spider Frontinella pyramitela These are rather small spiders, so you have to get down low and look up to get a good view of them! The spider makes her web on weeds and small bushes. ...

Bowl and Doily Spider; Cup and Saucer Spider Frontinella pyramitela These are rather small spiders, so you have to get down low and look up to get a good view of them! The spider makes her web on weeds and small bushes. She lives under the "bowl" or "cup" part of the web and brings the food to that area to eat it. 2137
49 <strong>Bowl and Doily Spiders mating</strong>

Kenny and I were hiking at Haw Ridge when I spotted a spider in a web on the side of the trail. Suddenly, I noticed it had WAY too many legs! The 2 spiders were mating! It was interesting to see how the...

Bowl and Doily Spiders mating Kenny and I were hiking at Haw Ridge when I spotted a spider in a web on the side of the trail. Suddenly, I noticed it had WAY too many legs! The 2 spiders were mating! It was interesting to see how the...

Bowl and Doily Spiders mating Kenny and I were hiking at Haw Ridge when I spotted a spider in a web on the side of the trail. Suddenly, I noticed it had WAY too many legs! The 2 spiders were mating! It was interesting to see how the male courted her. Her abdomen was facing upward. The male had the back of his head next to her mouth (a dangerous place to be!). He rapidly beat his 2 black pedipalps on the upper section of her abdomen to get her "warmed up", so to speak! She had a black tube that he would pluck with the pedipalps. His corkscrew-like organs (visible in this photo) would come out of the palps to finish the job. I have to word this very carefully! :) This was a very difficult shot to get because the wind was blowing! 2420
50 <strong>Common House Spider, Egg cases and Spiderlings</strong>
<em>Achaearanea tepidariorum</em>
Although this is a "House" spider, it was found under a "rock house" along the trail at Piney River trail. These spiders must have a very high mortality...

Common House Spider, Egg cases and Spiderlings Achaearanea tepidariorum Although this is a "House" spider, it was found under a "rock house" along the trail at Piney River trail. These spiders must have a very high mortality...

Common House Spider, Egg cases and Spiderlings Achaearanea tepidariorum Although this is a "House" spider, it was found under a "rock house" along the trail at Piney River trail. These spiders must have a very high mortality rate to produce so many young! 4406
51 These <strong>Spider egg cases</strong> will be the home of the spiderlings for the winter. I photographed them on a cliffside at Piney Falls in October 2006.

These Spider egg cases will be the home of the spiderlings for the winter. I photographed them on a cliffside at Piney Falls in October 2006.

These Spider egg cases will be the home of the spiderlings for the winter. I photographed them on a cliffside at Piney Falls in October 2006. 1822
52 These Spiderlings were found on the ground at Frozen Head. Baby spiders don't make good brothers and sisters, they have a tendency to eat their siblings! Many spiderlings will climb to the edge of a branch and spin silk to be carried away by a breeze, ...

These Spiderlings were found on the ground at Frozen Head. Baby spiders don't make good brothers and sisters, they have a tendency to eat their siblings! Many spiderlings will climb to the edge of a branch and spin silk to be carried away by a breeze, ...

These Spiderlings were found on the ground at Frozen Head. Baby spiders don't make good brothers and sisters, they have a tendency to eat their siblings! Many spiderlings will climb to the edge of a branch and spin silk to be carried away by a breeze, this mode of "transportation" is called ballooning. 2661
53 A <strong>Fishing Spider</strong>
<em>Dolomedes</em> spp.
An interesting spider on a rock at Piney River. It really does have 8 legs, the 2 front ones are held together.

A Fishing Spider Dolomedes spp. An interesting spider on a rock at Piney River. It really does have 8 legs, the 2 front ones are held together.

A Fishing Spider Dolomedes spp. An interesting spider on a rock at Piney River. It really does have 8 legs, the 2 front ones are held together. 2827
54 I found this large Spider in a shallow stream near Tremont in the Smokies. It is probably a fishing spider since it was walking on the surface of the water.

I found this large Spider in a shallow stream near Tremont in the Smokies. It is probably a fishing spider since it was walking on the surface of the water.

I found this large Spider in a shallow stream near Tremont in the Smokies. It is probably a fishing spider since it was walking on the surface of the water. 2311
55 <strong>Fishing Spider</strong>

I spotted this spider walking on the surface of the pond at Haw Ridge in Oak Ridge. Like Water Striders (they are <u>not</u> related), they are able to walk on the surface tension of the pond.

Fishing Spider I spotted this spider walking on the surface of the pond at Haw Ridge in Oak Ridge. Like Water Striders (they are not related), they are able to walk on the surface tension of the pond.

Fishing Spider I spotted this spider walking on the surface of the pond at Haw Ridge in Oak Ridge. Like Water Striders (they are not related), they are able to walk on the surface tension of the pond. 2040
56 <strong>Long-bodied Cellar Spider</strong> - male
<em>Pholcus phalangioides</em>
Oak Ridge, TN
August 18, 2008

I found this guy in my room at school. I put him in a plastic "critter cage", which explains the backwards Japanese writing in the phot...

Long-bodied Cellar Spider - male Pholcus phalangioides Oak Ridge, TN August 18, 2008 I found this guy in my room at school. I put him in a plastic "critter cage", which explains the backwards Japanese writing in the phot...

Long-bodied Cellar Spider - male Pholcus phalangioides Oak Ridge, TN August 18, 2008 I found this guy in my room at school. I put him in a plastic "critter cage", which explains the backwards Japanese writing in the photo! The female's web was nearby, I tried "introducing" the couple by putting her in his web, but she would have no part of it! ;) These spiders can become cannibals if they don't have enough food from insect prey! 3471
57 A Cellar Spider with her eggs.

A Cellar Spider with her eggs.

A Cellar Spider with her eggs. 2487
58 Lampshade Spider Web<br>
These spiders make an unusual, cylindrical web on rocks and cliffsides. Look for the female spider inside the web. Her smaller mate will probably be lurking nearby.

Lampshade Spider Web
These spiders make an unusual, cylindrical web on rocks and cliffsides. Look for the female spider inside the web. Her smaller mate will probably be lurking nearby.

Lampshade Spider Web
These spiders make an unusual, cylindrical web on rocks and cliffsides. Look for the female spider inside the web. Her smaller mate will probably be lurking nearby.
2056
59 <strong>Lampshade Spider</strong>
<em>Hypochilidae</em> family
I had to take this picture of this female Lampshade spiderwith a flash because she was under a dark cliff. The female is much larger than the male, he often hangs out on the outer edges o...

Lampshade Spider Hypochilidae family I had to take this picture of this female Lampshade spiderwith a flash because she was under a dark cliff. The female is much larger than the male, he often hangs out on the outer edges o...

Lampshade Spider Hypochilidae family I had to take this picture of this female Lampshade spiderwith a flash because she was under a dark cliff. The female is much larger than the male, he often hangs out on the outer edges of her web. 3139
60 Lampshade spider - female

Note how each foot is attached to the side of her web.

Lampshade spider - female Note how each foot is attached to the side of her web.

Lampshade spider - female Note how each foot is attached to the side of her web. 1706
61 Long-jawed Orb weaver Spider in a jar at 2007 Science camp

Long-jawed Orb weaver Spider in a jar at 2007 Science camp

Long-jawed Orb weaver Spider in a jar at 2007 Science camp 1551
62 <strong>Long-jawed Orb weaver Spider</strong>
<em>Tetragnatha</em> spp.

Long-jawed Orb weaver Spider Tetragnatha spp.

Long-jawed Orb weaver Spider Tetragnatha spp. 2287
63 <strong>A Sheetweb spider</strong>
<em>Florinda coccinea</em>
Oak Ridge, TN
June 2007

This beautiful little red Spider was found in the field during our Habitat Hunters activity at science camp. It was covered in tiny dew drops which refracted th...

A Sheetweb spider Florinda coccinea Oak Ridge, TN June 2007 This beautiful little red Spider was found in the field during our Habitat Hunters activity at science camp. It was covered in tiny dew drops which refracted th...

A Sheetweb spider Florinda coccinea Oak Ridge, TN June 2007 This beautiful little red Spider was found in the field during our Habitat Hunters activity at science camp. It was covered in tiny dew drops which refracted the morning sunlight into a shimmering rainbow. The species name, coccinea means "red". 2265
64 <strong>Red Velvet mite</strong>
<em>Trombidium</em> sp.
These pretty little harmless red mites are a treat to see in the woods. They live in the soil and eat soil bacteria and fungi. Mites are <em>arachnids</em>, like spiders, ticks, and scorpions.

Red Velvet mite Trombidium sp. These pretty little harmless red mites are a treat to see in the woods. They live in the soil and eat soil bacteria and fungi. Mites are arachnids, like spiders, ticks, and scorpions.

Red Velvet mite Trombidium sp. These pretty little harmless red mites are a treat to see in the woods. They live in the soil and eat soil bacteria and fungi. Mites are arachnids, like spiders, ticks, and scorpions. 3403
65 I spotted this lovely red Velvet Mite while photographing wildflowers at Norris Dam State Park. I am really enjoying my macro lens! :)

I spotted this lovely red Velvet Mite while photographing wildflowers at Norris Dam State Park. I am really enjoying my macro lens! :)

I spotted this lovely red Velvet Mite while photographing wildflowers at Norris Dam State Park. I am really enjoying my macro lens! :) 1761
66 <strong>Lone Star Tick</strong> (female)<em>Amblyoma americanum</em>Oak Ridge, TNJune 2007Ticks are arachnids (because they have 8 legs), but they are NOT spiders. They do not make webs or spin silk. The <u>good</u> news about Lone Star tick ...

Lone Star Tick (female)Amblyoma americanumOak Ridge, TNJune 2007Ticks are arachnids (because they have 8 legs), but they are NOT spiders. They do not make webs or spin silk. The good news about Lone Star tick ...

Lone Star Tick (female) Amblyoma americanum Oak Ridge, TN June 2007 Ticks are arachnids (because they have 8 legs), but they are NOT spiders. They do not make webs or spin silk. The good news about Lone Star tick is it doesn't carry Lyme disease (see next photo), the bad news is it does carry Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever! Lone Star ticks get their name from the single white dot on the abdomen. We found this one crawling on a beatsheet during science camp. There is a large population of white-tailed deer in the area, they are one of the main food sources for these ticks. They are happy to take a few microliters of blood from a human too! It is hard to believe that an animal can have only 3 meals in its lifetime, but that is what ticks do. They hatch into a 6-legged larva (although I must say I have not bothered to count the legs when I pull one of those little suckers off!), eat a blood meal, molt into an 8-legged nymph, eat again and molt into an adult. Then up to 3 years later the adults mate, the female eats another blood meal, she lays thousands of eggs, and finally, she dies. Ticks inject an anticoagulant into their victim to keep the blood flowing while they eat. Unfortunately, that substance can trigger allergic reactions in some people. I'm one of them, I will have severe itching for a month at the site of the bite of even the tiniest tick. Here is a good website to explain the life cycle of ticks: Tick Biology 5807
67 Lone Star Tick

This tick fell out of a shrub when I was showing the kids at science camp how to collect insects and other critters into a beat sheet. It is easy to see the single dot ("Lone Star") in the center of the abdomen. These ticks use their ...

Lone Star Tick This tick fell out of a shrub when I was showing the kids at science camp how to collect insects and other critters into a beat sheet. It is easy to see the single dot ("Lone Star") in the center of the abdomen. These ticks use their ...

Lone Star Tick This tick fell out of a shrub when I was showing the kids at science camp how to collect insects and other critters into a beat sheet. It is easy to see the single dot ("Lone Star") in the center of the abdomen. These ticks use their long front legs to grab onto passing prey. 2008 has been an unusually "ticky" year! 2164
68 <strong>Deer Tick; Black-Legged tick</strong>
<em>Ixodes scapularis</em>
May 23, 2008

I pulled this tiny Deer Tick out of my husband's leg, he found it after mowing the grass. Ironically, we had seen 3 deer in our yard earlier in the day.  The fla...

Deer Tick; Black-Legged tick Ixodes scapularis May 23, 2008 I pulled this tiny Deer Tick out of my husband's leg, he found it after mowing the grass. Ironically, we had seen 3 deer in our yard earlier in the day. The fla...

Deer Tick; Black-Legged tick Ixodes scapularis May 23, 2008 I pulled this tiny Deer Tick out of my husband's leg, he found it after mowing the grass. Ironically, we had seen 3 deer in our yard earlier in the day. The flat, barbed mouthpart is visible in the middle of the head. Ticks often secrete "cementum" to help anchor them as they feed. It is important to always get the head out when removing a tick. When these critters bite, they inject neurotoxin-containing saliva which keeps the host from feeling them as they feed. The saliva may have a blood thinner, which not only makes it easier for the tick to eat, but it often causes an allergic reaction, resulting in intense itching (which can be awkward to scratch in the places where ticks seem to prefer, if you get my drift!). I once got into a "nest" of tick larvae (or nymphs) during one of my outings. There were hundreds of tiny ticks on my thighs and middle section. I am very allergic to tick venom, they caused me to have severe itching where I had been bitten. I bruised my thighs from scratching them in my sleep. It finally took a round of steroids to relieve the itching. Some helpful tick websites: Tick Information Tick Diseases 3276
69 This is a photo of <strong>Lyme Disease</strong>. My son contracted it when he was bitten by deer ticks while riding his bike on a woodland trail. These "bulls-eye" rashes are the the tell-tail signs of this dangerous disease. Fortunately, it is easily...

This is a photo of Lyme Disease. My son contracted it when he was bitten by deer ticks while riding his bike on a woodland trail. These "bulls-eye" rashes are the the tell-tail signs of this dangerous disease. Fortunately, it is easily...

This is a photo of Lyme Disease. My son contracted it when he was bitten by deer ticks while riding his bike on a woodland trail. These "bulls-eye" rashes are the the tell-tail signs of this dangerous disease. Fortunately, it is easily treated with antibiotics if caught early enough. Curtis was bitten on a Thursday afternoon and by Tuesday morning he had this rash, a round of antibiotics quickly cleared it up. 9033
70 <strong>American Dog Tick; Wood Tick</strong> (male?)
<em>Dermacentor variabilis</em>
Great Smoky Mountains National Park
May 10, 2008

After hiking in the Smokies, I noticed this tick crawling on my friend's shirt. I put it on a wall and photogra...

American Dog Tick; Wood Tick (male?) Dermacentor variabilis Great Smoky Mountains National Park May 10, 2008 After hiking in the Smokies, I noticed this tick crawling on my friend's shirt. I put it on a wall and photogra...

American Dog Tick; Wood Tick (male?) Dermacentor variabilis Great Smoky Mountains National Park May 10, 2008 After hiking in the Smokies, I noticed this tick crawling on my friend's shirt. I put it on a wall and photographed it with my macro lens. Ticks are tough and amazing little critters. Any animal that can live for nearly two years between meals has to be admired for their patience! These ticks usually don't feed on humans. In the early stages of their life cycle they feed on rodents, the adults feed on the blood of dogs. 2884
71 <strong>Harvestman; Daddy Longlegs</strong>
<em>Leiobunum</em> sp. / Order: Opiliones

It was interesting to see this Daddy Long-legs eating a fly along the Cumberland Trail. These spider relatives, a.k.a. "Harvestmen," are harmless to humans. Do no...

Harvestman; Daddy Longlegs Leiobunum sp. / Order: Opiliones It was interesting to see this Daddy Long-legs eating a fly along the Cumberland Trail. These spider relatives, a.k.a. "Harvestmen," are harmless to humans. Do no...

Harvestman; Daddy Longlegs Leiobunum sp. / Order: Opiliones It was interesting to see this Daddy Long-legs eating a fly along the Cumberland Trail. These spider relatives, a.k.a. "Harvestmen," are harmless to humans. Do not believe the widespread urban myth that they are "the most venomous spiders in the world, but their fangs are too short to inject the venom in human skin." This is NOT true!!! They are not spiders and they do not have fangs or venom. They eat the fluids from living insects and sometimes dead animals and even juices from plants. Most of their sense organs are located in their long, skinny legs. If you still don't believe me, check out this website: Daddy Longlegs Myth 2525
72 The head of a Daddy Longlegs. Isn't that a cute face?! :)

The head of a Daddy Longlegs. Isn't that a cute face?! :)

The head of a Daddy Longlegs. Isn't that a cute face?! :) 2051
73 Even "creepy crawlies" like Daddy Longlegs can be plagued by parasites like this tiny red mite (another arachnid).

Even "creepy crawlies" like Daddy Longlegs can be plagued by parasites like this tiny red mite (another arachnid).

Even "creepy crawlies" like Daddy Longlegs can be plagued by parasites like this tiny red mite (another arachnid). 1583
74 Close-up of Red Mite on a Daddy longlegs' leg. I guess you could say this guy is "full as a tick"! This is the juvenile form of the mite, it will fall off after it is finished eating to molt and become an adult.

Close-up of Red Mite on a Daddy longlegs' leg. I guess you could say this guy is "full as a tick"! This is the juvenile form of the mite, it will fall off after it is finished eating to molt and become an adult.

Close-up of Red Mite on a Daddy longlegs' leg. I guess you could say this guy is "full as a tick"! This is the juvenile form of the mite, it will fall off after it is finished eating to molt and become an adult. 1647
75 <strong>Erythraeid Mite</strong> 
<em>Leptus</em> spp.

This Daddy-longlegs has been parasitized by tiny red <strong>Erythraeid Mite</strong> larvae.

Erythraeid Mite Leptus spp. This Daddy-longlegs has been parasitized by tiny red Erythraeid Mite larvae.

Erythraeid Mite Leptus spp. This Daddy-longlegs has been parasitized by tiny red Erythraeid Mite larvae. 2003
76 <strong>Predatory Mite and a Springtail</strong>
Oak Ridge, TN
March 15, 2009

This is a heavily-cropped photo. These two tiny creatures (1mm) were floating on water in an abandoned cooler on a soccer field! The mites (right) were feeding on the sp...

Predatory Mite and a Springtail Oak Ridge, TN March 15, 2009 This is a heavily-cropped photo. These two tiny creatures (1mm) were floating on water in an abandoned cooler on a soccer field! The mites (right) were feeding on the sp...

Predatory Mite and a Springtail Oak Ridge, TN March 15, 2009 This is a heavily-cropped photo. These two tiny creatures (1mm) were floating on water in an abandoned cooler on a soccer field! The mites (right) were feeding on the springtails. They were quite a sight to see with their neon-orange legs! 2977
77 <strong>Desert Tarantula</strong> 
<em>Aphonopelma chaleodes</em>
Las Cruces, NM
Oct. 7, 2008

We were thrilled to find this handsome tarantula while we were hiking in the Organ Mountains of New Mexico. There were a lot of these fellows out on the...

Desert Tarantula Aphonopelma chaleodes Las Cruces, NM Oct. 7, 2008 We were thrilled to find this handsome tarantula while we were hiking in the Organ Mountains of New Mexico. There were a lot of these fellows out on the...

Desert Tarantula Aphonopelma chaleodes Las Cruces, NM Oct. 7, 2008 We were thrilled to find this handsome tarantula while we were hiking in the Organ Mountains of New Mexico. There were a lot of these fellows out on the prowl, looking for females! 2674
78 <strong>Eastern Stripeless Scorpion</strong>
<em>Vaejovis carolinianus</em>
Coalfield, TN
June 2, 2008
These small scorpions are found it the woodlands of east Tennessee, however I have never come across one. One of the girls at science camp brough...

Eastern Stripeless Scorpion Vaejovis carolinianus Coalfield, TN June 2, 2008 These small scorpions are found it the woodlands of east Tennessee, however I have never come across one. One of the girls at science camp brough...

Eastern Stripeless Scorpion Vaejovis carolinianus Coalfield, TN June 2, 2008 These small scorpions are found it the woodlands of east Tennessee, however I have never come across one. One of the girls at science camp brought this one so I could get a photo. 4075

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