All photographs copyright (2003-2013) by Kris H. Light

Although the <strong>Venus Fly Trap</strong> (<em>Dionaea muscipula</em>) is not a "critter", I am adding it to this gallery since it does <u>eat</u> critters, such as flies and insects. This is a plant that I bought at a grocery store. Carnivorous Ven...
Although the Venus Fly Trap (Dionaea muscipula) is not a "critter", I am adding it to this gallery since it does eat critters, such as flies and insects. This is a plant that I bought at a grocery store. Carnivorous Venus Fly Traps grow wild in the wetlands of North Carolina, where they are protected. You can buy these plants with a clear conscience, they are grown in vitro in a test tube or Petri dish! Note the reddish hue and little trigger hairs on the leaf pads. The red color on the leaf pads attracts flies and other insects. An insect has to touch 2 of the 3 hairs in order to cause the pads to close; this prevents accidental closure. Digestive enzymes in the leaf pads help the plant get the needed nutrients from the trapped insect. I feed fruitflies to mine, using a pin to put them in the leaves. To better understand the closing mechanism check this website:
Venus Fly Trap info

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