All photographs copyright (2003-2013) by Kris H. Light

<strong>Monk's Hood</strong>
<em>Aconitum uncinatum</em> / Buttercup Family
Mount Leconte, Great Smoky Mountains National Park
September 1, 2006<br>
I hiked 5-1/2 miles up the Alum Bluff Trail in the Smokies in hopes of seeing 3 wildflowers --- thi...
Monk's Hood
Aconitum uncinatum / Buttercup Family
Mount Leconte, Great Smoky Mountains National Park
September 1, 2006

I hiked 5-1/2 miles up the Alum Bluff Trail in the Smokies in hopes of seeing 3 wildflowers --- this was one of them! Monk's Hood gets its name from the unusual shape of the petals. I saw these blooming in front of the dining hall at the Mount Leconte Lodge. Like all Aconitums, this plant is poisonous, it contains aconitine. The plant is also known as "wolfsbane"; any plant with "bane" in the name is probably poisonous. Two other species are common in Alaska, when we were there in 2004, we were told to avoid eating any bright purple flowers (as if we were going to eat the wildflowers!).
Perennial
Where seen: high elevations of Great Smoky Mountains

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