Reptiles and Amphibians

This site contains photos of snakes, lizards, turtles, toads, and salamanders.
Image Number Image (Click to Enlarge)CaptionImage Viewed
1 <strong>Bullfrog</strong>
<em>Rana catesbeiana</em>
This is the largest frog in North America, it can grow up to 8". I photographed this female in the pond at Ijams Nature Center in Knoxville. I saw some huge tadpoles in the pond too. Females have a ...

Bullfrog Rana catesbeiana This is the largest frog in North America, it can grow up to 8". I photographed this female in the pond at Ijams Nature Center in Knoxville. I saw some huge tadpoles in the pond too. Females have a ...

Bullfrog Rana catesbeiana This is the largest frog in North America, it can grow up to 8". I photographed this female in the pond at Ijams Nature Center in Knoxville. I saw some huge tadpoles in the pond too. Females have a smaller tympanum (flat circular spot behind the eye) than males. Frogs have smooth skin and are more aquatic than toads. A good website for identifying Tennessee frogs and toads is: http://www.leaps.ms/namepage.htm A good website for frog calls is: frog calls 3194
2 I found these <strong>Frog eggs</strong> floating in a huge puddle in the middle of the dirt road at Piney Falls. It is easy to tell the difference between frog eggs and toad eggs --- frog eggs are laid in clumps and toad eggs are laid in strings. The ...

I found these Frog eggs floating in a huge puddle in the middle of the dirt road at Piney Falls. It is easy to tell the difference between frog eggs and toad eggs --- frog eggs are laid in clumps and toad eggs are laid in strings. The ...

I found these Frog eggs floating in a huge puddle in the middle of the dirt road at Piney Falls. It is easy to tell the difference between frog eggs and toad eggs --- frog eggs are laid in clumps and toad eggs are laid in strings. The little black dots in the eggs are the undeveloped tadpoles. Frogs lay huge numbers of eggs to ensure that a few of the tadpoles can survive to become adult frogs. There is a high mortality rate among tadpoles, they are eaten by birds, fish, and sometimes even other tadpoles. 2675
3 I was surprised to find these <strong>Tadpoles</strong> swimming in a small pond at the Oil Museum in Taft, CA. Tadpoles are herbivores, they eat algae. They go through metamorphosis, changing from a no-legged, fish-like gill-breathing, herbivorous cre...

I was surprised to find these Tadpoles swimming in a small pond at the Oil Museum in Taft, CA. Tadpoles are herbivores, they eat algae. They go through metamorphosis, changing from a no-legged, fish-like gill-breathing, herbivorous cre...

I was surprised to find these Tadpoles swimming in a small pond at the Oil Museum in Taft, CA. Tadpoles are herbivores, they eat algae. They go through metamorphosis, changing from a no-legged, fish-like gill-breathing, herbivorous creature to a 4-legged, air-breathing, carnivorous frog. Adult frogs eat insects and some other larger animals. 2281
4 I photographed these large Tadpoles in the little pond at the University of Tennessee Arboretum. They are well camouflaged and they quickly hide in the mud when they detect danger.

I photographed these large Tadpoles in the little pond at the University of Tennessee Arboretum. They are well camouflaged and they quickly hide in the mud when they detect danger.

I photographed these large Tadpoles in the little pond at the University of Tennessee Arboretum. They are well camouflaged and they quickly hide in the mud when they detect danger. 1877
5 This large tadpole has grown small hind legs, soon it wiil develop front legs too. I photographed it in the pond at Ijams Nature Center in late July. Bullfrog tadpoles can take up to 3 years to develop into frogs!

This large tadpole has grown small hind legs, soon it wiil develop front legs too. I photographed it in the pond at Ijams Nature Center in late July. Bullfrog tadpoles can take up to 3 years to develop into frogs!

This large tadpole has grown small hind legs, soon it wiil develop front legs too. I photographed it in the pond at Ijams Nature Center in late July. Bullfrog tadpoles can take up to 3 years to develop into frogs! 2064
6 I wish this froglet had not been partially hidden by the waterlily leaf, although it had grown its legs, it still had part of its' tail. The froglet also still had the coloration of the tadpole.

I wish this froglet had not been partially hidden by the waterlily leaf, although it had grown its legs, it still had part of its' tail. The froglet also still had the coloration of the tadpole.

I wish this froglet had not been partially hidden by the waterlily leaf, although it had grown its legs, it still had part of its' tail. The froglet also still had the coloration of the tadpole. 1622
7 This Froglet still has a stump of a tail, pretty soon it will be an adult. I photographed it in a pond at Haw Ridge, a great hiking area in Oak Ridge.

This Froglet still has a stump of a tail, pretty soon it will be an adult. I photographed it in a pond at Haw Ridge, a great hiking area in Oak Ridge.

This Froglet still has a stump of a tail, pretty soon it will be an adult. I photographed it in a pond at Haw Ridge, a great hiking area in Oak Ridge. 1756
8 I photographed this Bull Frog at Ijams Nature Center. It was nearly the same color as the algae it was sitting on.

I photographed this Bull Frog at Ijams Nature Center. It was nearly the same color as the algae it was sitting on.

I photographed this Bull Frog at Ijams Nature Center. It was nearly the same color as the algae it was sitting on. 1897
9 <strong>Spring Peeper Frog</strong>
<em>Pseudacris crucifer</em>
One of the girls at science camp found this tiny frog in a field near a wet-weather wetland. Peepers are less than an inch long. I had a hard time getting this picture, sometimes I have...

Spring Peeper Frog Pseudacris crucifer One of the girls at science camp found this tiny frog in a field near a wet-weather wetland. Peepers are less than an inch long. I had a hard time getting this picture, sometimes I have...

Spring Peeper Frog Pseudacris crucifer One of the girls at science camp found this tiny frog in a field near a wet-weather wetland. Peepers are less than an inch long. I had a hard time getting this picture, sometimes I have to get a photo whenever, wherever and however I can get it! I love to hear these little frogs as they sing their courting songs early in the spring. 2202
10 <strong>Gray Treefrog</strong>
<em>Hyla versicolor</em>
June 30, 2007
When we went to a friend's 50th birthday party one evening, I sure didn't think this would be the type of "wildlife" I would be photographing! :) They don't emerge and start calli...

Gray Treefrog Hyla versicolor June 30, 2007 When we went to a friend's 50th birthday party one evening, I sure didn't think this would be the type of "wildlife" I would be photographing! :) They don't emerge and start calli...

Gray Treefrog Hyla versicolor June 30, 2007 When we went to a friend's 50th birthday party one evening, I sure didn't think this would be the type of "wildlife" I would be photographing! :) They don't emerge and start calling until after dark, so I had to use a flash in this photo. My friends have a little pond on their patio that attracts these guys. This male frog is perched on a rose bush, I wonder how he avoids those sharp thorns?! It is easy to tell that he is a tree frog due to the little pads on the toes. Males woo the females by singing (croaking) as they inflate the throat pouch (see following photo). Their call sounds a lot like a bird chirping, if you hear what sounds like a bird chirping after the sun has set on a warm summer evening, it is probably one of these little frogs. If the cryptic coloration of these frogs doesn't hide them well enough, they also have bright gold-yellow "flashes" under their thighs which are revealed when they jump used to confuse a predator. 2046
11 I caught this Gray Tree frog while it was croaking! It is amazing how large the throat pouch can enlarge!

I caught this Gray Tree frog while it was croaking! It is amazing how large the throat pouch can enlarge!

I caught this Gray Tree frog while it was croaking! It is amazing how large the throat pouch can enlarge! 1898
12 <strong>American Green Tree Frog</strong>
<em>Hyla cinerea</em>

This cute little green frog likes to hang out on the sliding screen door near the porch light at my parents' house in Florida. I'm sure he gets lots of nice moths to eat each night.

American Green Tree Frog Hyla cinerea This cute little green frog likes to hang out on the sliding screen door near the porch light at my parents' house in Florida. I'm sure he gets lots of nice moths to eat each night.

American Green Tree Frog Hyla cinerea This cute little green frog likes to hang out on the sliding screen door near the porch light at my parents' house in Florida. I'm sure he gets lots of nice moths to eat each night. 2958
13 I paid dearly for this close-up photo of a tiny <strong>Green Tree Frog</strong>. I had to lay flat on my stomach on a wooden deck at the house my son and daughter-in-law rented when they got married on St. George Is., Florida (May 2010). I knew immedi...

I paid dearly for this close-up photo of a tiny Green Tree Frog. I had to lay flat on my stomach on a wooden deck at the house my son and daughter-in-law rented when they got married on St. George Is., Florida (May 2010). I knew immedi...

I paid dearly for this close-up photo of a tiny Green Tree Frog. I had to lay flat on my stomach on a wooden deck at the house my son and daughter-in-law rented when they got married on St. George Is., Florida (May 2010). I knew immediately when I felt a painful jab in my big toe that I had rammed a splinter into it! At 1/2" long and being on the bottom of my toe, it was not easy or a lot of fun to pull out. But I was happy when I saw the photo of the cute little frog. :) 2289
14 This <strong>Green Frog</strong> (<em>Lithobates clamitans</em>, previously <em>Rana clamitans</em>) lives in an artificial pond at a friend's house. It must be used to people, it didn't flinch when I got my camera within a foot away.

This Green Frog (Lithobates clamitans, previously Rana clamitans) lives in an artificial pond at a friend's house. It must be used to people, it didn't flinch when I got my camera within a foot away.

This Green Frog (Lithobates clamitans, previously Rana clamitans) lives in an artificial pond at a friend's house. It must be used to people, it didn't flinch when I got my camera within a foot away. 2156
15 <strong>Green Frog</strong>
<em>Rana clamitans</em>
Knoxville, TN (Ijams Nature Center)
May 31, 2010

This frog sounds like an off-key banjo string!

Green Frog Rana clamitans Knoxville, TN (Ijams Nature Center) May 31, 2010 This frog sounds like an off-key banjo string!

Green Frog Rana clamitans Knoxville, TN (Ijams Nature Center) May 31, 2010 This frog sounds like an off-key banjo string! 1388
16 <strong>American Toad</strong>
<em>Bufo americanus</em>
Oak Ridge, TN
May 2008

It is easy to see the poison-filled glands behind this Toad's eyes. This guy is probably one of the "survivors" of the numerous tadpoles kids bring to school to releas...

American Toad Bufo americanus Oak Ridge, TN May 2008 It is easy to see the poison-filled glands behind this Toad's eyes. This guy is probably one of the "survivors" of the numerous tadpoles kids bring to school to releas...

American Toad Bufo americanus Oak Ridge, TN May 2008 It is easy to see the poison-filled glands behind this Toad's eyes. This guy is probably one of the "survivors" of the numerous tadpoles kids bring to school to release in the pond of the "Secret Garden". I'm sure the goldfish get fed quite well each spring! 1746
17 My husband put a penny by this Toad so I could show how small this little guy was. Like salamanders, toads have poisonous skin. The "warts" on a toad contain the poison which is released if an animal tries to eat it. We found this toad along the trail ...

My husband put a penny by this Toad so I could show how small this little guy was. Like salamanders, toads have poisonous skin. The "warts" on a toad contain the poison which is released if an animal tries to eat it. We found this toad along the trail ...

My husband put a penny by this Toad so I could show how small this little guy was. Like salamanders, toads have poisonous skin. The "warts" on a toad contain the poison which is released if an animal tries to eat it. We found this toad along the trail at Big Ridge State Park. Contrary to the old wives' tale, toads and frogs cannot give a person warts (they are caused by a virus)! 2495
18 Kenny and I found this injured Toad on the trail below Piney Falls. Something had bitten it, we saw blood and the white liquid on its skin. The bumps on a toad's skin contains a poisonous white fluid which oozes out when it is disturbed.

Kenny and I found this injured Toad on the trail below Piney Falls. Something had bitten it, we saw blood and the white liquid on its skin. The bumps on a toad's skin contains a poisonous white fluid which oozes out when it is disturbed.

Kenny and I found this injured Toad on the trail below Piney Falls. Something had bitten it, we saw blood and the white liquid on its skin. The bumps on a toad's skin contains a poisonous white fluid which oozes out when it is disturbed. 1830
19 <strong>Eastern Red-spotted Newt</strong>
<em>Notopthalalamus viridescens viridescens</em>
Oak Ridge,TN 
May 2008
There are many of these newts in a pond at Haw Ridge.

Eastern Red-spotted Newt Notopthalalamus viridescens viridescens Oak Ridge,TN May 2008 There are many of these newts in a pond at Haw Ridge.

Eastern Red-spotted Newt Notopthalalamus viridescens viridescens Oak Ridge,TN May 2008 There are many of these newts in a pond at Haw Ridge. 2219
20 One of the kids from Science Camp caught this little Salamander larva during the Stream Ecology class. The larvae have feathery gills (on the head just in front of the front legs) to breathe in the water.

One of the kids from Science Camp caught this little Salamander larva during the Stream Ecology class. The larvae have feathery gills (on the head just in front of the front legs) to breathe in the water.

One of the kids from Science Camp caught this little Salamander larva during the Stream Ecology class. The larvae have feathery gills (on the head just in front of the front legs) to breathe in the water. 1803
21 This Red Eft is the "teenage" stage of an Eastern Red-spotted Newt. The bright colors are a warning to predators. Most amphibians have poisonous skin. I found this one at Frozen Head State Park in early May. The Smoky Mountains are the "Salamander Capi...

This Red Eft is the "teenage" stage of an Eastern Red-spotted Newt. The bright colors are a warning to predators. Most amphibians have poisonous skin. I found this one at Frozen Head State Park in early May. The Smoky Mountains are the "Salamander Capi...

This Red Eft is the "teenage" stage of an Eastern Red-spotted Newt. The bright colors are a warning to predators. Most amphibians have poisonous skin. I found this one at Frozen Head State Park in early May. The Smoky Mountains are the "Salamander Capital of the World" with more species than any other place. 2318
22 I got a kick out of this little Red eft hiding under a leaf at Frozen Head State Park!

I got a kick out of this little Red eft hiding under a leaf at Frozen Head State Park!

I got a kick out of this little Red eft hiding under a leaf at Frozen Head State Park! 1945
23 <strong>Hellbender</strong>
<em>Cryptobranchus alleganiensis</em>
I once went snorkeling in a mountain stream in the Smokies in search of one of these huge salamanders. I nearly became hypothermic due to the cold water, even though it was the middle ...

Hellbender Cryptobranchus alleganiensis I once went snorkeling in a mountain stream in the Smokies in search of one of these huge salamanders. I nearly became hypothermic due to the cold water, even though it was the middle ...

Hellbender Cryptobranchus alleganiensis I once went snorkeling in a mountain stream in the Smokies in search of one of these huge salamanders. I nearly became hypothermic due to the cold water, even though it was the middle of July! These large salamanders can grow to nearly 30 inches in length. They have very slimy skin and are sometimes called "snot otters"! They eat small fish, crawfish, worms, mollusks, and insects. I photographed this one in an exhibit at the Tennessee Aquarium in Chattanooga. It was a low exhibit, so I had to sit on the floor to take this picture. 2648
24 <strong>Northern Red Salamander</strong> 
<em>Pseudotriton ruber ruber</em>
Oak Ridge, TN
June 6, 2008

A couple of the kids at the AMSE science camp found this beautiful salamder in the creek during the Stream Ecology class (which explains why it...

Northern Red Salamander Pseudotriton ruber ruber Oak Ridge, TN June 6, 2008 A couple of the kids at the AMSE science camp found this beautiful salamder in the creek during the Stream Ecology class (which explains why it...

Northern Red Salamander Pseudotriton ruber ruber Oak Ridge, TN June 6, 2008 A couple of the kids at the AMSE science camp found this beautiful salamder in the creek during the Stream Ecology class (which explains why it is trying to crawl out of a white pan!). 1977
25 <strong>Red-cheeked Salamander </strong>
<em>Plethodon jordani</em>
Great Smoky Mountains National Park
Aug. 9, 2008

The Smokies have more different kinds of salamanders than anywhere else in the world. This one is the "poster amphibian" of the p...

Red-cheeked Salamander Plethodon jordani Great Smoky Mountains National Park Aug. 9, 2008 The Smokies have more different kinds of salamanders than anywhere else in the world. This one is the "poster amphibian" of the p...

Red-cheeked Salamander Plethodon jordani Great Smoky Mountains National Park Aug. 9, 2008 The Smokies have more different kinds of salamanders than anywhere else in the world. This one is the "poster amphibian" of the park! 1797
26 <strong>Fence Lizard</strong>
<em>Sceloporus undulatus</em>
This tiny lizard was on my husband's backpack when we sat on the Angel Falls Overlook at Big South Fork. Kenny caught it to put it back on the pine tree. It stayed still on his hand for a fe...

Fence Lizard Sceloporus undulatus This tiny lizard was on my husband's backpack when we sat on the Angel Falls Overlook at Big South Fork. Kenny caught it to put it back on the pine tree. It stayed still on his hand for a fe...

Fence Lizard Sceloporus undulatus This tiny lizard was on my husband's backpack when we sat on the Angel Falls Overlook at Big South Fork. Kenny caught it to put it back on the pine tree. It stayed still on his hand for a few minutes. The second he put it back on the bark, the lizard scurried around the tree! I was glad I had taken my pictures! 3738
27 <strong>Eastern Fence Lizard</strong>
<em>Sceloporus undulatus</em>
Munson, FL
Dec. 26, 2008

I spotted this little lizard on a fallen log while we were hiking at Blackwater River State Park in Munson, FL. It was a surprise to find it on the day a...

Eastern Fence Lizard Sceloporus undulatus Munson, FL Dec. 26, 2008 I spotted this little lizard on a fallen log while we were hiking at Blackwater River State Park in Munson, FL. It was a surprise to find it on the day a...

Eastern Fence Lizard Sceloporus undulatus Munson, FL Dec. 26, 2008 I spotted this little lizard on a fallen log while we were hiking at Blackwater River State Park in Munson, FL. It was a surprise to find it on the day after Christmas. It was very patient to let me get so close! 2274
28 Eastern Fence Lizard - male

I photographed this guy at House Mountain State Natural Area on April 10, 2010.

Eastern Fence Lizard - male I photographed this guy at House Mountain State Natural Area on April 10, 2010.

Eastern Fence Lizard - male I photographed this guy at House Mountain State Natural Area on April 10, 2010. 1743
29 I just love this picture of the lizard I found at Big South Fork on an unseasonably warm December day in 2006. It was sunning itself on a log and seemed to be unfazed by a camera lens zooming in on it!

I just love this picture of the lizard I found at Big South Fork on an unseasonably warm December day in 2006. It was sunning itself on a log and seemed to be unfazed by a camera lens zooming in on it!

I just love this picture of the lizard I found at Big South Fork on an unseasonably warm December day in 2006. It was sunning itself on a log and seemed to be unfazed by a camera lens zooming in on it! 1896
30 <strong>Green Anole</strong>
<em>Anolis carolinensis</em>
Munson, FL
Sept. 1, 2007
I found this anole on a marsh plant while I was photographing dragonflies at Blackwater River State Park. These lizards can change color from green to brown in secon...

Green Anole Anolis carolinensis Munson, FL Sept. 1, 2007 I found this anole on a marsh plant while I was photographing dragonflies at Blackwater River State Park. These lizards can change color from green to brown in secon...

Green Anole Anolis carolinensis Munson, FL Sept. 1, 2007 I found this anole on a marsh plant while I was photographing dragonflies at Blackwater River State Park. These lizards can change color from green to brown in seconds if necessary. The males have a bright throatfan that can be inflated to attract a mate or intimidate rival males. Anoles eat insects and spiders. 1815
31 This male <strong>Green Anole</strong> had inflated his <em>dewlap</em>, most likely in an attempt to intimidate my daughter-in-law and me when we startled it as we walked on the boardwalk from the beach. I had my macro lens on my camera, so I wasn't a...

This male Green Anole had inflated his dewlap, most likely in an attempt to intimidate my daughter-in-law and me when we startled it as we walked on the boardwalk from the beach. I had my macro lens on my camera, so I wasn't a...

This male Green Anole had inflated his dewlap, most likely in an attempt to intimidate my daughter-in-law and me when we startled it as we walked on the boardwalk from the beach. I had my macro lens on my camera, so I wasn't able to get as good a shot as I would have liked, but sometimes I have to take what I can! 1763
32 <strong>Brown Anole</strong>
<em>Anolis sagrei</em>
Munson, FL
Dec. 26, 2008

This was another little reptile we saw on our hike at Blackwater River SP in Munson. Like the Green Anole, these lizards can change color from light to dark brown. This ...

Brown Anole Anolis sagrei Munson, FL Dec. 26, 2008 This was another little reptile we saw on our hike at Blackwater River SP in Munson. Like the Green Anole, these lizards can change color from light to dark brown. This ...

Brown Anole Anolis sagrei Munson, FL Dec. 26, 2008 This was another little reptile we saw on our hike at Blackwater River SP in Munson. Like the Green Anole, these lizards can change color from light to dark brown. This one is a female, distinguished by the yellow stripe on her back. 1795
33 I found this shy young <strong>Eastern Box Turtle</strong> (<em>Terrapene carolina</em>)while I was on one of my wildflower searches. If the eyes were clearly visible it would be possible to tell if this is a male or female. Male box turtles have reddi...

I found this shy young Eastern Box Turtle (Terrapene carolina)while I was on one of my wildflower searches. If the eyes were clearly visible it would be possible to tell if this is a male or female. Male box turtles have reddi...

I found this shy young Eastern Box Turtle (Terrapene carolina)while I was on one of my wildflower searches. If the eyes were clearly visible it would be possible to tell if this is a male or female. Male box turtles have reddish orange eyes, females have gold eyes. On a male, the underneath part of the shell, the "plastron," is concave, it is flat on a female. Box turtles are omnivores, they eat both plants and animals, such as earthworms, slugs, berries, and even poisonous mushrooms. 2412
34 I found this Box turtle at the Jefferson Middle School Cedar Barrens.

I found this Box turtle at the Jefferson Middle School Cedar Barrens.

I found this Box turtle at the Jefferson Middle School Cedar Barrens. 2119
35 Note the growth rings on the <em>scutes</em> on this Box Turtle's shell.

Note the growth rings on the scutes on this Box Turtle's shell.

Note the growth rings on the scutes on this Box Turtle's shell. 3009
36 <strong>Red-eared Slider Turtles; Pond Sliders</strong>
<em>Chrysemys scripta</em>

These turtles were photographed at the turtle enclosure of Bays Mountain in Kingspsort, TN. When I was a child I remember these turtles being sold as pets. Turtles d...

Red-eared Slider Turtles; Pond Sliders Chrysemys scripta These turtles were photographed at the turtle enclosure of Bays Mountain in Kingspsort, TN. When I was a child I remember these turtles being sold as pets. Turtles d...

Red-eared Slider Turtles; Pond Sliders Chrysemys scripta These turtles were photographed at the turtle enclosure of Bays Mountain in Kingspsort, TN. When I was a child I remember these turtles being sold as pets. Turtles don't make good pets because they can carry the dangerous bacterium Salmonella. Children can become very ill if they handle an infected turtle then put their hands in their mouth. 2661
37 I photographed this Red-eared Slider Turtle laying her eggs at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge in Olympia, WA in June 2009. I had tried to catch her in the act of depositing an egg a few times before getting this shot, I got lucky, this was her ...

I photographed this Red-eared Slider Turtle laying her eggs at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge in Olympia, WA in June 2009. I had tried to catch her in the act of depositing an egg a few times before getting this shot, I got lucky, this was her ...

I photographed this Red-eared Slider Turtle laying her eggs at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge in Olympia, WA in June 2009. I had tried to catch her in the act of depositing an egg a few times before getting this shot, I got lucky, this was her last egg! I just hope the raccoons or skunks don't find her nest. (See next photo) These turtles are not native to that area. 2175
38 The little white curled objects on the ground in front of hole are the shells of Turtle eggs. Since this nest was so far from water, my guess is that it was a Box Turtle nest. Raccoons and skunks are notorious for digging up turtle nests and eating the...

The little white curled objects on the ground in front of hole are the shells of Turtle eggs. Since this nest was so far from water, my guess is that it was a Box Turtle nest. Raccoons and skunks are notorious for digging up turtle nests and eating the...

The little white curled objects on the ground in front of hole are the shells of Turtle eggs. Since this nest was so far from water, my guess is that it was a Box Turtle nest. Raccoons and skunks are notorious for digging up turtle nests and eating the eggs. We find this often at our summer science camp. Fortunately, turtles lay large numbers of eggs, so if a few nests are undisturbed there will still be plenty of turtle hatchlings to carry on. 2285
39 <strong>Snapping Turtle</strong>
<em>Chelydra serpentina</em>
This big guy was photographed through the glass wall of a tank at Ijams Nature Center. These turtles are formidible creatures with incredibly strong jaws and long, sharp claws. Alligator S...

Snapping Turtle Chelydra serpentina This big guy was photographed through the glass wall of a tank at Ijams Nature Center. These turtles are formidible creatures with incredibly strong jaws and long, sharp claws. Alligator S...

Snapping Turtle Chelydra serpentina This big guy was photographed through the glass wall of a tank at Ijams Nature Center. These turtles are formidible creatures with incredibly strong jaws and long, sharp claws. Alligator Snapping Turtles have a worm-like projection it their mouth which they use as a lure to attract fish, when the fish comes up to investigate --- SNAP!!!; instead of getting a meal, they become one! An old legend says that once a Snapping turtle clamps down it won't let go until it hears thunder. 2364
40 This baby <strong>Snapping Turtle</strong> (<em>Chelydra serpentina</em>) was found partially buried in the mud in a puddle in the middle of the trail to Piney River. It was about 2 inches long. At first I thought it was a salamander because I could se...

This baby Snapping Turtle (Chelydra serpentina) was found partially buried in the mud in a puddle in the middle of the trail to Piney River. It was about 2 inches long. At first I thought it was a salamander because I could se...

This baby Snapping Turtle (Chelydra serpentina) was found partially buried in the mud in a puddle in the middle of the trail to Piney River. It was about 2 inches long. At first I thought it was a salamander because I could see just its head, I sure got a surprise when I saw that it had a shell! Luckily, this little guy didn't try to bite me! 2383
41 These turtles are basking on a log in order to warm their bodies. Reptiles are cold-blooded (<em>exothermic</em> - "outside heat"), meaning their body temperature is the same as the water or air around them. If they remain in the cooler, deeper water f...

These turtles are basking on a log in order to warm their bodies. Reptiles are cold-blooded (exothermic - "outside heat"), meaning their body temperature is the same as the water or air around them. If they remain in the cooler, deeper water f...

These turtles are basking on a log in order to warm their bodies. Reptiles are cold-blooded (exothermic - "outside heat"), meaning their body temperature is the same as the water or air around them. If they remain in the cooler, deeper water for long they have to bask in the sun for awhile to warm up. 1580
42 <strong>Eastern Mud Turtle</strong>
<em>Kinosternon subrubrum</em>
Oak Ridge, TN
June 9, 2009

We caught this little turtle in a net trap during Science Camp. It, along with 4 other turtles, a bluegill and 2 catfish, was attracted to the smoked Vi...

Eastern Mud Turtle Kinosternon subrubrum Oak Ridge, TN June 9, 2009 We caught this little turtle in a net trap during Science Camp. It, along with 4 other turtles, a bluegill and 2 catfish, was attracted to the smoked Vi...

Eastern Mud Turtle Kinosternon subrubrum Oak Ridge, TN June 9, 2009 We caught this little turtle in a net trap during Science Camp. It, along with 4 other turtles, a bluegill and 2 catfish, was attracted to the smoked Vienna sausages we used to bait the trap over night! I wish its shell wasn't so overgrown with algae. 1681
43 Since turtles are reptiles they have to breathe air. They can stay under water for quite awhile, but eventually they have to surface. Aquatic turtles also have to lay their eggs on land.

Since turtles are reptiles they have to breathe air. They can stay under water for quite awhile, but eventually they have to surface. Aquatic turtles also have to lay their eggs on land.

Since turtles are reptiles they have to breathe air. They can stay under water for quite awhile, but eventually they have to surface. Aquatic turtles also have to lay their eggs on land. 2335
44 <strong>Eastern Spiny Softshell Turtle</strong>
<em>Apalone spinifera spinifera</em>
Ijams Naure Center
August 2, 2007
This is one really strange-looking turtle. Most of the time it stays buried in the sand with just its nostrils sticking out of th...

Eastern Spiny Softshell Turtle Apalone spinifera spinifera Ijams Naure Center August 2, 2007 This is one really strange-looking turtle. Most of the time it stays buried in the sand with just its nostrils sticking out of th...

Eastern Spiny Softshell Turtle Apalone spinifera spinifera Ijams Naure Center August 2, 2007 This is one really strange-looking turtle. Most of the time it stays buried in the sand with just its nostrils sticking out of the sand. Wait around long enough and it will have to come to the surface to breathe. These types of turtles have a soft, leathery shell. 3315
45 <strong>Eastern Spiny Softshell Turtle</strong> 

I photographed this turtle at Ijams Nature Center. I had to wait awhile because it was buried under the sand with just its' nostrils showing. I knew if I waited long enough it would have to surface to...

Eastern Spiny Softshell Turtle I photographed this turtle at Ijams Nature Center. I had to wait awhile because it was buried under the sand with just its' nostrils showing. I knew if I waited long enough it would have to surface to...

Eastern Spiny Softshell Turtle I photographed this turtle at Ijams Nature Center. I had to wait awhile because it was buried under the sand with just its' nostrils showing. I knew if I waited long enough it would have to surface to breathe. These turtles can often be seen basking on logs in the wild. They are shy and will quickly slide into the water if they detect danger. As the name implies, these turtles have a leathery shell. 3540
46 <strong>Common Garter Snake</strong>
<em>Thamnophis sirtalis</em>
It took 10 attempts to get this picture with the tongue sticking out! Snakes smell by flicking their forked tongues. The ends of the tongue are placed into pits in the roof of the mout...

Common Garter Snake Thamnophis sirtalis It took 10 attempts to get this picture with the tongue sticking out! Snakes smell by flicking their forked tongues. The ends of the tongue are placed into pits in the roof of the mout...

Common Garter Snake Thamnophis sirtalis It took 10 attempts to get this picture with the tongue sticking out! Snakes smell by flicking their forked tongues. The ends of the tongue are placed into pits in the roof of the mouth (called the Jacobson's organ) where the odor molecules are processed. 3900
47 Garter Snake<strong>Common Garter Snake</strong>
<em>Thamnophis sirtalis</em>
I found this Garter Snake while I was hiking along the Haw Ridge Trail in early April 2005. It's a good thing I'm not freaked out by snakes, I see them fairly often.

Garter SnakeCommon Garter Snake Thamnophis sirtalis I found this Garter Snake while I was hiking along the Haw Ridge Trail in early April 2005. It's a good thing I'm not freaked out by snakes, I see them fairly often.

Garter SnakeCommon Garter Snake Thamnophis sirtalis I found this Garter Snake while I was hiking along the Haw Ridge Trail in early April 2005. It's a good thing I'm not freaked out by snakes, I see them fairly often. 3601
48 <strong>Northern Rough Greensnake</strong>
<em>Opheodrys aestivus aestivus</em>
September 10, 2006<br>
This little guy was crossing the trail at Haw Ridge.

Northern Rough Greensnake Opheodrys aestivus aestivus September 10, 2006
This little guy was crossing the trail at Haw Ridge.

Northern Rough Greensnake Opheodrys aestivus aestivus September 10, 2006
This little guy was crossing the trail at Haw Ridge.
2784
49 <strong>Northern Rough Greensnake</strong>
<em>Opheodrys aestivus aestivus</em>
These pretty little snakes seem to disappear when they slither into the grass, they are very well camouflaged. They are non-venomous, so they are not dangerous to handle....

Northern Rough Greensnake Opheodrys aestivus aestivus These pretty little snakes seem to disappear when they slither into the grass, they are very well camouflaged. They are non-venomous, so they are not dangerous to handle....

Northern Rough Greensnake Opheodrys aestivus aestivus These pretty little snakes seem to disappear when they slither into the grass, they are very well camouflaged. They are non-venomous, so they are not dangerous to handle. However, they have a quite effective method of repelling potential predators (and science teachers, as I found out!) --- they wrap their tail around whatever is holding them and smear foul-smelling poop! Yucch! 2111
50 <strong>Queen Snake</strong>
<em>Regina septemvittata</em> 
Oak Ridge, TN
Note the round pupils of this snake's eyes. In the United States, this is an indication that the snake is non-venomous. Don't rely on this sign in other parts of the world tho...

Queen Snake Regina septemvittata Oak Ridge, TN Note the round pupils of this snake's eyes. In the United States, this is an indication that the snake is non-venomous. Don't rely on this sign in other parts of the world tho...

Queen Snake Regina septemvittata Oak Ridge, TN Note the round pupils of this snake's eyes. In the United States, this is an indication that the snake is non-venomous. Don't rely on this sign in other parts of the world though, the deadly cobra of India also has round pupils! Click on the picture to enlarge the image. Another identifying factor of this snake are the keeled scales. This snake eats newly-molted crayfish. 4056
51 This Queen Snake was warming itself on the road near Melton Hill lake. After photographing it, I moved it with a stick to protect it in case the next motorist was a snake-hater! I didn't want to pick it up by hand, it would have pooped on me and probab...

This Queen Snake was warming itself on the road near Melton Hill lake. After photographing it, I moved it with a stick to protect it in case the next motorist was a snake-hater! I didn't want to pick it up by hand, it would have pooped on me and probab...

This Queen Snake was warming itself on the road near Melton Hill lake. After photographing it, I moved it with a stick to protect it in case the next motorist was a snake-hater! I didn't want to pick it up by hand, it would have pooped on me and probably bitten me too! When I set it down in the grass, it quickly wriggled off into the lake! Which reminds me of that joke...Why did the snake cross the road?...To show the 'possum it could be done! Excuse me for taking liberty on our good ole chicken joke:) 2740
52 <strong>Northern Water Snake</strong>
<em>Nerodia sipedon sipedon</em>
Tellico Plains, TN
This beautiful snake was warming itself on a stump above Bald River Falls in Cherokee National Forest. Some visitors were upset about seeing it. My comment to ...

Northern Water Snake Nerodia sipedon sipedon Tellico Plains, TN This beautiful snake was warming itself on a stump above Bald River Falls in Cherokee National Forest. Some visitors were upset about seeing it. My comment to ...

Northern Water Snake Nerodia sipedon sipedon Tellico Plains, TN This beautiful snake was warming itself on a stump above Bald River Falls in Cherokee National Forest. Some visitors were upset about seeing it. My comment to them was, "Yes, this is it's home!" This gave me "teachable moment," a chance to tell them how to tell the difference between a venomous copperhead and a non-venomous snake. The copperhead has an hourglass pattern of the light-colored bands, a broad, flat, copper-colored head, and the eyes have vertical-slit pupils (see Copperhead photo). This snake has round pupils. It amazes me how many people go to the forests and expect them to be sanitized of "undesirable" animals! What a boring and sad world it would be if we never got to see these animals. 8124
53 I saw this Brown Watersnake in a pond at the University of Tennessee Arboretum in Oak Ridge. When I went to the other side of the pond to get a closer look, it had slid into deeper water. They eat frogs and fish. East Tennessee does not have venomous w...

I saw this Brown Watersnake in a pond at the University of Tennessee Arboretum in Oak Ridge. When I went to the other side of the pond to get a closer look, it had slid into deeper water. They eat frogs and fish. East Tennessee does not have venomous w...

I saw this Brown Watersnake in a pond at the University of Tennessee Arboretum in Oak Ridge. When I went to the other side of the pond to get a closer look, it had slid into deeper water. They eat frogs and fish. East Tennessee does not have venomous water snakes, so this snake is no threat. Brown water snakes may not have venom, but they will bite if handled. Like many other snakes, it will defecate on the person who captures it. I have caught baby water snakes to show the children in my classes. They are nasty little snakes to handle! 4744
54 <strong>Northern Water Snake</strong> - juvenile
<em>Nerodia sipedon sipedon</em>
I photographed this snake while looking for Copperheads under the snake tins at Tremont in the Smokies.

Northern Water Snake - juvenile Nerodia sipedon sipedon I photographed this snake while looking for Copperheads under the snake tins at Tremont in the Smokies.

Northern Water Snake - juvenile Nerodia sipedon sipedon I photographed this snake while looking for Copperheads under the snake tins at Tremont in the Smokies. 3991
55 This <strong>Copperhead Snake</strong> <em>(Agkistrodon contortrix)</em> was photographed through glass at the Chattanooga Aquarium. I was glad to finally be able to get this close to a live one (safely!) to get a good picture! Note the hourglass patte...

This Copperhead Snake (Agkistrodon contortrix) was photographed through glass at the Chattanooga Aquarium. I was glad to finally be able to get this close to a live one (safely!) to get a good picture! Note the hourglass patte...

This Copperhead Snake (Agkistrodon contortrix) was photographed through glass at the Chattanooga Aquarium. I was glad to finally be able to get this close to a live one (safely!) to get a good picture! Note the hourglass pattern of the dark brown bands on the back, vertical slit pupil in the eye, and the pit between the eye and mouth. This is the most common venomous snake in the eastern United States, however they are the least venomous. They are very well camouflaged, so they aren't often seen in the woods. Copperheads give birth to live young (meaning the eggs hatched inside the mother). These snakes eat birds, small rodents, insects, lizards, snakes, and amphibians. Although the bite of a copperhead is seldom fatal in healthy humans, the venom does cause tissue destruction and must be treated in a hospital. Small dogs can die from being bitten by a copperhead. 3882
56 This is the band pattern of a <strong>Copperhead</strong> snake <em>(Agkistrodon contortrix)</em>. Note the "hourglass" pattern of the dark brown bands. This poor snake did not make it across the road. It is a shame that so many snakes are ruthlessly k...

This is the band pattern of a Copperhead snake (Agkistrodon contortrix). Note the "hourglass" pattern of the dark brown bands. This poor snake did not make it across the road. It is a shame that so many snakes are ruthlessly k...

This is the band pattern of a Copperhead snake (Agkistrodon contortrix). Note the "hourglass" pattern of the dark brown bands. This poor snake did not make it across the road. It is a shame that so many snakes are ruthlessly killed, regardless of whether or not they are venomous. Many people dislike snakes due to fear or religious beliefs, however, these animals are an important part of the ecosystem and they do have a place in the natural world! 3504
57 After dinner evening at the Summer Naturalist Week at Tremont, Dave, one of the researchers, took me down to the field to check the Snake traps. They are not really "traps" because the snakes can come and go as they please, I guess they should actually...

After dinner evening at the Summer Naturalist Week at Tremont, Dave, one of the researchers, took me down to the field to check the Snake traps. They are not really "traps" because the snakes can come and go as they please, I guess they should actually...

After dinner evening at the Summer Naturalist Week at Tremont, Dave, one of the researchers, took me down to the field to check the Snake traps. They are not really "traps" because the snakes can come and go as they please, I guess they should actually be called "snake attractors!" I was delighted to see a beautiful copperhead coiled in the corner when Dave lifted the tin! Out of the 5 tins we looked under, this was the only one with a copperhead, one of the others had a banded watersnake and another had a huge ant nest! The next day during an activity near the dorm, I saw 2 copperheads in the woods! The only other time I had seen a live copperhead was at Tremont a few years ago one evening when I was leading a night hike to go see the Ghost Fireflies. Since we had to get our eyes acclimated so we could walk in the dark, I was a bit preturbed when a car drove up and stopped in the road. Finally, walked up to the driver to see what was going on and he commented, "I stopped because there is a copperhead in the road in front of my car!" That driver may very well have saved me a trip to the emergency room! Had he not stopped, I probably would have stepped on it! 2215
58 This gorgeous Copperhead Snake was photographed under the sheet of tin at Tremont in the Smokies. It was the first time I'd seen a copperhead in the wild! I've probably walked by many of them during my walks through the woods, however they are difficul...

This gorgeous Copperhead Snake was photographed under the sheet of tin at Tremont in the Smokies. It was the first time I'd seen a copperhead in the wild! I've probably walked by many of them during my walks through the woods, however they are difficul...

This gorgeous Copperhead Snake was photographed under the sheet of tin at Tremont in the Smokies. It was the first time I'd seen a copperhead in the wild! I've probably walked by many of them during my walks through the woods, however they are difficult to spot due to their camouflaged skin pattern. Note the vertical pupil in the eye and the copper-colored head. 3137
59 This baby Copperhead Snake was seen in the woods during a nature activity at Tremont. It was about 15 inches long. I was attending a naturalist week, so all the other people in the group were as interested in the little snake as I was! 
Baby snakes ar...

This baby Copperhead Snake was seen in the woods during a nature activity at Tremont. It was about 15 inches long. I was attending a naturalist week, so all the other people in the group were as interested in the little snake as I was! Baby snakes ar...

This baby Copperhead Snake was seen in the woods during a nature activity at Tremont. It was about 15 inches long. I was attending a naturalist week, so all the other people in the group were as interested in the little snake as I was! Baby snakes are as dangerous as adults. Sometimes they are more dangerous because they are not able to control the amount of venom that they inject as well as an adult snake. 8219
60 The tail of a Copperhead has single scales below the anal slit; non-venomous snakes in the U.S. have double scales. This is a really lousy photo, I took it with my first digital camera which didn't do well close up! Now that I have a good digital SLR, ...

The tail of a Copperhead has single scales below the anal slit; non-venomous snakes in the U.S. have double scales. This is a really lousy photo, I took it with my first digital camera which didn't do well close up! Now that I have a good digital SLR, ...

The tail of a Copperhead has single scales below the anal slit; non-venomous snakes in the U.S. have double scales. This is a really lousy photo, I took it with my first digital camera which didn't do well close up! Now that I have a good digital SLR, I hope to get a better tail photo. The only problem is, the reason I was able to get this picture was because the snake was dead! 3960
61 This photo shows the pattern of a non-venomous Cornsnake's belly scales and anal slit. Notice how the scales on the tail become two.

This photo shows the pattern of a non-venomous Cornsnake's belly scales and anal slit. Notice how the scales on the tail become two.

This photo shows the pattern of a non-venomous Cornsnake's belly scales and anal slit. Notice how the scales on the tail become two. 2129
62 I found this Copperhead smashed on a gravel road in the Smokies. I guess this could be <strong>Dumb Tourist Trick #7</strong>! Unfortunately, this is some peoples' idea of a "good" snake, a <u>dead</u> one! Once, during one of my outdoor field trip cla...

I found this Copperhead smashed on a gravel road in the Smokies. I guess this could be Dumb Tourist Trick #7! Unfortunately, this is some peoples' idea of a "good" snake, a dead one! Once, during one of my outdoor field trip cla...

I found this Copperhead smashed on a gravel road in the Smokies. I guess this could be Dumb Tourist Trick #7! Unfortunately, this is some peoples' idea of a "good" snake, a dead one! Once, during one of my outdoor field trip classes I was talking to the school bus driver (who was also a part-time backwoods preacher). He asked if there were any snakes in the area. I told him there were, his reply was (in a thick East Tennessee drawl), "Ah kill ever snake ah see!" When I asked, "Why?" he answered in a sing-song sermon tone, "'Cause when aaaah see a snake, aaaah see the faaaace of the Devil!" I knew then there was nothing I could say to convince him otherwise! It is a shame that some religions have stigmatized certain creatures, such as snakes, so much. 2476
63 <strong>Timber Rattlesnake</strong>
<em>Crotalus horridus</em>
I'm not especially freaked out by snakes, but I was glad there was a thick sheet of plexiglass between me and this guy at the Tennessee Aquarium! The Timber Rattler is a pit viper, it can...

Timber Rattlesnake Crotalus horridus I'm not especially freaked out by snakes, but I was glad there was a thick sheet of plexiglass between me and this guy at the Tennessee Aquarium! The Timber Rattler is a pit viper, it can...

Timber Rattlesnake Crotalus horridus I'm not especially freaked out by snakes, but I was glad there was a thick sheet of plexiglass between me and this guy at the Tennessee Aquarium! The Timber Rattler is a pit viper, it can hunt in pitch dark by detecting the heat (infrared) of its prey. 3234
64 <strong>Timber Rattlesnake</strong>
<em>Crotalus horridus</em>
This huge snake is in one of the exhibits at the Chattanooga Nature Center.

Timber Rattlesnake Crotalus horridus This huge snake is in one of the exhibits at the Chattanooga Nature Center.

Timber Rattlesnake Crotalus horridus This huge snake is in one of the exhibits at the Chattanooga Nature Center. 2255
65 I also photographed this <strong> Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake</strong>  <em>(Crotalus adamanteus)</em> through thick plastic at the Chattanooga Aquarium. Unfortunately, the barrier was smeared, so the photo is a bit blurry. But, hey, I'm not going ...

I also photographed this Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus) through thick plastic at the Chattanooga Aquarium. Unfortunately, the barrier was smeared, so the photo is a bit blurry. But, hey, I'm not going ...

I also photographed this Timber Rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) through thick plastic at the Chattanooga Aquarium. Unfortunately, the barrier was smeared, so the photo is a bit blurry. But, hey, I'm not going to be too picky where rattlesnakes are concerned! Rattlesnakes are venomous, not poisonous (you can eat rattlesnakes)! Venom is injected through either a bite or a sting; poison is taken into the body by touching a substance or eating it. I teach my students that "Venom" starts with "V". I hold up my index and middle fingers pointing the tips down in a biting motion like snake fangs. To simulate a stinger I make the bottom of the "V" go down. Since the word "poison" starts with a "P" (which is round at the top), think of the tip of a finger and the tip of the tongue as being round; poison must be touched or tasted (eaten). Note the vertical pupil in the eye and the pit near the nostril, only venomous snakes in North America have these traits. Rattlesnakes are pit vipers, they use the pit as a heat or infrared sensor. They can "see" warm-blooded prey, such as a rat or mouse, in pitch dark. Rattlesnakes grow a new button segment on their rattle every time they shed their skin. They may shed more than once a year and they can lose buttons, so the number of buttons on the rattle is not a reliable indicator of how old the snake is. To some people, rattlesnakes seem to have an "evil" look because of the ridge over their eyes and their unblinking stare! The ridge protects their eyes from glare and they don't have eyelids to blink. All snakes shed the covering over their eyes when they shed their skin. It is often easy to tell when a snake is getting ready to shed because the eyes will have a milky look to them as the skin loosens. 3624
66 <strong>Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake</strong> 
<em>Crotalus adamanteus</em>
Munson, FL
Dec. 26, 2008

We were excited to see this little (~18", but we didn't want to risk getting bitten trying to find out its actual length) rattlesnake while we...

Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake Crotalus adamanteus Munson, FL Dec. 26, 2008 We were excited to see this little (~18", but we didn't want to risk getting bitten trying to find out its actual length) rattlesnake while we...

Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake Crotalus adamanteus Munson, FL Dec. 26, 2008 We were excited to see this little (~18", but we didn't want to risk getting bitten trying to find out its actual length) rattlesnake while we were hiking at Blackwater River State Park on the day after Christmas. It was a very warm day and the reptiles were active. This young snake had 2 little buttons on its tail. It didn't seem to have the "rattle thing" down yet, it wiggled its tail down slowly and didn't make any sound. 3160
67 <strong>Western Diamondback Rattlesnake </strong>
<em>Crotalus atrox</em>
Las Cruces, NM
Oct. 7, 2008

Wow, what a thrill it was to get to see this snake! It was our last day of our week-long trip to southern New Mexico and we were lamenting that ...

Western Diamondback Rattlesnake Crotalus atrox Las Cruces, NM Oct. 7, 2008 Wow, what a thrill it was to get to see this snake! It was our last day of our week-long trip to southern New Mexico and we were lamenting that ...

Western Diamondback Rattlesnake Crotalus atrox Las Cruces, NM Oct. 7, 2008 Wow, what a thrill it was to get to see this snake! It was our last day of our week-long trip to southern New Mexico and we were lamenting that we had hiked 15 miles on 4 different trails and had not seen a single snake. As we were driving down a gravel road after our final hike we spotted this guy (or gal) sunning in the middle of the road. Fortunately, we didn't hit it! I was glad I had my 300mm telephoto lens on my camera at the time! :) These snakes are also called "Coon-tail snakes" due to their black and white striped tails. Rattlesnakes are pit vipers, note the pit on the snake's face. The pits are used to detect heat from warmblooded prey, such as mice or rats. 3278
68 <strong>Scarlet Milksnake</strong>
<em>Lampropeltis triangulum elapsoides</em>
"Red on black, venom lack;
Red on yellow, kill a fellow."
This poem can help you remember how to tell the difference between a non-venomous Scarlet Milksnake and the ven...

Scarlet Milksnake Lampropeltis triangulum elapsoides "Red on black, venom lack; Red on yellow, kill a fellow." This poem can help you remember how to tell the difference between a non-venomous Scarlet Milksnake and the ven...

Scarlet Milksnake Lampropeltis triangulum elapsoides "Red on black, venom lack; Red on yellow, kill a fellow." This poem can help you remember how to tell the difference between a non-venomous Scarlet Milksnake and the venomous Coral Snake. When the black bands touch red bands, the snake is harmless. However, birds and other predators that may want to eat these snakes don't know the difference. I took this photo at the Living Desert Museum in Palm Desert, California. 3092
69 <strong>Corn Snake; Red Rat Snake</strong>
<em>Elaphe guttata</em><br>
This attractive Corn Snake was stretched out on the trail at Big South Fork. Cornsnakes could appear to be a copperhead at first glance, but the dark patterns don't constrict over...

Corn Snake; Red Rat Snake Elaphe guttata
This attractive Corn Snake was stretched out on the trail at Big South Fork. Cornsnakes could appear to be a copperhead at first glance, but the dark patterns don't constrict over...

Corn Snake; Red Rat Snake Elaphe guttata
This attractive Corn Snake was stretched out on the trail at Big South Fork. Cornsnakes could appear to be a copperhead at first glance, but the dark patterns don't constrict over the backbone to make an hourglass pattern and the head is rounded instead of flattened and triangular. Snakes help control the rodent and insect population, they are an important part of a healthy ecosystem.
3765
70 This Corn Snake was warming itself on a trail above Mead's Quarry at Ijams. The patterns on its skin were beautiful. (Yes, I did have to get on the ground near the snake to get this photo!)

This Corn Snake was warming itself on a trail above Mead's Quarry at Ijams. The patterns on its skin were beautiful. (Yes, I did have to get on the ground near the snake to get this photo!)

This Corn Snake was warming itself on a trail above Mead's Quarry at Ijams. The patterns on its skin were beautiful. (Yes, I did have to get on the ground near the snake to get this photo!) 2333
71 Ranger Michelle at Frozen Head State Park shows a group of elementary school children "Charlie", the resident corn snake. They were surprised to learn that snakes are not icky and slimy! The boys were impressed to see that a "girl" would hold a snake! :)

Ranger Michelle at Frozen Head State Park shows a group of elementary school children "Charlie", the resident corn snake. They were surprised to learn that snakes are not icky and slimy! The boys were impressed to see that a "girl" would hold a snake! :)

Ranger Michelle at Frozen Head State Park shows a group of elementary school children "Charlie", the resident corn snake. They were surprised to learn that snakes are not icky and slimy! The boys were impressed to see that a "girl" would hold a snake! :) 1954
72 <strong>Southern Ringneck Snake</strong>
<em>Diadophis punctatus punctatus</em>
This is one of my favorite snakes! We found this adorable little hatchling on a warm spring day while hiking along the Mead's Quarry Trail at Ijams Nature Center. It did ...

Southern Ringneck Snake Diadophis punctatus punctatus This is one of my favorite snakes! We found this adorable little hatchling on a warm spring day while hiking along the Mead's Quarry Trail at Ijams Nature Center. It did ...

Southern Ringneck Snake Diadophis punctatus punctatus This is one of my favorite snakes! We found this adorable little hatchling on a warm spring day while hiking along the Mead's Quarry Trail at Ijams Nature Center. It did try to bite Kenny while he held it, but it couldn't do much damage with such a tiny mouth! Ringneck snakes grow to an average of about 12". They typically eat slugs, small salamanders, snakes and lizards, and earthworms. 4015
73 <strong>Black Rat Snakes</strong>
<em>Elaphe obsoleta obsoleta</em>
<u>Nothing</u> will bring an outdoor class to a screeching halt faster than someone sighting a snake! During our 2006 Science Explorers Camp in Oak Ridge my colleague was teaching a ...

Black Rat Snakes Elaphe obsoleta obsoleta Nothing will bring an outdoor class to a screeching halt faster than someone sighting a snake! During our 2006 Science Explorers Camp in Oak Ridge my colleague was teaching a ...

Black Rat Snakes Elaphe obsoleta obsoleta Nothing will bring an outdoor class to a screeching halt faster than someone sighting a snake! During our 2006 Science Explorers Camp in Oak Ridge my colleague was teaching a class on Flight and Hovercraft outside the cabin. I noticed two of the boys pointing toward a large tree. They said they saw a snake. I walked over to the tree to check it out. The "snake" turned out to be two snakes, they were mating in the tree! It was amazing to see them coiling and writhing in the fork of the branches. As 24 kids came running up, the snakes moved to the other side of the tree. Suddenly, the snakes lost their "footing" and they fell together 15 or so feet to the ground. Amazingly, they were unfazed! The campers learned the meaning of the word "oblivious"! (see next photo) I have had a lot of exciting things happen in the 17 years that I have taught at science camp, but this had to be one of the most exciting yet! For once, it was good that some of the kids were distracted and not paying attention to the teacher! Ha! 3204
74 The Black Rat snakes continued to mate for about an hour, "oblivious" to all the activity going on around them. Suddenly, when the "love mood" was over, they quickly went their separate ways. One slithered off to the near-by field and the other (probab...

The Black Rat snakes continued to mate for about an hour, "oblivious" to all the activity going on around them. Suddenly, when the "love mood" was over, they quickly went their separate ways. One slithered off to the near-by field and the other (probab...

The Black Rat snakes continued to mate for about an hour, "oblivious" to all the activity going on around them. Suddenly, when the "love mood" was over, they quickly went their separate ways. One slithered off to the near-by field and the other (probably the male) climbed back up in the sugar maple tree. (see next photo) 3104
75 We were amazed to watch the Black Rat Snake climb a large Sugar Maple tree at Science Camp, especially after a "love marathon". Climbing snakes use their belly scales and strong muscles to work their way up the bark of a tree.

We were amazed to watch the Black Rat Snake climb a large Sugar Maple tree at Science Camp, especially after a "love marathon". Climbing snakes use their belly scales and strong muscles to work their way up the bark of a tree.

We were amazed to watch the Black Rat Snake climb a large Sugar Maple tree at Science Camp, especially after a "love marathon". Climbing snakes use their belly scales and strong muscles to work their way up the bark of a tree. 4876
76 On an unusually warm day in mid-March 2006 I took my students on a hike at the University of Tennessee Arboretum. As we walked down a trail I heard one of the kids yell, "Snake!" I couldn't believe a snake would be out that early in the year, but sure ...

On an unusually warm day in mid-March 2006 I took my students on a hike at the University of Tennessee Arboretum. As we walked down a trail I heard one of the kids yell, "Snake!" I couldn't believe a snake would be out that early in the year, but sure ...

On an unusually warm day in mid-March 2006 I took my students on a hike at the University of Tennessee Arboretum. As we walked down a trail I heard one of the kids yell, "Snake!" I couldn't believe a snake would be out that early in the year, but sure enough, there was this huge Black Rat Snake sunning on a small tree sapling. 2540
77 One of the students also found this tiny brown snake curled up on the ground during the March Arboretum hike. It was too cold to move  at first, but the warmth of the child's hand soon invigorated the snake and it crawled away into the leaves.

One of the students also found this tiny brown snake curled up on the ground during the March Arboretum hike. It was too cold to move at first, but the warmth of the child's hand soon invigorated the snake and it crawled away into the leaves.

One of the students also found this tiny brown snake curled up on the ground during the March Arboretum hike. It was too cold to move at first, but the warmth of the child's hand soon invigorated the snake and it crawled away into the leaves. 3513
78 <strong>Five-lined Skink</strong> Eggs
<em>Eumeces fasciatus</em>
Kenny and I found these tiny 5-lined skink eggs in the middle of a trail at Haw Ridge (they were about the size of jellybeans). A nearby turtle nest had been dug up, only the dried she...

Five-lined Skink Eggs Eumeces fasciatus Kenny and I found these tiny 5-lined skink eggs in the middle of a trail at Haw Ridge (they were about the size of jellybeans). A nearby turtle nest had been dug up, only the dried she...

Five-lined Skink Eggs Eumeces fasciatus Kenny and I found these tiny 5-lined skink eggs in the middle of a trail at Haw Ridge (they were about the size of jellybeans). A nearby turtle nest had been dug up, only the dried shells of the eggs remained. We saw the skink eggs near a log that had been ripped open. Strangely, it was in the middle of the day and the trail had many bike riders, I don't know how long it had been since the nest had been disturbed. I scooped up the eggs and decayed wood as best I could and put them in the woods near another log. Thanks to my friend and local herpetologist, John Byrd, for help in identifying the eggs. 3660
79 <strong>Souteastern Five-lined Skink; Blue-tailed skink</strong> - adult
<em>Eumeces inexpectatus</em>
One of the boys at science camp caught this skink during our daily Habitat Hunters activity. These reptiles are so fast I had to resort to taking t...

Souteastern Five-lined Skink; Blue-tailed skink - adult Eumeces inexpectatus One of the boys at science camp caught this skink during our daily Habitat Hunters activity. These reptiles are so fast I had to resort to taking t...

Souteastern Five-lined Skink; Blue-tailed skink - adult Eumeces inexpectatus One of the boys at science camp caught this skink during our daily Habitat Hunters activity. These reptiles are so fast I had to resort to taking this photo with the skink in a jar. Check out the long toe on the hind feet! The young of these skinks have a blue tail. Once I told woman about seeing a skink, she asked condescendingly, "Don't you mean a skunk?!" I got a kick out of her ignorance of nature! :) 2497
80 <strong>Souteastern Five-lined Skink</strong> - adult
<em>Eumeces inexpectatus</em>
I snapped this photo of the skink on the porch just before it ran through one of the cracks between the boards!

Souteastern Five-lined Skink - adult Eumeces inexpectatus I snapped this photo of the skink on the porch just before it ran through one of the cracks between the boards!

Souteastern Five-lined Skink - adult Eumeces inexpectatus I snapped this photo of the skink on the porch just before it ran through one of the cracks between the boards! 2070
81 <strong>Five-lined Skink</strong> - juvenile
<em>Eumeces fasciatus</em>
Munson, FL
Sept. 1, 2007
I have been trying to get a photo of a "blue-tailed" skink for quite awhile, they are not the most cooperative critters! I took this one from the board...

Five-lined Skink - juvenile Eumeces fasciatus Munson, FL Sept. 1, 2007 I have been trying to get a photo of a "blue-tailed" skink for quite awhile, they are not the most cooperative critters! I took this one from the board...

Five-lined Skink - juvenile Eumeces fasciatus Munson, FL Sept. 1, 2007 I have been trying to get a photo of a "blue-tailed" skink for quite awhile, they are not the most cooperative critters! I took this one from the boardwalk at Blackwater River State Park in Florida. The juveniles are the only ones with the blue tails. 1944
82 Adult Five-lined Skink

Adult Five-lined Skink

Adult Five-lined Skink 1817
83 <strong>American Alligator</strong> 
<em>Alligator mississippiensis</em>
I photographed this little guy at the Tennessee Aquarium in Chattanooga in the Bayou exhibit. I've seen alligators in the wild just a couple of times in Florida and South Carolina.

American Alligator Alligator mississippiensis I photographed this little guy at the Tennessee Aquarium in Chattanooga in the Bayou exhibit. I've seen alligators in the wild just a couple of times in Florida and South Carolina.

American Alligator Alligator mississippiensis I photographed this little guy at the Tennessee Aquarium in Chattanooga in the Bayou exhibit. I've seen alligators in the wild just a couple of times in Florida and South Carolina. 2386
84 We spotted this baby Alligator (about 18" long) while we were taking a ride on the tour boat at Wakulla Springs State Park in Florida in May 2010.

We spotted this baby Alligator (about 18" long) while we were taking a ride on the tour boat at Wakulla Springs State Park in Florida in May 2010.

We spotted this baby Alligator (about 18" long) while we were taking a ride on the tour boat at Wakulla Springs State Park in Florida in May 2010. 1636
85 <strong>Pine Snake</strong>
<em>Pituophis melanoleucus</em>
Homosassa Springs State Park, FL
Dec. 2009

This snake is non-venomous.

Pine Snake Pituophis melanoleucus Homosassa Springs State Park, FL Dec. 2009 This snake is non-venomous.

Pine Snake Pituophis melanoleucus Homosassa Springs State Park, FL Dec. 2009 This snake is non-venomous. 1983
86 <strong>Pygmy Rattlesnake</strong> - venomous
<em>Sistrurus miliarius</em>
Homosassa Springs State Park, FL
Dec. 2009

This was not the way I wanted to photograph one of these snakes, behind glass with mulch and fake plants, but I have not been ab...

Pygmy Rattlesnake - venomous Sistrurus miliarius Homosassa Springs State Park, FL Dec. 2009 This was not the way I wanted to photograph one of these snakes, behind glass with mulch and fake plants, but I have not been ab...

Pygmy Rattlesnake - venomous Sistrurus miliarius Homosassa Springs State Park, FL Dec. 2009 This was not the way I wanted to photograph one of these snakes, behind glass with mulch and fake plants, but I have not been able to see one in the wild! My parents have these snakes in their yard, their Jack Russell Terrier was bitten by one last year. 1908
87 A Rattlesnake Skeleton

A Rattlesnake Skeleton

A Rattlesnake Skeleton 3047
88 <strong>Cottonmouth; Water Moccasin</strong> - venomous
<em>Agkistrodon piscivorus</em>
Homosassa Springs State Park, FL
Dec. 2009

The state park had a very nice snake exhibit. I was glad to be able to photograph some of the dangerously venomous ...

Cottonmouth; Water Moccasin - venomous Agkistrodon piscivorus Homosassa Springs State Park, FL Dec. 2009 The state park had a very nice snake exhibit. I was glad to be able to photograph some of the dangerously venomous ...

Cottonmouth; Water Moccasin - venomous Agkistrodon piscivorus Homosassa Springs State Park, FL Dec. 2009 The state park had a very nice snake exhibit. I was glad to be able to photograph some of the dangerously venomous snakes safely! These snakes can be aggressive, they reveal their white-skinned mouth when they are in a threatening pose. These snakes are often found in water, the genus name piscivorus means "fish-eater," but they also eat frogs. 2608
89 <strong>Coral Snake</strong>
<em>Micrurus fulvius fulvius</em>
Homosassa Springs State Park
Dec. 2009

This lovely snake has the warning colors to remind predators and people that it is highly venomous. The Scarlet Milk Snake has the same colors, ...

Coral Snake Micrurus fulvius fulvius Homosassa Springs State Park Dec. 2009 This lovely snake has the warning colors to remind predators and people that it is highly venomous. The Scarlet Milk Snake has the same colors, ...

Coral Snake Micrurus fulvius fulvius Homosassa Springs State Park Dec. 2009 This lovely snake has the warning colors to remind predators and people that it is highly venomous. The Scarlet Milk Snake has the same colors, but different banding patterns. It helps to remember the little poems: "Red on yellow, kill a fellow; red on black, friend of Jack", or "Red on Yellow Kills a Fellow, Red on Black, Venom Lack." The milksnakes have red bands touching the black bands. 2092

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